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December 05, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-12-05

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-PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ir'FTF.RnAV'_ 1' EMMIM.R. -9- 1497

P l W H MCIA AL

A UJVjOJIAX, Drt-r IVJ"r n a7, 1.Y131

I

poetry and prose -

Texts of Shaw Letter, LSA
Administrative Board Stand

'Anon'
By ANGELA McCOURT
and MICHEL BENAMOU
Associate Professor of French
"Anon" quietly made its second
appearance on campus last week.
Too quiet, for this collection of
university poetry and fiction de-
serves a wider audience than the
few hundred who managed to
break away from the hourly surge
tlrough the Fishbowl long enough
to buy a copy.
This unsensational, elegantly-
designed issue avoids the cabalism
that. bedevils so many literary
magazines. Instead, with gay dis-
regard for hierarchic and depart-
mental barriers the editors have
included faculty and students, as
well as alumni and Ann Arbor
citizens. There is a wry humility
too in the inclusion of work by
young children from the tutorial
project who may never learn the
formal intricacies of the craft they
practice with such delight.
Perhaps more remarkable than
this catholicity of contributors, is
"Anon's" willingness to go to a
range of relatively unexplored cul-
tures for new tones and images.
Paris and New York have tradi-
tionally been the catalysts for con-
temporary American writing, but
in this collection, we hear the
exciting and unfamiliar cadences
-of Africa, South America, Greece
and Russia.
We cast our first vote for Natalie
Uslenghi, whose single poem
"Rhinoceros," has the sure-footed
tread and the witty diction as-
associated with Marianne Moore's
animal fables. It is a delight to
share such gaiety of language:
Piglike, he recalls the orchid,
But also the cabbage.
From his horn, duncecap of
melancholy,
Come words, svelte cones that
insomnia raises.
At the opposite pole from this
crafted symbol, three. poems by
Michael Allen also win our favor.
It is confessional poetry. But its'
fear, its pain, its disgust, are al-
chemized by imagery into a quasi-!
religious feeling. Fear Is being
"caught in a coombe" of lines
that move as swiftly as David in
front of Goliath. Pain of lost love
turns to sadistic body images in'
"Wake": "I cut into her check to
find the bone . .. I want to reach
her bony paradise,/feel her so
intimately close,/so cold/that I
forget the gashes in my head."
These lines cannot do justice to
the whole poem, a brilliant job
of rhyming, slide-pausing, coun-
terpoint. So much calculated are
compresses and controls the sav-
Japanese Art
Exhibit Here
The Museum of Art is exhibit-
ing "Japanese Prints: Traditions
In Costume", from Dec. 2 to
Jan. 21.
The show includes 45 prints
dating from 1660 to the late 19th
century, illustrating the technical
progression from the early black
and white prints to the late
prints which were influenced by
European art.
Also included are the textiles
and costumes which are seen in
the prints. Japanese artists took
care to represent the dress of
their subjects accurately and ele-
gantly, for the Japanese appre-
ciate both the beauty of the gar-
ment Itself and the symbolic sig-
nificance of the motifs in the
textiles. The textiles and costumes
were loaned by Prof. and Mrs.
Joseph Yamagiwa. Yamagiwa is
in the department of Far Eastern
Languages and Literature.
Japanese musical instruments,
loaned by Prof. William Malm of

the music school, are also on ex-
hibit.
The show was organized by the
students of History of Art 607,
Art Museum: Philosophy and
Practice. The class is taught by
Charles Sawyer, director of the
museum.

Appears
age feeling, that the poem itself
deals the pleasure of exquisite
pain, sacrificially. Allen can be
terribly frank (as when his in-
fant son's erection makes him
sick) without howling: he still
rhymes. And there is enough hu-
nor in the title "Cockcrow," and in
in the title "Cockcrow," and in
the last line ("until the baby's in-
nocent again") to guarantee the
proper distance.
A long and excellent poem by
James Torrens, S.J., "Close Quar-
ters," shows something close to
the mastery or the continuous
thought-process in verse. It tells
the candid experience of a Jesuit
working at a short-order counter
in the city's core, yearning for
prairies, flinching "at the rub-
bings of strange flesh," praying,
praising man, enjoying every line.
Now to one of "Anon's" gems:
J. K. Snyder's translations from
Appollinaire's Bestiary which are

