100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 27, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE N11CH1GAN DAILY

Tuesday, January 27, 1970

THE MiCHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, January 27, 1970

.

theatre

A hidden
By JOHN ALLEN

'Criminal'

cinema
A Hitchcock of another game

FRE !

H EA

JAN. 31

7 30 P.M.
NQ CHARGE!

Reading the Cuban revolution
into Jose Triana's The Crim-
inals might be a pleasant past-
time for amateur politicos and
vest-pocket revolutionaries; but
it' isn't a necessary activity of
theatregoers. Or at least it
shouldn't be. Neither history
nor propaganda looks its best
in costumes, makeup, and light-
ing. Drama, of course, can wear
anything, including history and
propaganda, so long as its es-
sential elan is not utterly buried.
These are at least moments
in The Criminals when that elan
peeks through the veifs of rhe-
toric and histrionics, moments
when a genuine sense of the
dramatic and the theatrical
coalesces on the stage and makes
the evening worthwhile. Such
moments are perhaps too few;
but taken together they infuse
the play with a nervous kind of
energy and a definite sense of
Fpromise.
Very briefly, the play is con-
stituted of a series of conflicts
acted out by three children-
two girls and a boy-who have
holed themselves up in the attic
of their home, apparently after
killing their parents. The ythree
characters in search of an iden-
tity imagine their way into vari-
ous roles: aunts, uncles, the par-
' ents, a prosecuting attorney, a
3ud wge. The characters themselves
remnain .somewhat ill-defined in
this flux of identities, yet the
sense of tension is not thereby
dissipated.
What remains constantis an
aura of crisis, a submerged
- threat of chaos always on the
verge of erupting into irration-
alty and sustained violence-
yet somehow held under and
channeled into ritualized ag-
gression. One suspects that the
invisible parents are not actual-
ly dead: that the fiction of their
slaughter is perhaps a fantasy
that fuels the games the child-
ren have chosen to play in the
atic as an alternative to any
genuine action and responsi-
bility.
What is chiefly lacking from
the play, however, as any im-
mediate sense of movement in
a particular line, any shaping
force capable of elevating inten-
sity to clarity, of elevating a
heavy-handed "meaningfulness"
to significance. It is not even
" that these things are absent so
much as that they seem, on first
==viewing, at any rate, to be large-
ly unrealized. We are perhaps
.";-told mre than we are shown,
. and told it isin fashionably non-
sequential _way. But mere state-
ment is the busness of history
and propaganda; what is neces-
sary for drama-or any part---
is not statement but expressive-
ness. And that is what appears
htostoouncertainly embedded
in the histrionics of The Crm-
inals..
The cast is limited to three,
all of whom aire young and all
of whom are on stage the entire
time. Given such circumstances
and the play's own imbalances
and unrealized possibilities, it
is understandable that the pro-
duction itself is not as uniform
as one might-wish. It is perhaps
also fair to give the performers
credit for tackling the truly awe-
some task of trying to enliven
characters that are intentionally
frayed and fluctuating.
Of the three Miss Linda Sel-
man was perhaps the most sue.
cesful in giving substane to a
role that is, at best, a shifting
conglomeration of lights and
shadows. Barry Primus as the
boy was perhaps too conscious-
ly "on stage" the whole time and
Penelope Allen as the other girl
spOke her lines with a heavy
stage accent that seemed to call
kinto question the closeness of
;".her kinship with the other two

characters. The rather breathy
lady baritone enunciation s h e
gave to her lines was not cal-
culated to create the most cred-
ible of characters, to say the
least.
David Wheeler's direction was
at least valiant, nicely shaped
tp the claustrophobic atmosphere
dfthe play and the set.-
the latter by James Tilton.
We do not seem to be living
in a period particularly pro-
ductive of exciting new plays or
playwrights; yet The Criminals
suggests that a playwright of
strength and energy is alive and
well - or as well as can be ex-
pected - somewhere in Ha-
vana. It would be pleasant to
see something of his that seem-
ed more fully a metaphor rath-
er than a product of a pres-
sure-cooker.

