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January 08, 1970 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 8, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, January 8, 1970

W.V
W H Y
is ULRICH'S Ann Arbor's busiest bookstore ?
THERE must be a GOOD Reason-

Lets Talk It Over .
- * r "
I
-1 ~ln

Cagers, leers
Basketball squad goes 3-3 g
By MORT NOVECK margin at the half. All the starters
Continuing to play better bas- were removed by the end of the
ketball than anyone expected be- game, giving many of the Michi-
fore the season began the Michi- gan reserves an opportunity to
gan cage squad compiled a 3-3 play.
record' over the vacation period.
This puts their overall record at Tigers trounced
5-5 for the season and 1-1 in the Overcoming an eight point
Big Ten. After losing their games halftime deficit the Wolverine
to Duke and Utah the Wolverines cagers won their second straight,
came 'back to defeat Butler, defeating the Princeton Tigers by
Princeton and Northwestern be- an 80-72 margin after trailing by'
fore bowing to Iowa. as much as 16 points in their New
Year's Eve contest. Michigan was
Duke wins forced to the bench early in the
Six-foot ten Randy Denton game and Coach John Orr credited
poured 27 points in and guard reserve forwards Wayne Grabeic
Dick Devenzio hit on several key and Bill Fraumann with saving
free throws to spark Duke's Blue the squad in the first half.
Devils to a 73-68 come from be- Rodney Fqrd came to life in
hind triumph over Michigan in a the second half and hit for 15
game played December 10 at the points in the period. Michigan
events building. employed a pressing defense in
The Wolverines could not over- the period which the Tigers
come ice cold shooting nights by couldn't handle. Geoff Petrie was
their two leading players, D a n the game's high scorer with 34 fol-
Fife and Rudy Tomjanovich. Fife lowed by Rudy Tomjanovich with
missed on n i n e of eleven shots 33.
and Tomjanovich scored his sea-
son low of twenty points and fail- Wildcats -whipped
ed to connect on 12 of his 18 field Opening the Big Ten season with
goal attempts. a win on the road the Wolverines
defeated the Northwestern Wild-F
Utah triumphant i cats 96-92 on Jan. 3. In addition
Despite Rudy Tomjanovich's 42 to being Michigan's first Big Ten
Ipoint effort the Wolverines camewioftesanit asH d
out second in a scoring duel with Coach John Orr's first win in
the University of Utah 117-102. Northwestern's McGaw Memoriale
The scoring pace w a s so quick Hal in his seven years in the Big
that in one 75 second period 16 Ten.
points were scored. The Wildcat's Dale Kelley was

gain

Icers struggle to 4-3 record
By BILL DINNER the first half and we controlled it
The Michigan hockey team, still in the second half," was the way
lacking cohesiveness, struggled Renfrew summed it up.
through the holiday season with Earlier in the evening Minne-
a 4-3 total, boosting their overall sota sweeped the Buckeyes off the
record to 7-6. ice, outshooting 41-18( and rack-
Michigan, in the nightcap of ing up the only shutout of the
the opening doubleheader of the tourney 4-0.
Big Ten Tournament, easily out- The Gophers, however, couldn't
distanced the Buckeyes, 7-2. keep their dandruff up as they
In the opening game freshman succumbed to Michigan State in
Jimmy Johnson slapped in his the finals 6-3.
second goal of the season to give In the consolation game, there
the Badgers an overtime 4-3 vic-| was little suspense over who would
tory over the Gophers. win but rather who would win the
Although Michigan outscored fight.
the Buckeyes 49-26 the contest The Wolverines pretty much
was in sharp contrast to a gruel- settled the first question with four
ing hard-checking struggle be- goals in the first period.
tween Wisconsin and Minnesota. The second question stemmed
The Wolverines were, to say the from the somewhat questionable
least, sloppy in their opening cic- officiating. The contest had been
tory. marred by numerous scuffles and
Buckey Straub and Michel skirmishes throughout and it was
Jarry starred for the Wolverines, not until all but 25 seconds re.
each netting two goals. The game, mained in the game that the
however, was in sharp contrast to brawl erupted.
the Buckeyes' last appearance here Michigan's Paul Gamsby bar-
in 1964, when Michigan as na- relled into goalie Bill Bidon with
tional champions demolished Ohio stick high, and was rewarded for
State 21-0. his efforts when Rick Yurick
Wolverine coach Al Renfrew cracked a stick that broke his
noted that, "It was a tough game helmet and sent him to the ice.
to play. When you play a team Thereupon Yurick pounced on
you think you're better than, you him. Within second the whole ice
have a tendancy not to do very was a mass of brawls.
well." After the game Renfrew com-
Michigan came mighty close in mented that, "It was the worst
their second clash against eventu- officiated game I ever saw."
al winner Michigan State. Michigan, in the St. Louis In-
The Wolverines were down 5-1 vitational with Wisconsin, Yale
in the second period, but surged and Brown once again sloppily
back to down-one when Dave Per- and ended up with a split losing
rin tallied on a wrist shot with 12 to Wisconsin 5-3, while beating
minutes in the third period. Yale 6-3.
A shot by Mickey Shaw that The Wolverines ended the holi-
caroomed off the post could have days with a split at North Dakota
tied it up with two minutes re- 9-2 and 5-1.
maining and the Wolverines kept Renfrew summed up the vaca-
the puck inside the blue line until tion period noting, "We hadn't
the end, but to no avail. practiced at all before the Big Ten
Perrin and Shaw shared the red and with ten new members, we
light honors with two apiece. simply haven't played enough to-
"They controlled the puck in gether."

vacation

splits

1~

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Butler bounced
Rebounding from two con-
secutive defeats the Wolverine
cagers made easy work of their
victory over Butler, winning 105-
65. After a slow start the Wolver-
ines caught fire and began to pull
away steadily, leading by a 59-35

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high scorer in the contest with 35
points. The Wolverine's best ef-
forts came from Bird Carter and
Dan Fife who hit for 24 apiece.
Northwestern's Don Adams hit
for 23 in the losing effort but the
Wildcats shot only 45.3 per cent
from the floor while Michigan
managed a more respectable 54.8
per cent.
Hawkeyes holler
Unable to keep Iowa's hot shoot-
ers in check the Wolverine's drop-
ped the Big Ten home opener to
the Hawkeyes, 107-99. Behind
throughout most of the gaie the
Wolverines were forced to play
catch up ball but Iowa's hot shoot-
ing didn't give them a chance to
pull ahead.
The Wolverine's went into a
press in the second half attempt-
ing to stop the Hawks scoring, but
were unsuccessful. Iowa shot 63.4
per cent from the floor and always
managed to get a man clear to
shoot.
Rudy Tomjanovich was top
scorer in the game with 37 points
followed by the Hawkeye's John
Johnson with 34. Chad Calabria
added 24 for Iowa with Fred
Brown hitting for 23.
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Bird Carter goes over the Hawks

A SURPRISING SECOND

Grapplers floor foes in tourney

By PAT ATKINS

totaled 68 points.

All this was

Michigan wrestlers ambushed
the rest of the country over the
holidays in a sneak attack worthy
of a John Wayne movie, finishing
second on the heels of'Michigan
State in the classic Midwest Open.
Competition came from over 450
wrestlers, including Big Ten cham-
pions, Big Eight champions, and
NCAA champions, to form the
roughest collegiate wrestling tour-
nament in the nation. And the
Wolverine grapplers upstaged even
Oefending national champion Iowa
State.
Days later on Jan. 5, the Wol-
verines knocked off a tenacious
New York Maritime College team
in a dual meet 19-15.
"We were certainly the surprise
of the tournament," Assistant
Coach Rick Bay said. "Everyone
had heard about our loss to Pitts-
burgh and our tie with Maryland,"
he continued,. "but we showed the
group that if we do put everything
together we can be tough."
ON THE STRENGTH of a first
place crown for Jerry Hoddy at
118, runner-up finishes by 150-
pounder Lane Headrick and 177-
pounder Jesse Rawls, and fourth
place slots for Tim Cech at 126
and Mark King at 142, Michigan

without the aid of Big Ten cham-
pion Lou Hudson out with a knee
injury.
Michigan State was a narrow
first with 76, Iowa State looked up
from third with X62 points, Okla-
hyoma came next with 58, and
Northwestern held down a fifth
place tie with 23 points.
Others in the top ten were the
Mayor Daley Atheltic Club, 23;
Winona.State, 21; Eastern Michi-
gan, 20; Muskegon Community
College, 18; and Iowa, 15.
GOING INTO the last round,
Michigan trailed the Spartans by
six points and still had a shot at
first place. "It was a long shot,"
Bay noted, "but mathematically
we had more than a small chance.
"If Rawls, Headrick, King, and
Cech had won their matches and
the State wrestlers had lost, we
could have pulled it out. We're not
complaining about our perform-
ance, though," he emphasized.
Nor should they. Junior Jerry
Hoddy w r e s t 1 e d exceptionally,
taking five bouts on his rout to
first, including decisions over
Michigan State's Lon Hicks in the
semi-finals and over Norm Wil-
kerson of Iowa State in the finals.
And both Headrick and Rawls'
fell just short of first place fin-

ishes. "Headrick wrestled better
than he ever has before," Bay
stated. "He won the first five bouts
all convincingly before being
beaten by Ron Ouellet of Michigan
State in overtime on a referee's
decision."
Rawls also bested five opponents
to reach the finals. Ahead of Iowa
State's Chuck Jean, defending na-
tional chamlion, with 33 seconds
to go in the finals, Rawls ran out
of gas and was pinned. "He was
just a hair shy of conditioning."
In the quarterfinals Rawls had
downed former NCAA champion
from Ohio State, Dave Reinbolt;
and in the semifinals he took out
the defending Big Eight champion
from Oklahoma State, Gerald
Winnard.
SOPHOMORE MARK King was
stopped 'in the semifinals after
four wins "on a fall that was kind
of an accident. He got caught in
a silly hold," Bay said.
The silly hold was achieved by
a serious wrestler, Big Ten champ
from Michigan State, Keith Low-
rance, at 1:57. One of King's wins
was a fall over Joe Carstenson of
Iowa.
The other five Michigan point
getters, Ty Belknap at 134, Jim
Sanger at 158, Tom Quinn at 167,
Therlon Harris at 190, and fresh-

man Rick Bolhouse at heavy-
weight each won at least t w o
matches apiece before elimin~tion.
Michigan's first dual meet win
of the season came last Monday
against New York Maritime Col-
lege. But a late car containing
Hoddy, George Surgent, H a r r i s,
and Sanger, forced Michigan to
juggle line-up classes. With Hoddy
not yet at the meet, the two teams
began the clash with the 126
match.
"THE TEAM is used to a cer-
tain order," Bay said, "and wrest-
ling 126 first was upsetting be-
cause of this. No one knew when
they were going to wrestle."
Weight classes of 118, 158 and
167 were skipped before the four
wrestlers arrived during the 177-
pound match. The three bouts were
then completed, and Michigan
held a slim one point lead going
into the last two matches. A
draw by Harris at 190 kept the
meet in balance until the f i n a l
match.
Then Rick Bolhouse paced John
Reid to a 3-3 tie entering the third
period. With Reid up, Bolhouse
escaped. A desparate lunge by
Reid as time ran out gave Bol-
house a takedown to clinch the
bout and meet win for Michigan
19-15.

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