None Too Soon

LSA Board Submits
Disciplinary Guides

jewels of sentimental irony, both
in the original French and in the
precise, tart, poetic English.
Like "Le Bourgeois Gentilhom-
me" we all speak prose, and will-
ful obscurity is easier to spot here
than in poetry. The temptation in
writing short fiction is too often'
to lurch uneasily between Kafka
and Beckett. Enigmatic anecdotes
are not enough, nor is terse prose
uttered by demi-Estragons.
Overcoming these temptations,
Justin Vitiello produces the best
piece of prosein the collection, an'
attempt by the first man to collate
his perceptions. A trite subject, no
doubt, but Vitiello's control of lan-
guage allows him to create images
which are both synaesthetic and
uncategorized:
"In full bloom, the lemon
trees call up his clay-cracked
palms. That first day, he rooted
them, sweat stained his face
like a host of snowflakes, melting

down the windowpanes. Through
their paraffin haze, he watched
the winter simmer by and won-
dered how long it would take
before he could squeeze the tart
juice into his parched mouth."
The most disappointing prose
contribution is Tony Stoneburner's
"Sweetness and Darkness," a
Hopkinsesque pastiche of dessi-
cated benevolence and stained
phrases.
Lem Johnson and Howard
Wolfe need no other commen-
dation than that they are 1967
Hopwood winners. Less well-
known,but deserving quick men-
tion are Jan Geasler, for a pleas-
ant vignette, and Megan Biesele
for a witty, incisive portrayal of
the vapid committee mother over-
whelmed suddenly and simultan-
eously by death and life.-
The voices of "Anon" are varies
and rich. They deserve identity
and recognition.

Most Colleges Show Lenience
Toward Campus Demonstrators

(Continued from Page 1)
The students say they will ap-
peal to the school's council of
deans, the regents, and to the
courts, if necessary.
At the University of Illinois,
seven undergraduates have been
suspended and 47 others face sim-
ilar action because they blocked
access to a Dow Chemical Com-
pany recruiter. One student, how-
ever, had his dismissal from the
university suspended. Only one
graduate student has been tried
so far, and was placed on proba-
tion.
One professor has resigned, and
500 people demonstrated last week
in support of the seven who were
suspended. The seven plan to ap-
peal to a committee of all the
university deans.
Harvard University has placed
on probation 74 students and "ad-
monished" another 171. Harvard
Dean Frederick L. Glimp said the
reason for the probation was the
students' "contribution to the
forceable obstruction of an indi-
vidual"when they captured a Dow
recruiter.
At the University of Iowa, Dean
of 'Students M. L. Hewitt placed
80 students on probation, most of
whom had already been fined by
civil courts for a demonstration
against a Dow recruiter. Proba-
tion at Iowa means suspension if
the student commits any further
violation. Most of the demonstra-,
tors will probably appeal the
decision to higher university
authorities.
Although many people have ob-
jected to Iowa's action because the
students had already been pun-

ished by the courts, university
officials justify their action on
the grounds that the students
blocked the door of a university
building.
The University of Wisconsin,
site of the first and largest of
the October demonstrations, has
the most complicated legal situa-
tion. Thirteen students have been
singled out by the university as,
leaders of the October 17 demon-
stration against Dow. A disciplin-
ary committee has been holding
hearings on this group but can
take no action as long as the court
order barring university action is
in force.
The first hearing, held this last
week, was broken up after a group
of students disrupted the pro-
ceedings with shouting and noise.
The next hearing will probably be
closed.
Ten of the 13 also face action
in the courts and one, teaching
assistant Robert Cohen, will face
a hearing before the university
regents on whether or not he
should be fired from his assistant-
ship. The Cohen question has
caused a split between Wisconsin
President Fred Harrington and
Madison Campus Chancellor Wil-
liams Sewell. Harrington wants
Cohen fired while Sewell says the
question should be left up to the
university faculty.
The State Senate, which now is
in recess, is also conducting an
investigation. The Senate has is-
sued a preliminary report even,
though a court order is being
sought to restrain it from further
action. The report recommends
state laws prohibiting sit-ins in
publicly financed buildings.

At the University of Pennsyl-
vania the administration originally
set up what it calls "the Free
Speech Committee" to hear the
cases of 15 students involved in
two protests against Dow and CIA.
But students objected because
they were not consulted on the
establishment of the committee,
on which the faculty holds a 7-4
membership advantage.
Because of these objections, the
university has said that students
may choose between the com-
mittee or regular university dis-
ciplinary procedures, which would
leave the decision in the hands of
student courts for undergraduates
and academic deans for graduate
students. The students are ex-
pected to decide this week which
they will choose.,
At Stanford University, the
student judicial board has re-
fused to take any action against '10
students involved in a demon-
stration against the CIA, and
Dean of Students Joel Smith has
referred the case to an all-faculty
appeal board.
Although the student govern-
ment has withdrawn its recogni-
tion of the board, it is still ex-
pected to hear the case, since it
has the support of the university
administration. The controversy
may, however, be solved by the
appointment of a special student-
faculty committee to hear the
case.
Wednesday Is Ladies Day,
DIAL 8-6416
"A lusty, boldly,
provocative film."
LIFE MAGAZINE
Once again the screen
explodes with rage,
passion and greatness! I11