By NEAL GABLER
Alfred Hitchcock is undeni-
ably a master film craftsman,
fery probably unrivaled in the
art of audience manipulation.
Just when the viewer expects
him to deliver the fatal blow...
nothing. Then, at the most un-
expected moment, blamC Sur e
enough, he catches us off-guard.
And, realizing that it is near
heresy in our alienated society,
I admit that I go to Hitchcock
films precisely to be manipulat-
ed, to become a pawn for his
skillful manuveurs.
Most of grew up during two
periods of Hitchcock's career.
In the first period, pre-1960,
the films were all poured from
the same mold. The protagonist,
whether he be James Stewart or
C a r y Grant or Henry Fonda,
was an Everyman caught in a
inextricable web of intrigue,
forced to vindicate himself be-
fore the mocking unbelievers.
Though it was seldom evident,
one ingredient in the suspense
was our attachment to this av-
erage Joe struggling against
sinister forces. We cared about{
him, feared f o r him, and
breathed a huge sigh of relief
when he succeeded, as we knew
he must.
But in .1960, the master chang-

ed the script. Since then, his
films have suffered from t h e
same malady. However, it is by
no means an uncontrollable vir-
us but rather the direct result
of two quirks in the Hitchcock
nature. The first is his notor-
ious hatred for performers and,
from the looks of his last few
films, the feeling is mutual. The
second is the indifference with
which he approaches his ma-
terial. He has proclaimed pub-
licly that he held Leon Uris'
Topaz in no special esteem
but ...
Topaz now playing at t h e
State Theatre, like The Birds,
Marnie and Torn Curtain, gets
hit by both barrels. The unfor-
tunate result is that the movie
is peopled with manikins, not
flesh and blood. I, for one, miss
t h e vibrance of Redgrave in
The Lady Vanishes or of Cary
Grant in North by Northwest.
The story, ill-suited to the
Hitchcock style, complements
the acting. It does give him an -
opportunity to display t h e
flourishes at which he is so
adept. But where is the little
man, someone with whom we
can identify? Therein lies the
major fault of the film. This is
not the adventure of a man;' it
is the unravelling of a process
- a fictional account of how
CIA-style intelligence , is gath-
ered. I don't need* to tell you
how difficult it is for a process
to win our admiration, much
less our affection.
Topaz tells the story behind
the headlines (quite literally at
the picture's end) of the Cuban
Missile Crisis. Defectors. Spies.
Reconnaissance. Castro. T h e
scene shifts between the Amer-
ican intelligence network head-
ed by Michael Nordstrom (John
Forsythe) and the French net-
work where Andre Devereaux
(Frederick Stafford) is nominal-
ly connected with the American
effort. While it seems highly
improbable, t h o u g h knowing
this country, not impossible, the
Americans need the Frenchman
to Journey to Cuba to corrobo-
rate information on the pres-
ence of missiles.
The plot-line is no great
shakes, but I was carried along
by the sheer momentum of the
AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES
PROGRAM LECTURE
Ma r

thing and, as a matter of fact,
for all its faults I really liked
it. It certainly isn't Hitchcock's
best, but it isn't his worst eith-
er. And I was very pleased to
see so few of the shoddy process
shots that have blemished his
other recent films. There are
enough little touches here to
show you his genius, but he has
forgotten a lesson he once knew
well - a film cannot live on
suspense alone.
If I may say a word about
Oh! What a Lovely War now
playing at the Campus Theater.
I reviewed it when it played on
Moratorium Day and was dis-
appointed. It is an error in con-
ception rather than in execu-
tion. Somehow in all the fun and
games, my moral sensibilities
were never shaken. I don't need
so graphic an illustration of
war's insanity as a dancing gen-
eral. What e v e r happened to
subtlety?

