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November 30, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-30

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

- -- -- ---7---

Greece,
Cyprus

Turkey
Crisis A

Finalize
Ogreement
.................B ri. ....tis h S h ift
-- ,, PostsAfter

A AFTER BLOODY STRUGGLE:
Southern Arabia Celebrating
New Freedom from Britain

Withdrawal
SOf Troops
Vance Meets With
Makarios; To Seek
Settlement Approval
ATHENS, Greece (A) - Diplo-
matic sources said yesterday
Greece and Turkey have reached
agreement on settling the Cyprus
crisis and credited U.S. and an At-
lantic Alliance mediator with
achieving the settlement.
Cyrus R. Vance, President John-
son's special envoy, met in Cyprus
with President Makarios, Greek
Cypriot leader, apparently to sell
him on the settlement.
Manlio Brosio, secretary-general
of the North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization, shuttled between An-
kara and Athens working out de-
tails of the agreement.
Agreement Terms
The agreement is generally be-
lieved to call for Turkey to im-
mediately drop its warlike posture
and for Greece to withdraw some
8,000 to 12,000 Greek soldiers from
Cyprus. This is clandestine force
far above the 950 allowed by the
Zurich Treaty of 1959 setting up
the eastern Mediterranean island
of Cyprus as an independent re-
public.
It was not immediately made
clear if both the legitimate Greek
force of 950 and the 650 Turkish'
soldiers would be removed and the
policing of the split island left en-'
tirely to the 4,500-man United
Nations force on the scene.
Makarios opposed the withdraw-
al of Greek troops unless all the
Turkish troops were recalled. But
Turkey insisted its garrison on
Cyprus is needed to protect the
Turkish Cypriot minority.
Head Off War3
Whether Vance won over Maka-
rios was not known, but it appear-
ed Greece and Turkey were bent
on going ahead with the agreement
to head off war between these two
NATO allies.
On his return to Athens, Brosib!
said he was optimistic over a solu-
tion but "there is more work to be'
done.
Then he went into another hud-
dle with Greek officials and at
nightfall. Diplomatic informants
said the fringe details were ironed
out.
As evidence of the easing of ten-'
sion, the Greek government called
off the combat alert of its armed
forces. They were placed instead
on a state of readiness.
Other reported concessions by
Greece would be the removal of
Gen. George Grivas, commander
of the Greek national guard in
Cyprus, and indemnification for
two Turkish villages attacked by
the Greeks two weeks ago.
This was the incident that ig-
nited the long-smoldering Turkish
anger, expressed once before in the
crisis of late 1963 and 1964.
At that time, attacks on Turkish
Cypriot villages by Greek Cypriots
touched off the first crisis.
As they did in this crisis, Turkey
threatened 'invasion, marshaled
naval forces and sent jet planes
zooming over Cyprus.
Turkish jets swept low over Ni-
cosia, Cypriot capital, Wednesday
while Vance was there.

ADEN (P-At the stroke of mid-
night, southern Arabia became
yesterday the independent South
Yemen Peoples Republic, ending
a bloody rebellion and 128 years
of British rule in Aden.
The republic will be ruled by the
National Liberation Front (NLF)
headed by Qahtan Al Shaabi, who#
hammered out a final agreement
with the British in Geneva Tues-
day and then flew back for the
independence celebrations.
U.S. Aid Pro
TermiatedA

Pound Slip
LONDON RP--James Callaghan
paid the political price for devalu-
ation yesterday and resigned as
Rria'c harnln o- n

I
I
! !f
I1

LriLLaill s tcnaIn.Ae1UI Uof tet ex

SPECIAL ENVOY CYRUS VANCE (left) walks with Dr. Fazil Kutc
dent in Nicosia, Cyprus, yesterday during negotiations to end the G
Vance's efforts led to a settlement of the dispute on the island, whi
between the two countries over thetir citizens' rights.
Administration ToCj
Renews Plea for Tax