The following is the text of a
letter from James W. Shaw, assistant
dean, and chairman of the literary
college administrative board to
Richard L. Cutler, vice president for
student affairs, referring to cutler's
request that the board take dis-
ciplinary action against Mrs. Karen
Daenzer.
Dear Mr. Cutler:
I am writing in response to
your letter of October 30, 1967,
regarding the October 11, 1967,
disturbance on the North Cam-
pus. The Administrative Board of
the College has examined the
materials you forwarded to us and
has given very serious considera-
tion to the suggestion that they
initiate disciplinary action against
the LSA student who was alleged
to have contributed to the disrup-
tion. For a number of rather spe-
cial reasons, the Board has de-
cided not to accept initial juris-
diction in this particular case.
Members of the Board were es-
pecially desirous, however, that I
convey to you the reasons for their
action, so that you would not in-
terpret this specific decision as
their general policy or even as an
indication of any particular at-
titude of their's toward the issue
involved.'
They'wished me to stress the
fact that their declining to hear
this particular case was based
primarily on the circumstances
surrounding the case rather than
upon the issues which the case it-
self raised. Specifically, the Board
declined to hear the case in ques-
tion 1) because some six, weeks
had elapsed between the time of
the offense and the time when
they could have initiated action;
2) because they felt that there
was no clear delegation to them
to hear such a case unless, con-
trary to University "common law,"
it were to be termed an "aca-
demic" offense; and 3) because
they felt it unwise to declare such
a disturbance an "academic" of-
fense after the fact.
As you can see from these rea-
sons, the Board has not said that
it is unconcerned with disruptive
behavior, nor has it said that it
is unwilling ever to hear such
cases. On the contrary, every
member is deeply concerned, and
the Board is presently drafting a
statement of policy which will at-
tempt to define disruptive be-
havior, to set forth the College's
attitude toward such behavior,
and to clarify the College's role in
seeing that students involved in
such behavior are properly disci-
plined. I might add, however, that
most members of the Board feel
that. University-wide policies and
procedures for handling these
matters are highly desirable, with
the College's role being limited to

the formulation of policy and the
hearing of appeals where suspen-
sion or expulsionis involved.
I hope that this brief summary
of our thinking will be of some
help to you. Since it seems mu-
tually beneficial that we keep
each other appraised of develop-
ments in these matters, I will be
happy to keep you posted, if you
wish, as our Board proceeds in
their deliberations.
Sincerely,
James W. Shaw
Assistant Dean and
Chairman,
Administrative Board
* * *
The following is a text of a pro-
posed policy statement for the con-
sideration of the dean and execu-
tive committee, presented by the
administrative board of the literary
college.
December 1, 1967
Whereas free and open ex-
change of ideas is central to the
purposeiand very existence of the
University, t he Administrative
Board of this College holds that
interference with such an ex-
change is a serious offense against
the entire academic community
and that offenders are subject to
appropriate discipline.
Therefore, in order to protect;
this process and to insure that the
operations of the University pro-
ceed in a civilized manner, the
Administrative Board holds that
a student of this College who in-
terferes with aiy other member
of the academic community so as
to disrupt that person's partici-
pation in any activity or function
conducted under the auspices of
the University should be subject
to disciplinary action.
While the Administrative Board
will continue to hear and adjudi-
cate cases where students of the
College are alleged to have been
involved in cheating, plagiarism,
and disruption in the offices,
classrooms, laboratories, and li-
braries of the College, it holds
that in the interests of consis-
tency the kinds of disruptive be-
havior mentioned in the second
paragraph should be heard at the
University rather than at the
College level-with the traditional
reservation that a student may
appeal to his College any decision
which affects his academic sta-
tus. Accordingly, the Administra-
tive Board strongly urges that a
judiciary be established at the
University level and that this
Board be consulted in its estab-
lishment. However, until the es-
tablishment of such a judiciary,
or in the event that no University
authority a s s u m e s jurisdiction,
the Administrative Board reserves
the right to hear and adjudicate
such cases.

(Continued from Page 1)
0 "some six weeks had elapsed
between the time of the offense
and the time when they could have
initiated action;
* "they felt that there was no
clear delegation to them to hear
such a case unless . . . it were to
be termed an academic offense;
and
0 "they felt it unwise to declare
such a disturbance an 'academic'
offense after the fact."
Both Haber and Shaw said this
decision did not "thereby decline"
the board's jurisdiction in similar
cases "which may occur in the
future."
Appropriate
"Vice-President Cutler's letter
. was entirely appropriate and
quite in order. The Regent's By-
laws clearly locate in 'the college'
faculty the responsibility for the
disciplining of students in this col-
lege. The North Campus incident
involved, among other students,
a student of this college. The Vice-
President had both a right and' a
duty to call the matter to the at-
tention of the Administrative
Board for appropriate action,"
Haber continued.
According to the Regent's By-
laws, Section 8.15, "the several
governing faculties shall have
power of discipline over cases of
misconduct committed by their
own students. Any faculty desir-
ing to do so may delegate all or
any portion of its powers in this
regard to the dean or other ad-
ministrative head, to a discipline
committee . .."
The literary college delegated its

disciplinary jurisdiction to the
College's Administrative Board
which is a 15-man body. Six mem-
bers are elected by the' faculty.
There are three ex-officio seats
on the board; three visitors from
the counseling offices and three
student members.
Dean Haber explained that the
recommendations must be voted
on by the faculty, but until a
University-level judiciary or Uni-
versity-wide authority is estab-
lished to handle such cases, the
board clearly has jurisdiction ac-
cording to the Regent's Bylaws. He
explained that this is not a new
policy but merely a clarification
of the board's jurisdiction over
cases involving academic miscon-
duct.
Shaw said this was the boards
policy "at the moment." He in-
dicated that if a case similar to
Mrs. Daenzer's came up again
"we would consider hearing it, at
least we reserve the right to con-
sider hearing it," until the estab-
lishment of a University-level Ju-
diciary or other authority.
y Concern'
Shaw described the statement as
one of "concern." It is a statement
of "unwillingness to tolerate a
vacuum" in disciplinary jurisdic-
tion and one which "publicly af-
firms what we assumed everyone
knew"-that an interruption of
University functions constituted
academic misconduct.
Shaw said he would personally
prefer to see "a joint student-fac-
ulty University-level judiciary
"with equal representation for
both groups, although, it's up to
faculty.

4

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IN SUPER PANAVISION' AND METROCOIOR

r,
-.2

.0

Across Campus I

Constantinos A. Doxiadis, world
famous urban planner and direc-
tor of the Detroit Urban Area
Study, will deliver the winter
commencement address at the
University on Dec. 16.
The University will confer about
2,000 degrees, about 900 of them
at the bachelor level and the rest
in graduate and professional pro-
grams. Two hundred thirty doc-
torates will be awarded.
Doxiadis, who will receive an
honorary doctor of laws degree
from President Harlan Hatcher, is
a consultant to the United Na-
tions, the World Bank, the In-
ternational Cooperation Adminis-
tration, the Ford Foundation, the
U.S. Agency for International De-
velopment, the Redevelopment
Land Agency of Washington, and
the governments of more than a
dozen countries.

The University Hospital has
just received a three-year renewal
of its certification by the Joint
Commission on Accreditation of
Hospitals.
According to Dr. A. C. Kerli-
kowske, hospital director, formal
accreditation helps ensure pa-
tients of protection in all major
areas of hospital activity.
The Joint Commission is made
up of representatives of the
American College of Physicians,
the American College of Surgeons,
the American Hospital Associa-
tion, and the American Medical
Association.
* * *
At 8:30 p.m. today the Profes-
sional Theatre Program will pre-
sent Studs Terkel's "Amazing
Grace" at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.

fV'RICHARD"'
BUTON
EECKET

[I

I

I

-THURSDAY-
"Billy Liar" & "Lord of the Flies"

Lic*' kJ1~Mlege s idle Du g 1I, 1I11ULuLu Isch ases. I
. .F.CLIP AND SAVE
IV I
-----u- l ~ ITt oruim
PROUDLY PRESENTS-
A Collection of Classic Films Selected by Discriminating
~~ ~ 'Movie-Goers as their Favorites .. Each of Which
* ,,. xc"Ay ~ ,Has Left Its Mark on the History of the Screen!
210 S. FIFTH AVE. 761-9700
ONE YOU1
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SWINNER OF,
WINE LEST PICTURE OF THE IIEAR M N
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Wednesday & Thursday

4:10 P.M.

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE-
presents
THE BIKINI
by Charles Reinhold
AND
THE JAIL
by Douglas Sprigg
(Original One-Acts in Co-operation with the Department of English)
DECEMBER 6 and 7 Admission FREE
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building
Shows at ENDING
1:10-3:30 THURSDAY
A GORGEOUS
PIECE OF
FILM-MAKING<
-SAIMAY REVIEW
-

a - L N BN ai
just bugs the Establishment as
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sceen byDONN PEARCE aoFRANK R PIERSON ,arece by STUART ROSENBERG
irow by GORDON CARROLL TECHNICOLOR"PANRAISIOH FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS
1 :40-4:05-6:40-9:15
TOMORROW 1S , -:;

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