(Black Panther Party)
HILL AUDITORIUM
Presented by
CONFERENCE ON REPRESSION
Ticket Soles
- - - --Begin b2

UNION LOBBY
$2.50 3.00 3.50
Sponsored by
inter
Cooperative
Council

4

"""""

Barry Primus: A criminal of sorts

musicy--
Beyond Hog Farm psychedelia

Dial 8-6416
ENDS WEDNESDAY.
;;Wf ARA T
PmwIacr
*Thursday@
"NANAMI"

I

TON IGH T AT 8:00!
THE UNIVERSITY.:
OF MICHitGAN O*QQQiO*@
PRFESSIONALI

By JOE PEHRSON
Live performances of elec-
tronic' music are few and far
between. The idiom is new, and
normally good pieces for tape
are simply not available. Con-
temporary Directions, the School
of Music's forum for contem-
porary works, devoted a full pro-
gram last Saturday night to this
particularly type of new music,
and clearly showed its poten-
tia4for use in mixed media.
Good mixed media is also
hard to come by. Usually no one
bothers to coordinate sound
and visual effects, and most
performances degenerate to Hog.
Farm psychedelia. The perform-
ance of Bulent Arel's Capriccio
for TV was; something quite dif-
ferent. The stage of Rackham
Aud. was converted into a gigan-
tic movie screen on which flash-
ed carefully staged movements
of the human form. Video tape
presents a possibility for mul-
tiple imagery, and since this was
a film transcription of a work.
done for tape,. images could se-
perate and become transparent
.imitations of the original forms.
All this was done ..in colors
which changed with the mood
of the tape material. The elec-
tronic sounds were somewhat
too dependent on the TV ma-
terial, but this is the first time
I have ever seen an attempt at
this type of synthesis.
The pieces for electronic tape
were of varying quality. The
first piece presented - On by
Robert Morris was a disappoint-
ment. The electronic music stu-
dio at the University is not
elaborate, and perhaps this ac-
counts for some of the simplic-
ity , of this work. Electronic
sounds were presented - and
only that. Electronic music is
.not quite that new, and the
"groovys" and "heavys" that
Morris must expect after each
new sound were simply not
present.
Burdock Birds by Jon Apple-
ton was perhaps the best com-
posed electronic piece heard in
this concert. High-pitched mod-
ulated sine waves, imitating
birds, served as the central fo-
cns of this work. Every sound

was well integrated in the com-
position, and although the piece
was only in stereo (rather than
four-speaker) Appleton has a
fine sense of spatial possibili-
ties. Appleton is currently the
director of the Electronic Music
Studio at Dartmouth and this
woik is an extremely r e c e n t
one (1969). Originally perform-
ed out of doors (where it ac-
tually belongs) it forms a
strange electronic antiphony to
natural bird songs.
Cambrian Sea by P e t e r
Klausmeyer was composed last
year at the University's facility.
Although the wor1 is overstated
in places, Klausmeyer has man-
aged to evoke an image of an
active i sea, breaking against
electronic b a r r i e r s. Staccato
sounds suggest a bubbling lava
flow and we are certain his sea
would be less enticing to bath-
ers than Lake Michigan.
Time Being by Russell Peck
was the second mixed media
work presented in the concert.
It included both a live performer
(Joseph D'Onofrio -violin) and
a dancer (Linda Ellis). All the
taped sounds were amplified
imitations of the performed vio-
lin sounds, and it seemed as if
D'Onofrio's pitches became ex-
tended through space to the four
corners of the auditorium. The

movements of Linda Ellis were
constrained-she seemed as an-
xiodis to escape from her body
as the sounds were anxious to
escape from their central-source,
the "violin of O'Onofrio. All in
all, a very thoughful work in
many media.
Schaum by Terence Kinkaid
(also composed on this campus)
ssemed to lack character. Some
of the sounds were unusually
well done, but the work was tedi-
ous. Kinkaid hopes to add other
media to this work Perhaps when
this is completed his purpose
will become clearer.
Golden Wedding by Gerald,
Plain combined concrete sounds
(a music box and banjo) with
sawtooth waves-which if prop-
erly taped will resemble a string
sound. Unfortunately, this was
not a happy marriage - unity
was lacking.
Leave it to William Albright
to out-freak anything on any
program. As vocalist for Robert
Ashley's The Wolfman, Albright
yelped an accompaniment to a
mono tape which dwindled in
comparison. This Listerine de-
livery was somewhat marred by
Albright's irritating gasps for
breath, but we can expect little
more from a composition with
no bite and so much bark.

