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January 21, 1970 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAISY

Wednesdc Y. Januory 21, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, January 2'I, 1970

Dirty' Phoenix anarchists wash

hnemseives o estructive image

By JASON STEINMAN
Any FBI agent attending t h e
Phoenix Anarchists' meeting 1 a s t
night in the SAB might have been
surprised. There was no mad rant-
ing about destruction, no Molotov
cocktails, just a black flag stuck
into a dirty washing machine agi-
tator. "We're dirty agitators our-
selves," explained Pat Kobalik.
Phoenix began last June when
four members allegedly were purg-
ed from SDS for refusing alleg-
iance to Communism. "We do not
support any state, whether com-
mies or Marxists," said K e n,
Thomson. '70. Consequently
Phoenix has no officers.
"We believe government should

not run anything. At their best
governments are a redundant
nuisance and at their worst a tyr-
anny," said Miss Kobalik.
Since its inception, Phoenix has
followed a three step plan. Its
first semester was spent educating
the original four members about
group dynamics, oratory, wea-
ponry and codes. The second se-
mester was devoted to educating
the fifty new members who had
joined in the interim. The third
segment of the plan is action.
Its first plan for action relates
to water purification. Members
plan an investigation of the city
purification facilities, which they
call inadequate.

Administrator may
vote on store panel

(Continued from Page 1) j
istrator has no vote, SGC is ex-I
pected to ask for a revision of the
request to the tax commission.,
If, on the other hand, the voting
administrator is deemed necessary
for the exemption, SGC would re-
guest the Regents to add another
student to the policy board.
Council member Mike - Farrell
says such a move would be neces-
sary to guarantee the students a
majority on the board. Otherwise,

TU gain
bargaining
recognition
(Continued from Page 1)
Associated Apt. as well as TU.
members who are not."
While the Tenants Union lead-
ers describe Associated Apart-
ments' housing conditions as
"above the Ann Arbor average,'
TU member and Associated Apt.
tenant, Henry Langberg, ex-
plained why Forsythe's recognition
is so important to the Tenants
Union.
"The main goal of the Tenants
Union is a remedy for the Ann
A r bor housing problems.. For-
sythe's statements are a first step
to the power we need to attempt
this remedy."
The Tenants Union will be
travelling to Lansing tomorrow to
picket the office of landlord Louis'
Rome, who is the Michigan Crime
Commissioner:

he explains, the three faculty'
members, the administrator and
one of the six student members
could team up to deadlock the
board 5-5.
But whether the administrator
is kept as a non-voting member of
the board or a student is added
to the board to "compensate," the
original tax ruling would be nulli-
fied, according to Ben Holderied,
deputy commissioner of sales and
use tax.
"If there's going to be any
change in the facts as stated in
the brief (requesting the exemp-
tion), we would want to review
the case again," he says.
According to Holderied, the tax
?xemption was granted to the
bookstore because, as required by
law, it qualified as an educational
institution operating on a non-
.profit. basis. "The bookstore is
clearly an agent of the University.
of Michigan," he explains.
However, he also declines to
speculate on whether tlie addition
of a student or the removal of the
administrator's vote would stop
the tax commission from granting
' the exemption.

After the investigation the '
group plans to enlighten people
about the causes of water impuri-,
ties. Part of the problem, Phoenix
believes, stems from the govern-
ment which they say is diverting
funds that should be used for
purification.3
'The inevitable result of a
state is a shitty environment,"
said Thomson. "All governments
are set up for perpetuating them-
selves. They do things to people,
coercively, not for them, will-!
ingly."
The problem lies in the people,
too, Thomson maintains. Since
they have been educated by the
public educational system spon-
sored by the government, they are
deceived-blinded to the state's
usurption of their rights.
Phoenix feels that when the
people have been enlightened, a~
massive resistance will follow. "We
do not plan a Che Guevera mna- i
chine gun revolution," said Thom-
son. "There is enough freedom of
speech and action that we can ac-
complish our goals without vio-
lence."
When the people resist, Thom-
son said, troops normally used to
coerce them back into social
norms will follow suit and also
rebel.
At that point the government
would be dissolved, and complete
freedom of will concerning prop-
erty and economy would be es-
tablished, he added.
"This is the basic libertarian
ethic," said Kobalik. "Live and let
live. Release ,the people from the
cultural, physical and mental
bonds of the government."
With the complete dissolution
of bureaucracy, the group then
reasoned, people would have com-
plete freedom and would be able
to rule their lives as they wished,
without coercion.
Despite the fact that "the FBI is
listening to every word we say,"
the Phoenix Anarchists were quite
open with their comments. They
felt that in order to have open
mass meetings indicative of the
anarchist theme of freedom, you
.have to expose yourself.

