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January 24, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-24

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THE MtCHEGAN DAILY

Saturdays January 24, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, January 24, 1970

art

Faculty art show: Modern

mixed

media

ATTENTION AL UNNDERGRAO WOMEN!
Here's your chance for a night out
at the courtesy of Elliot House
on tan. 24 at 8:00 PM.
Dining Roam 3, M~rkley Hall
Featuring: Dancing, Bananasplit Bu h, Refreshments
Music by Bobby Sox and the U-Trow
Another Babcock-Neaton Production-"We serve to please"

By LAURIE HARRIS
A conglomeration of both the
media and subject tending to
exemplify modernity lay the
groundwork for the faculty art
show currently being held in the
Museum of Art in Alumni Me-
morial Hall.
The show allows for a new
interpretation of the conven-
tional watercolor, lithograph,
oil painting and sculpture. But
it has also displayed an intri-
guing handling of ceramic,
epoxy, burnt wrappings, ma-
crame, metals and acrylic paints.
Small cow bells jingle from a
wwll hanging of intricately tied
knots in the art of macrame by
Gerald Hodge. William Lau has
placed the usual gayly colored
Fisher-Price plastic toys into a
looming, ceramic phallic symbol
called "Game."
Epoxy sculpture taking on the
effect of hardened wax is cre-
ated by Ted Ramsay.! And there
is even an interpretation of a
soft, billowing cloud in styrene
lit from behind by an electric
light by John Thomson.
Susan Crowell has created
several works in fine, smooth
porcelain. "Breastplate," a pun
on the term, is a dinner plate
with five female breasts cluster-
ed on top of each other. Robert .
Stull has built up two enormous
black, vases with weighty, al-
most impregnable lids.
Thomas McClure's sculpture
in bronze is strong and dynamic
in its interpretation of "Eve."
But the theme of the show is
definitely modern and the trend
is to pun on the expected pr to
represent everyday themes in
the new media of today.
Milton Cohen's poster calls
attention to a show in his own
studio that is considered to be
p rt of this exhibit. Cohen's
studio is located at 617 East
Liberty and the exhibit hours
arw 8 to 9:30 Monday and Wed-
nesday evenings.
Th3 portion of the snow in the
museum will run through Feb. 8.
The hours are daily from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. except Wednesday
(9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) and Sunday
(2 to 5 p.m.)

#1+

5th Week
Shows at
1,3,5,7,9

DIAL
5-6290

William Faulkner's Pulitzer Prize-Winning
Novel "The Reivers" is now a film!
"'The Reivers' fills one with a
joyous sense of life and laugh- .
ter. A marvelous time is had by
oll."-New York Magazine

Susan Crowell's "Breastplate"

Steve McQueen
*Th Reivers'

Md

U'

ALIENA TED?

'Sr

~9

'V,

Lau and Robert Stull

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The flexible Nikolais concert

By C. Q. SPINGLER
Fantastic collages of color vi-
brated on the syclorama, across
and o v e r the dancers of the
Nikolais Dance' Theatre Wed-
nesday night. Scenery created
pf mobile metal units, elastic
bands and a floating tent sus-
pended in mid-air were used
sometimes as props, sometimes
as costumes, sometimes as a sta-
ble scenic u n i t. Movement,
space, light, sculpture and sound
were fused into a brilliant ex-
ample of Total Theatre.
The final product was so
- alive and innovative that it
would be ludicrous to review
this company iri conventional
dance terminology such as
"tecnbque." It proved t h a t
dance can be, ,is, in the United
4States, one of the most advanc-
ed and accomplished of the per-
forming arts.
Incredible flexibility, not on-
ly physical suppleness, but men-
tal agility (plus the ability to
respond to other dancers, to
create, and com.municate this
vibrant energy to the audience)
characterized the performance
of the dancers. Humour, wit,
political and social comment
followed one another with such
rapidity that the audience was
constantly alert, challenged and
delighted. Each dance was com-
plete unto itself, an image as
profound, symbolic and clearly
defined as a poem by Valery.
The dance Mantis created an
, image of the insect world, Nou-

menon, a t h i n g perceived or,
metaphysically ('according to
Webster) an object of purely
rational apprehension bodied
forth the inexplicable transfor-
mations of a large viscous mass.
Three red mummified, yet def-
initely feminine shapes, never
quite human, constantly chang-
ing shape in irregular rhythms,
composed the multi-dimensional
image patterns of the dance.
In the finale, Tent, the danc-
ers first appear in white me-
chanic-type overalls, bearing a
long piece of cloth which be-
comes a tent under which one
could dance. Then a costume
for seven people through which
only masked heads appear dis-
,connected from bodies, through
which feet appear, then feet
and masks and masked feet all
creating images of torture,.an-
guish and Eden. The tent aclecd
as{ a shield for costume changes,
so extraordinarily illuminated
that it looked like liquid, was a
mirage, both lyric and grotes-
que and transformed the stage
Into a miriad of locations and
atmospheres. T'he tent w as a
simple element made complex
by a fusion of light, movement,
space and electronic sound.
In the dance Tensile Involve-
ment, festoons of elastic bands
were manipulated by the dane-
ers into geometrical forms sug-
gestive of the most modern
sculptors and designers.
Surely the work of Alvin Nik-
olais, choreographer, composer,

costumer, lighting technician
and; scene designer is that of a
J m a n of genius. It illustrates
that Dance Theatre can be the
most expressive and dynamic of
spectacles, for, dance is a sep-
erate language, capable of in-
venting entirely new images
which have emerged entire from
artists imagination and which
defy verbal expression.
NATIONAl. *ENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTENThEATES
FOX VILLBG
375 No.MAPLE RD.-"7694i300
MON.-FRI.--7:15-9:15
SAT. & SUN.-1 :30-3:20-
5:15-7:15-9:15
"THE YEAR'S BEST COMEDY !"
SATURDAY RENJEW
Bob Car

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PAUL NEWMAN PATRICIA NEAL
MELVYN DOUGLAS
in
HUD
Newman's great portrayal of the archetypal anti-hero
JANUARY 23-24
AUD A 7:00 & 9:30 7 5c (very little)
NEXT WEEK
Bergman's SHAME

Information
Dial
NO 2-6264

t.. i

/

JAN. 31-FEB. 1

SATURDAY-SUN DAY

A FRANKOVICH PRODUCTION
FOR COLUMBIA RELEASE

SHOWS..AT
1:00, 305, 5:10
7:15 & 9:30 P.M.

r

Conference on Repression
Teach-in/discussions/response workshops
Repression in this country takes many forms. It can be blatant violence or censorship, or
it can be subtle, institutionalized repression that people do not even notice because
they have Learned to live with it or because they are not a member of a group at which
it is directed. The leadership of the Black Panther Party has been decimated, 28 of
them murdered, and similar actions will be taken against other groups, both white and
black. Those who successfully criticize the government (e.g. the "Chicago 8") are jailed
or shot. People work at meaningless, impersonal jobs, where they are conditioned not
to think or question authority, as are students in most schools. The repression is increas-
ing; it is becoming much less subtle and much more violent. Everyone must understand
what this means and how to combat it NOW. Come to the conference.

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SPEAKERS: SATURDAY
David Hilliard

(SAT. CON'T.)
Arthur Kinoy
(Law partner with William
Kuntzler of Chicaao ConsOiracy)

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