JANUARY 26 -31
I Prefe alwnsl remierI

I

U

Jos TRIANA'S

BACH CLUB
presents
DAVID LIPSON
(genius/prodigy) speaking on
"BACH'S SUITE MUSIC"
with LIVE PERFORMANCE
on Piano
Refreshments and FUN afterwards
WED., JAN. 28, 8 P.M.
1236 Washtenaw (at S. Forest,
near S. Univ.). Everybody wet-
come! (No musical knowledge
needed). For transportation or
further info. call 761-7356,
665-6806, 769-2003, 761-
4260.

I

S

"First Play from Revolutionary
Cuba I"
"Rebellion of Youth
Against Aged~
"Guerrilla War Against socie.1ty
"Social Revolution Against
Tyranny!"

I

London Times

r

Directed by DAYD WHEELER
. TICKETS AT PTP BOX OFFCE
WEEKDAYS: 10-1, 2 - P.M.

1

i.

r.

NO 2-6264

H ELD OVER!
2nd WEEK.. .
SHOWS AT -
1 :00-3:05-5:10-7: 15-9:30

Prof. Charles V.
Hamilton
Columbia University
Co-Author with Stokely Car-
michael of Black Power: The
Politics of Liberation in America
"Institutional Racism
in America'7
Tes., ian. 27
8:00 P.M.
Rockham Auditorium

The Most Explosive Spy Scanidal of the Century!
,, H'7CUCOCKS
a~
A('VRSLPCUR /EHNCLR

He1lgdl

I

i

11

l

I

TU ES.-WED.

I. I ¢ , d:,
t' i - ~ f~

/11

American Studies

Film Nights

U

1 I

=

iii

'°TE

i

6s.L.......,m

r

-U

. ...

I

I,

:.V

x

OFFICE HOURS
CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLAINTS -9 a.m. - 11 :304a.m.
SUBSCRIPTIONS - 1 p.m. - 3 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS - 764-0557
10a.m. - 3 p.m.
DEADLINE FOR NEXT DAY - 12:30 p'm.
DISPLAY ADS - 764-0554
MONDAY -9 n.m. -4 .m.

Te Geeral
Buster Keaton
"If the Cinema is an
Art, who is the art-
ist?"

U

RADICAL
FILM SERIES

TEN DAYS THAT SHOOK

Presents

I

,;.,
_
E
4 2
5 S
A

THE WORLD
Directed by: SERGE EISENSTEIN

(also known as OCTOBER)
SILENT 1928

F'OX EASTERN TEATRES
FOX VILLBG
375 No.MAPLE RD. -7691300,
MON.-FRI.-7:15-9:15
SAT. & SUN.-1 :30-3:20-
5:15-7:15-9:15

" . among the movie offerings . . . indisputably the most significant . . , replete with magnificent scenes of mass movement,
with amazingly observed characters, and with extremely striking and beautiful camera shots . . . a brilliant director."-Nation
"...,epic substance . .."-TheatreArts
Ten Days That Shook the World is a film classic. It portrays the Russian Revolution as seen by Eisenstein, himself a participant in
the Revolution, who in the years which followed became the foremost film director in Russia. It was made as an "intellectual film"
-an example of Communist art.
"TL. .-- c.n rf n.a k rrs urt, ti nnurctic one: it nurpose is solely to produce convictions and to lead to actions. Dur-

I

R

I

I I

U

I

II'

®E

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan