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January 29, 1970 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-29

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TH'E NI#CH#GAN DA# Y

Thursday, January Z9, 197Q

THE MiCHIGAN DAILY Thursday, January 29, 1970

ROPOSES PARITY:
GA asks for representation
on Rackham Executive Board

Effect of disruption on bylaw
decision discounted by Fleming

SHOE
Repair n Care

i

-full and half soles
---heels
-shines

-desalting
--waterproofing (silicone)
--dying

By ANITA WETTERSTROEM
Graduate Assembly last night
passed a proposal asking for equal
representation of faculty and
graduate students on the Rack-
ham Executive Board and also
elected six new executive officers.
'GA President Norm Wilson, who
made the proposal, explained "A
host of problems could be solved
with students on the board."
He said- the board would no
longer have to come to the as-
sembly to find ,students for dis-
sertation committees and that stu-
dents would benefit by having a
voice in general board matters.
Wilson said students could have
an important role in establishing
degree requirements, and in setting
policies which affect teaching fel-
lows.
Prsently comprised of 12 fac-
ulty members elected by the fac-
ulty, the executive board makes
final decisions on dissertation re-
quirements, fellowship and grant
distribution and certain graduate
school basic policies..
Wilson said that he expects the
board will approve the proposal
when it is submitted through Vice
President and Rackham Dean
Stephan Spurr. The president said
Spurr "seemed resigned that stu-
dent representation was coming."
"But he wasn't thrilled about
it," Wilson added. .
The proposal asks that the stu-
dent candidates for the board be
nominated and screened by the
Rackham Student Government for
the initial election. Thereafter,
they would be nominated by the
student members of the board. ..

Also on GA's agenda last nighturer; Jean Mass, recording secre-
was the election of officers for tary and Idelle Datloff, corres-
the coming year. ponding secretary.
Newly elected officers, taking Outgoing officers are: Wilson;
over responsibilities immediately William Price, executive vice presi-

are: Robert Marrone, president; d
Joel Newman, executive vice pres- t
ident; Robert Trew, administrativeB
vice president; Rod Smith, treas-ri

E
Jr
B:
re

STA TE, LOCA L PO
Ann Arboi
(Continued from Page 1)
In yesterday's second raid, Ann
Arbor police narcotics agents and
State Police arrested seven per-2
sons at what they described as a
"pot party."
Two of the seven, Geoffrey Hall
Jr. and James H. Livingston, were
charged with the sale of mariju-
ana. The remaining five were re-
leased b u t Police Chief Walter
Krasny said they will be charged
with possession of marijuana.
Detective Lt. Eugene Stauden-
meier said as far as he knew, nones
of those arrested are University
students.j
The raid was staged in a house,
at 1302 Packard St. about 9 p.m.
last night after city and state po-
licemen had received information
on activities there.
"We were just following nor-
nal, routine police business,"
Staudenmeier sai'd. He said the
police were not "cracking down"

ent; Howard Brilliant, adminis-
rative vice president; Michael
3rown, treasurer; Lois Gottlieb,
ecording secretary.'
LICE:
Ldrug raids
on marijuana any more than us-
ual.
Krasny said several pounds of

(Continued from Page 1)
allow SGC to levy dues upon all
students if the levy were approved
by a student referendum. The re-
gental draft authorizes Council to
receive only those funds "appro-
priated by Regents."
The power to assess students for
operating funds is considered im-
portant by SGC because it would
presumably make it easier for
Council to increase its budget and,
consequently, its activities in be-
half of its student-constituency.
Commenting on the draft, the
Regents emphasized that the re-
visions were subject to the com-
ments and suggestions of faculty
and students.
SGC members believe the Re-
gents will not be receptive to stu-
dent demands for restoring the
original bylaw wording.
In its resolution, SGC called on
students "who wish to exercise
any self-determination over their'
f lives in the University" to attend'

I

ested in resolving issues or bring-
ing about confrontations," the
president wrote.
"The Administration and the
Regents will not engage in name
calling or threats," he added.
"Neither will they be influenced

"In reviewing the . confron-
tations of last fall, it seems that
the conversations were more in
good faith after the confrontation.
than before," McLaughlin said in
his letter.

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1l t 4i~ " tl 4~cyucutuurtccu Fleming, haoweVer', Called last
by them. fall's confrontations "unneces-
In his response, McLaughlin sary," saying the dispute was even-
said leaving the question of non- tually "resolved by good-faith con-
academicarule-making with the I versations."
schools and colleges -was ta nt-f'
amount to authorizing the faculty A egeene en
"taretin s mch ontolovert R-Stockbridge }, who changed his
student life as they feel like exer- store plan a 5-3 margin of ap-
cising.
"his intmgproval, said yesterday he did so
"This is not something that can "despite the confrontations, not
be dispassionately debated at the because of them.
next five Regents' meetings and "The thing that motivated me
then resolved by -mutually agree-
able compromise,'' the letter most strongly against changing my
stated. vote were the confrontations," he,
The effect of confrontation tac- said.

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tics on regental decisions has been -
a subject of discussion among stu-
dent leaders since the controversy I
last fall over the establishment

CONFERENCE ON REPRESSION

marijuana were confiscated b u t the Feb. 20 Regents meeting and" of a University bookstore.
declined comment on reports that indicate their demands. When the Regents did not ap-
other drugs were also seized. If the demands are ignored, the ;rove i. bookstore plan agreeable
rresolution continued, the students to SGC, about 400 students inter-
Kruse ay beoneodthe mkordt. should make it impossible for the rupted a Regents meeting Sept.
house may be one of the major Regents to meet in public. 19 which was subsequently ad-
outlets for marijuana in the city. In his letter to McLaughlin and journed.
Both Hall and Livingston list 1302 Payne, Fleming s a i d the SGC A week later, 107 students wer,
Packard as their address, Krasny resolution has "aggravated the arrested after holding a sit-in in
added. situation." the LSA Bldg. to demand that the
Hall, who is listed as a student "This sort of tactic on the part Regents approve the SGC book-
at Washtenaw Community Col- of SGC, in the face of a perfectly store plan.-
lege, was arraigned last night be- reasonable request on the part of some ntudents believe these ac-
fore District Judge Pieter G. the Regents for comments and tions were instrumental in bring-
Thomassen who scheduled a pre- suggestions raises the substantive ing about approval of the student-
trial examination for Feb. 4. question of whether SGC is inter- faculty bookstore plan in October.
JAN. 31 , FREE "
7:30 P.M. ON L
i? REPRESSION AD.
SPEAKERS SAT. NIGHT: 2 prominent victims of repression (Hil-;
ard, Rubin)}; an expert on legal aspects of repression and politi-
cal trials (Kinoy) ; a historian (Crowthier) ,They will give a broad
view of repression, its effects, and how things got this way. Work-
shops will deal with the following aspects of repression.
WORKSHOPS ON:
(1 ) Repression in the Military '4) Urban Repression
(2) Repression of Labor 5) Mass Media & Repression
(3) Repression of Women t6) Welfare as Repression

Saturday 7:30 p.m.

Hill Auditorium

Sunday 1:00 p.m.

Siera Clb to discuIss
environment problem
By HESTER PULLING Local citizens are concerned
Seen a car fall off the Mackinac about the nearby Huron River be-
- Bridge lately? Brushing y o u r cause it is one of the few recrea-
teeth with Michigan's sudsy wat- tional resources in the ar e a,
er? The Mackinac chapter of the Cellarius says.
nationiwide Sierre Club, a group Maintenance and development
4ntiested In the' enjoymentgand of recreational areas along the
hreservation of nature, has sol- Huron will come under considera-
e.""d the first problem recently and tion by the club.
is working on the other.
An open meeting of the chapter "There used to be swimming in
will be held today at the North- that river and we would like to
side Presbyterian Church, 1679 see it again," Cellarius said. "We
Broadway, at 7:30 p.m. also will look into all the salt on
Chapter Secretary Richard Cel- the streets that goes into t he
larius says the local group is main- Huron. It can do incredible things
ly concerned with local recreation to the fish, plants and algae."
problems and the deteriorating Air pollution will also be dis-
quality of the Huron River. cussed. "University smokestacks,
A primary target is the Chrysler factories and automobiles all con-
corporation plant in Scio town- tribute to the problem around
ship.. The firm plans to build a here," Cellarius noted. "What we
new parking lot across from the
plant with the idea of developing need is a citizen organization to
the plant into a larger industrial act as a watchdog on the city
complex. i as well as the county."
$ .u
Sd, ry-pecial-$
$. ti ..: i
i.
fTHE
WICKER ,
S~
t x..1 1 .. i ". y
'. '. d$22.00
{UEViE"U N/A
; t'mI'
Round orduro
: ' ,?A
CUSHON.3.9
CudlFur P owSpcal$.5
" 3(< y.
THE
MKWICKER
? J < aD ,x

THE HISTORICAL CONTEXT & THE CONTEMPORARY SITUATION
THE RIGHT REVEREND EDWARD CR0WTHER
DAVID HILIEARD-Black Panther Party
ARTHUR KINOY-Lawyer
ERRY ROBIN-Conspiracy 8 Defendant
Bishop Crowther has degrees in history and law and taught criminal and
constitutional laws at Oxford. As Anglican Bishop in South Africa he was
arrested and deported for his work against apartheid. He has been at the
Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions and is currently .lecturing
on "Racism in the African Continent" in the Black Studies Program at Univ.
of Calif. Mast recently he was arrested with 180 others, including Senator
Hart's wife, for "making a loud and unusual noise" in the Pentagon.
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