(Continued from Page 1)
and the implementation law:
school experiment "coincidental."
"When we decided to hold a
meeting to see how many students
were interested in pass-fail, we
didn't even know about the pro-
posal," said Nowack.
However, the organizers are not
very happy with the Law School's
response to the pass-fail question.
"We think the experiment is very
asks parity
on Vad board
(Continued from Page 1)
IhCreation of student parity on
the hearing boards was also ac-
eeptable to Lasser, who contended,
that these boards would be un-
likely to ever judge a disruption
case due to the testimony of the
administrative board to consider
such a case.
Michael Davis, grad, pointed out
that any judicial body which con-
tained faculty members could not
legitimately decide a non-acade-
mic case.
Central Student Judiciary, the
University's highest student court,
would 'be forced to overturn any
.cision appealed from a student-
faculty disciplinary board because
such a board is unconstitutional
according to the Student Bill of
Rights, Davis said. Such a decision
would deny a student's right to
trial by peers, he added.
Several other students empha-
sired the University-wide impor-
tance of the subcommittee's pro-
posal. "There must be a concerted
effort on the parts of all the gov-
srnments of all the schools and
colleges for more student repre-
sentation," said Farrell.!

r
c
A
1

program might have on Law 7
School educationalhprocesses. It is' Generat N otiees
not a plan that might be proposed! Ren
_Rgents fiteeting: Feb. 19 and 2q.

Y! CPemen1t riteC
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Interview at the Journalism Depart-

3
!<
p

a a£,aasav f.a la . ' i. .7 l , L .
for permanent .implementation,"' Communications for consideration at-
said Cooperrider. this meeting must be in the Presi-a
sThecommridee.S adent's hands not later than Feb. 5.
Thecmitee is a standing **
committee of the Law School, L.S.&A. CONCENTRATION PROGRAM
created last fall, and is composed MEETINGS FOR SOPHOMORES
of five faculty and two students. American Culture, Wed.. Jan. 28, 4
The idea for the pass-fail . p - pin. 1007 Angers Hall: Anthropology,
Sexperi- Wed., Jan. 28, 4 p.m., 2235 Angell Hall,
ment originated through commit- *Biology, Tues. Jan. 27, 5:10 p.m., 229
tee discussions last fall. Angell Hall; Business Administration,
Nowack admitted that much of Wed. Feb. 4, 4 p.m., 2235 Angeli Hall;
heir success hinged on tonight's Chemistry Building; Classical Studies,
meeting. "We're really not that or- Thurs. Feb. 5, 4 p.m., 1007 Angell Hall.
ganized," said Nowack. Economics, wed., Jan. 28, 4 p.m., 2003
"A lot will depend on the turn- AngeliHall; English, Tues. Jan. 27. 4
out nd n th idas epresedp m., 2235 Angeli Hall; English T. C..
out and hon the ideas expressed Tuesday, Feb. 3, 4 p.m., 2003 Angell
at tonight's meeting," he said. Hall; French and French T.C., Mon.,

-

:.. " :: .::.:".:.:";:a:.... .:.......::;.".;:::: Feb .2, 4 p.m., 2003 Angell Hall; Geo-°
".graphy, Mon., Feb. 2, 7:30 p.m., 4560.
SAILYT OFFICIAL LS&A Building: Geology & Mineralogy,
Wed., Feb. 4, 4 p.m., 2003 Angell Hall,
German, Wed. Feb. 4, 4:10 p.m., 1007
BULLETIN Angell Hall: History and History T.C.,,
Tues. Jan. 27, 4 p.m., 2225 Angell Hall:
s p a ss:fa.l T .:....................iiA,:.?::::.........iaHistory and History T.C., Mon., Feb.;
2, 4 p.m., 2225 Angell Hall; History of
TeDaily Olfficial Bulletin is an Art,.. Tues., Feb. 3, 4 p.m., 2235 Angell
olfcia pulictio oftheUnier Hall; Journalism, Wed., Jan. 2$, 4 p~m.,+
experimental, a bit too cautious," city of Michigan. Notices should be 4205 Angell Hall; Linguistics, Wed., Feb.
said Philip Mattia, another or- md sent in TYPEWRITTEN f r n to ;4 4 p.m., 4205 Angell Hall.
Room 352$ L. S. A Bld g ., before
ganizer. 2 p.m., ofthe day preceding pub- Mathematics, wed. Jan. 28, 4 p.m.,
Mattia said he objects to the lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for 2225 Angell Hall: Mathematics T. C., ;
experimental program because he Saturday and Sunday. Items ap- Tues., Feb. 3, 4 p.m., 2225 Angell Hall;
bxeietalprogm bea sh1 pear once only. Student organiza- Microbiology, Mon., Feb. 2, 4 p.m., 1007 :
believes that might take along tion notices are not accepted for Angell Hall; Philosophy, Mon., Jan. 26,
time before such an experiment publication. F o r more informa- 4 p.m., 2003 Angell Hall: Physics, Fri.,j
would develop into a permanent tihn, phone 764-270. Feb. 6. 4 pm., Physics-Astronomy Build- '
program. He said it was his im-
pression that a resulting pass-fail wvEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21 Political Science, Mon., Feb. 2, 4 p.m..,
1025 Angell Hall: Pre-legal, Mon.. Jan.
program would be very limited no ! JQ y tflfc.lend P 26, 5 p.n. 1025 Angell Hall:Pre-med
matter hpw successful the experi- ' D e C q and Pre-dent., Wed. Jan. 28, 7:30 p.m.,
Physics Dept. General Colloquium: 1025 Angell Hall; Psychology Mon. Jan.
mn.R. H. Sands, "Iron, Sulfur, Spinach 26, 4 p.mn.. 231 Angell Hall.
However, Law Prof. Luke Cooper- and Rubble" P & A Colloquium Rin. 4 Russian & East European. wed.Feb.
rider, chairman of the committee 4:00 p.m. 4 4 p.m., Commons Roaom, Lane Hall:
on academic standards and In zoology Seminar: Dr. Norman Briggs, Sociology Thurs., Jan. 29. 4 p.m., 2235
centives which developed the pass- 'Univ.of Pittsburgh Sch. of Medicine, Angell Hall; Social Work, Tues. Jan. 27,
"Site of Calcium Action inathe Reguna- 5 p.m., 3527 Frieze Building: Spanish
fail experiment, Said the faculty t ion of Mtuscular Contraction" 1400 T. C., Thurs. Feb. 5, 4 p.m., 3231 Angell'
had made no commitment towards Chemistry Bldg., 4:00 p.m. Hall: Speech, Thurs. Jan. 29, 4 p.m.,
pass-fail in any form and was Botany Seminar: Dr. BMruce Leven-; 231 Angell Hall: Zoology, Wed. Jan. 28.
nberg, "Studies on Urea Amidolyase, a 5 p.m., 3028 Natural Science.
entirely open and neutral On the new Biotin Enzyme Concerned with Bachelor of General Studies, Individ- ;
subject," Urea Metabolism in Yeast and Blue- ual Concentration, Liberal Studies, on
In addition, Cooperrider said Green Alaae" - 1139 Natural Science Thurs., Jan. 29, 4 p.m., 1025 Angell
"the committee intended the pass- lAdg., 4:15 p.m. Hall.
fail rs tThe Sanley Quartet: Gilbert R o ss5, e Students panning to major ir Bo
program as a survey." h violin: Gustave Roesseelsviolin; Ro-og mutaen t o nntrion-
"W'etyingt gain infor ma- ;Bert Courte, viola and Jerome Je- meeting.
tion on student attitudes toward l inek, cello: Rackham Lecture Hall,____
pass~fail and waj.t pat n h a {ao ~"''1 "

'menit on Wednesday, Jtan. 21, e a l1
764-0420 to make appointment:
Milwaukee Journal, managing edi-
tor visiting campus for graduates in
all liberal arts areas for editorial posi-
tions with the Journal. Also have Sum-
mer Intern positions. Speak with him
at the Journ. Dept. 2040 LS&A Bldg
on Wednesday Jan. 21.
SInqu~ire abou these programs at
career planning, 764-6338. 3200f SAI3.
De~adline for Memoriatl Scholarships
at Katharine Gibbs. March 1.
Financial Management Interns, De-
partment of Health. Education a n d
Welfare. A two year program: aca-
demic curriculum interpreting needs of
financial management in government,
and second year work in aWsh. D.C
in challenging trainee positions design-
ed to give broad exper in financial
mgmt., involved in social action pro-
grams and efforts of entire public sec-
tor State. local and private.. Study"
may lead to Masters in Public Admin-
istration from Univ. of Pittsburgh
School of Public and International Af-
fairs. Apply before March 31. FSEE qual-
ifications nec,
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB, Lower Level
Interview at Summer Placement:
January 26: Miss Liberty, London,
England, representative, will interview
interested students Mon., Jan. 26 from
3-5 p.m. Openings for men and women
in general office work. Evenings and
weekeds free to travel, etc.
jJanuary 28, 29 and 30: Camp T'amar-
ack, Fresh Air Society, Detroit. Open-
ings for cabin counselors, specialists
in waterfront, arts & crafts, nature
campcraft, tripping, dramatics, dance,
music, unit and asst. unit supervisors
caseworker, truck-bus driver,dnurses.
counselors with emotionally disturbed,
Marionette theater, and kitchen -porter
positions.

The Ed School Students and LSA T.C.'s
The Ed School Is Changing
(Students for Educational Innovation)
is HELPING to make the change
but,
it needs your HELP!
MASS MEETING-Ed School Auditorium
(Rm. 1405)-THURSDAY, JAN. 22-7:30

a9

i
'

ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE UNIONS
BOW L ING TOU RNAMENT
QUALIFY JAN. 22-23, 1970
Winners Will Gn to Reaionals
at Columbus February 20
SIGN UP MICHIGAN UNION
SN BOWLING LANES
NOW
O PE N 1 P.M.-M ID NIG HT

.
I
slI
I
'
i
t
'I
a
s

V .... _._ __._..... .. w

COME TO THE SOC. FACULTY MEETING TODAY
Act in support of departmental democracy. Today
the faculty is at last taking up a student proposal
calling for open meetings,
MEET US AT 11 :30 A.M., S.A.B. (SGC Offices)
SSU MEETING TONITE 9:30
THIRD FLOOR S.A.B.

Heavy Duty Steering
and Suspension Ports
" BAILLt JOlNTS
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Depart
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Weeks
5
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June 9
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