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December 08, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-12-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. DECEMBER 8, 1967

FRIDAY, DECEIIIBER S. 1967

EXAMINING THE PROGRAM:
Phys Ed Aids Mental Gyu

(Continued from Page 1)
leges in the country extend credit
and give marks," says Begelman.r
"Learning a sport increases in-
tellectual development," Haber
says. "But the University does
not give credit for taking a phys-
ical education course because it
would look like an easy way to
get credit - the University should
be a place for the development of
the mind rather than the body."
Hunsicker says that "if we
counted the grade on a brilliant
student who is a lousy athletic,
it would hurt his average, and
we don't want to do that."'
However, Begelman explains
that "our records have shown that
if a student gets a low mark in
physical education, he gets a
similar mark in other subjects."
Wayne State University in De-
troit is one of the schools not
requiring a physical education
proficiency for graduation from
its liberal arts college, which en-
rolls a majority of the school's un-
dergraduates.
Wayne's Liberal Arts Council'
eliminated the requirement 18
months ago. "I was present when
the decision was made, and the
feeling was that there were more
important demands on a stu-
dent's time," explains Dr. R. King
Adamson, associate dean of the
WSU College of Liberal Arts.
"We found it was more of an in-
convenience than a benefit."
Howard C. Leibee, director of
men's physical education at the
University, says that "certainly if
phys. ed. were not required enrol-
lment in the course would drop-
that would happen with any re-
quired course."
However, Dr. Richard Havel,
WSU chairman of physical edu-
cation, says that since the course
as a requirement was dropped,
the number of liberal arts stu-
dents taking it voluntarily has
doubled. "There are now about
1500 students taking it, and that's
on the increase," Havel says.
"Even when the expansion of
our facilities is completed we
won't make it a requirement --

we get enough participation vol-I
untarily," says Adamson.
Joseph M. Stamps, chairman
of physical education at the Uni-
versity of Chicago, says, "We
don't believe every student should
have to take the course - those
that can pass a general test in
motorability and swimming are
not required to take phys. ed."
As many as 30 per cent of Chic-
ago's undergraduates place out
of the requirement, Stamps added.
"In the final analysis, it's the
Regents who require the course,
says Hunsicker.
Several Regents are not wildly
enthusiastic fans of the program.
"Well, it's a highly emotional
issue, and since I don't know all
the technical details, I'd rather
not go into it," says Regent Paul
Goebel.
"Physical education may not;
do ay good, but' it doesn't do any
harm either," explains Regent
Mrs. Gertrude Huebner.
Regent Otis Smith was more
willing to elaborate. "In view of
the great number of kids re-
jected from military service for
physical reasons, I .see no object-
ion to the requirement," he says.
"Fitness is the most important
aspect. Even something like bowl-
ing gets a kid out of his ivory
tower and lets him participate in
some form of physical activity.
It's wholesome to go out and
'work up a sweat.'"'
University facilities for physi-
cal education meet widespread-
criticism. Waterman and Barbour
Gymnasiums were built before the
turn of the century and are "the
oldest facilities for physical edu-
cation in the State" according to
Hunsicker.
"If the University was as con-
cerned as it should be for its

undergraduates, building new fa-
cilities would be higher on the list
of priorities," says Mrs. French.
"About $7 million are needed to
provide proper facilities."
"Our facilities are completely
saturated, and we're going to have
to do something about it, hope-
fully in the near future," says
Hunsicker.
Mrs. French maintains that
"the trimester has hurt us ter-
ribly. Since so-called 'spring
sports' have to be conducted in
winter, we can't use all our out-
side facilities like Palmer Field.
We have no effective spring sports
program."
But Leibee says that "trimester
hasn't hurt us at all. It has had
no marked effects."
The women's physical education
department employs a total of 27
instructors, ranging in rank from
teaching fellow to full professor.
The men's department employs
sixteen instructors, including four
teaching fellows. Mrs. French esti-
mates the average semester turn-
out for the physical education
service program at 3000 and Hun-
sicker says that the men's is ap-
proximately 2500.
Both agree that the quality of
the staff is excellent. "We have
the best staff in the country," says
Mrs. French.
"It's a very selective process-
many more instructors want to
teach at the University than we
can employ," explains Hunsicker.
But while Mrs. French says that
there is no problem with the stu-
dent-teacher ratio, Hunsicker
complains, "The University is very
cost-conscious - we have the
cheapest ratio on campus."
Mrs. French does complain
about the salary allotment for her
instructors. "Judging from what

rnastics
I've seen, we're one of the poorly-
paid departments on campus."
Every semester surveys are
taken, whis give students a chance
to rate the physical education:
program says Leibee.
The survey sample which Lei-
bee's office provides shows a high,
ow and median number but no
specific figures of approval. Stu-
dents were most dissatisfied with
skills taught.
One survey asked if students
would participate in a voluntary3
program. "Over 70 per cent in-
dicated they would still take it,
says Leibee.
Then why isn't the program
made voluntary?
"Well, the survey is no indica-
tion that the students were telling
the truth," Leibee explains.
Cult
"Any man who hates
children and dogs
can't be all bad.

Concluding Sabbath Service This Semester
Friday at 7:15 P.M.
DR. RAYMOND GREW
Associate Professor of History
Historical Patterns of
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Modern Near East

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