chequer. He swapped jobs with TEHRAN, Iran ) - After
Home Secretary Roy Jenkins, who spending close to $1 billion, Wash-
now stakes his political future on ington is officially closing the
making devaluation of the pound U.S. aid mission in Iran today.
sterling work. Fifteen years ago this nation
The switch gives responsibility tottered on the edge of economic
for the nation's finances to one of and political disaster, but Iran is
the Labor government's most de- now so strong that Washington
voted and articulate champions of has decided to remove it from the
Britain's entry into the European list of needy nations.
Common Market. Even without The last .of the mission's direc-
President Charles de Gaulle's in- tors, Edward F. Tennant, says:
transigent opposition, Britain will "Without the Iranian govern-
have to restore its economy to ment's cooperation, this great
health and institute basic reforms achievement would not have been
-Associated Press during the long and uncertain haul possible."_
huk, Turkish Cypriot vice-presi- toward Europe. The mission began in 1950. It
reek-Turkish struggle on Cyprus. The change also helps calm po- was impeded for a time by the
ch threatened to set off a war litical tensions that had been policies of an anti-American pre-
threatening to tear the government mier, Mohammed Mossadegh, but
apart. A sizeable minority of Labor picked up steam after Mossadegh's
members of Parliament felt that departure.
Wilson should also pay the price Of all the joint projects under-
" for failure to preserve the pound, taken with the Iranian govern-
a policy that was as much'Wilson's ment, Tennant says, the outstand-
as Callaghan's. f ying one has been the strengthen-
But Callaghan freely took the ing of the public administration
blame in the British political tra- structure.
dition. In this program, a mission staff
"I was the responsible minister. I of 2,000, including Iranians train-
Wilbur D. Mills, (D-Ark), said personally gave pledge to people ed in the United States and Eu-
there just isn't enough time left to sitting in my room at the treasury rope, built the administrative
get a bill through the House. that we would not devalue. If a foundation to permit Iran's rapid
One Democratic supporter of in- minister says these things, he growth.
creased taxes who declined to be must take the consequences." Apart from that, the program
quoted by name said after Fow- --
ler's testimony that the admin- ~------- -
istration is setting up the tax-I
spending package for approval
next year.
But Rep. James A. Burke (D- HOW E NOW
Mass), a committee member, said
"I don't see how the committee
can wait until next year to decide "The remarkable thing about Howe [is] that he
the issue. We have to give it very
serious consideration now. managed, in a steady voice, without wildness, and
Rep. James W. Byrnes of Wis-
consin, senior Republican member as a friendly antagonist to established liberalism,
of the committee, said: "We'll have to remind everybody that many things were
to wait and see." There was no
immediate reaction from Mills. still wrong in our society. ...
Rep. Hale Boggs, (D-La), a com-
mittee member, said he favorsthei George Kateb,
surcharge now even more than he
did on Oct. 3 when the committee I Book Week
shelved the surcharge over his ob-
jections and insisted on a plan to
cut spending. --------------------- -

The Britishsaid Al Shaabi. won't Yemen (FLOSY) which lost a
get any land concessions, on the bloody struggle to the NLF. But
peninsula or on the islands at the both had attacked the British in
entrance to the Red Sea. This is Aden.
bothering Israel since Al Shaabi Scarcely 12 hours before inde-
has promised to block Israeli ship- pendence, the last 900 of a British
ping if he can. force that once numbered 12,000
Al Shaabi said his government's pulled out of Aden.
first acts would be to apply for The final 120 men of a fear
membership in the Arab League guard of royal marine commandos
and the United Nations, was lifted in helicopters from an
Left out in the cold was the rival abandoned British golf course to
Front for the Liberation of South the 23,000-ton aircraft carrier Al-
-__ _ _- - - bion anchored in Aden's harbor.
The nation of 112,000 square
to ran miles, mostly of scorching desert,
vram to Iran < = =
has a population of 900,000, mostly
Arabs.
- 1 ' ea s Arabs erected triumphal arches
throughout Aden and decorated
buildings with red, white and black
encompassed a wide range of light bulbs, the colors of the new
activity, ranging from improve- republic.
ment of livestock strains to con- In the streets where Arab once
struction of Iran's largest dam fought Arab and Arabs fought
in Khuzistan. British, thousands turned out for
"We have been a stimulating the celebrations.
force rather than a directive one, " While the NLF actually took over
Tennant says. American partici- Aden Sunday when British troops
pation was heavy in the early withdrew to barracks, the final
stages of the mission but there- agreement on independence was
after Iranians shouldered larger not reached until Wednesday in
responsibilities. Geneva.
What is called "invisible" aid A joint communique said the
spurred significant advances in major issue of British financial
education .It brought unique tri- aid will be worked out later. Brit-
bal schools to a primitive area of ain will continue its aid at the cur-
Baluchistan in the southeast rent rate of $144 million a year for
where Americans in 1956 were the next six months.
savagely attacked and three aid Al Shaabi said in Geneva he
officials slain. The tribal schools wants the aid to continue at that
now move about with the tribes rate to compensate for "128 years
and their flocks. of colonial exploitation."

GUILD
802 M

HOUSE
onroe

WASHINGTON (P)-The John-
son administration presented to
Congress yesterday a tax and
spending plan it said could lower
this year's budget deficit to $13.7
billion and insure confidence in
the dollar, if enacted quickly.
Secretary of the Treasury Henry
H. Fowler said approval this year
of the plan-or one like it-is an
"inescapable responsibility of the
Congress in the wake of British
devaluation and last week's run on
gold.
"Delay can be as damaging as
defeat," he said in testimony be-
fore the House Ways and Means
Committee.
Fowler renewed the adminis-
tration's plea for the 10 per cent
surcharge on income taxes and
stuck to the originalteffective
dates-Oct. 1 for individuals and
July 1 for corporations, both 1967.
The surcharge would be calcu-
lated to raise an extra $7.4 billion
in extra revenue this year.
As part of the same package,
however, he proposed in legislative
form budget cuts of $4.1 billion
during the current fiscal year
which ends next June 30. This

would be accomplished by a for-
mula "reducing the authority of
government agencies to commit
funds.
Fowler said it would not be feasi-
ble to collect through withholding
from paychecks any of the addi-
tional individual taxes which would
be due through December under
the plan.
Collection would be made, he
said, when taxpayers file their
1967 income tax returns early
next year. He said that for two-
thirds of the taxpayers the sur-
charge would be reflected in-small-
er refunds rather than any addi-
tional payments.
Strong support for the admin-
istration plan also came in testi-
mony from Budget Bureau director
Charles L. Schultze and Chairman
William McChesney Martin Jr. of
the Federal Reserve Board.
Martin called the spending cuts
meaningful but said he would be
happier if more cuts were made.
Even before the hearing opened,
the odds for adoption of a~ tax
bill this year dropped virtually to
zero when committee Chairman

I

Friday, Dec. 1
NOON LUNCHEON 25
MR. BERNARD KLEIN, Comptroller, City of Detroit
"The Establishment; Governing
Urban America
Uncle Russ presents in Detroit,
direct from New York City, the
out of sight
Chamibers Brothers
The Thyme The Children
The Endless Chain The Up
Friday Dec. 1st, Sat., Dec. 2nd
Coming December 8th & 9th
THE MOBY GRAPE
THE GRANDE BALLROOM, Grand River at Beverly,
1 block south of Joy, Detroit

I

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Ticket Office Open Weekdays 10:00 - 1:00 and 2:00 - 5:00

Those who miss it shed many a tear,
so don't miss out on
THE HUNGRY EAR
The League this Friday
9-12 P.M.
Ties and Jackets-$.50 a head
MOOD MUSIC provided by
THE WEST WIND DRIFT
ALL YOU CAN EAT!

8:30-1:00 A.M.

ADMISSION $2.50

Advance tickets: J.L. Hudson, Grande Box
Office, Grionells, & The Trans-Love Store
A Russ Gibb Production--834-9348

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OPEN TICKET

Wed. & Thurs.
$1.75 & $1.25

SALES

Fri. - Sun.
$2.00 & $1.50

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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
for the
f DPT OF SPEECH PRODUCTION

i

CINEMA II

Presents

CATHLEEN VICTOR
NESBITT BUONO

"12 ANGRY

MEN

E. G. Marshall-Lee J. Cobb-Henry Fonda

IN
STUDS TERKEL'S
Scenery and Lighting by
ELDON ELDER
Directed by
MARCELLA CISNEY

V ri. yr or rn r vf vEĀ®
of
NOLCERE'. Comedy
A VERY FRENCH FARCE
WED.-SAT., NOV. 29 - DEC. 2, 8 P.M.
ALSO
SUNDAY MATINEE, DEC.3
2:30 p.m.

Screenplay: Reginald Rose
("The Defenders")

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