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November 30, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-30

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I

THlE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1967

m

poetry and prose

olkein Music: Complex, CadencedI

Rioting Continues in Malaysia; ORGANIZATION
Civil Defense Groups Mobilize

A

By STEVE WILDSTROM
THE ROAD GOES EVER ON: A
SONG CYCLE, poems by J. R. R.
Tolkein, music by Donald Swann.
68 pages. Houghton Mifflin, $3.95.
SMITH OF WOOTON MAJOR, by
J. R. R. Tolkein, illustrated by
auline Baynes. 62 pages. Houghton
M iV flin, 1;1.95.
About two years ago, a small
clique of J.R.R. Tolkein fans sud-
denly expanded into a national
following. Publishers being pub-
lishers, the response to the vast
new interest in "The Hobbit" and
"The Lord of the Rings" was in-
evitable - new books by Prof.
Tolkein.
The first of these was "The Tol-
kein Reader," a collection of brief
works published in paperback by
Ballantine last year.
This month, the Houghton Mif-
flin Co. released two new books
Faye Hits D
For ReplaCi
By GREG ZIEREN,
Prof. Gerald Faye of Oakland
Community College strongly cri-
tized leaders of the Michigan
Democratic Party for their part in
"throwing out" Chairman Zolton
Ferency who recently announced
#ss resignation from that post.
Faye was one of the leaders of
the Johnson-Humphrey cam-
paign in Michigan in 1964 and
was himself a candidate in the pri-
mary for the Second Congres-
sional District seat that year.
Faye, speaking to a group of
University Young Democrats at
the UGLI last night, said that
with Ferency gone control of the
Michigan Democratic Party would
revert to the "traditional leaders
of ;the Wlliams-Staebler mold"
This refered to former Michigan
governor G. Mennen Williams and
former party chairman Neil Staeb-
:er.
"These party leaders would
say, 'Let's have unity,' which
:anti-Vietnam
Ballot Loses
In Cambridge
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (P) - A
resolution urging "the prompt re-
turn of America nsoldiers from
Vietnam" has been defeated by
Cambridge voters, 17,742 to 11,349.
Both critics and backers of the
Johnson administration's policy
on Vietnam said they were en-
couraged by the vote.
in Washington, Democratic Na-
tional Committee Chairman John
M. Bailey described the vote as
"an encouraging endorsement of
President Johnson's policies."
Harvard University economist
and former U.S. Ambassador to
India John Kenneth Galbraith
said, "the administration will
make a grave mistake if they
assume that this is anything but
a vote of no confidence."
MSU Protests
Marines, War
EAST LANSING (/P)-Amid signs
proclaiming "The Marine Corps
Kills Men" and "War Is Hell,"
some 800 Michigan State Univer-
'ity,4tudents gathered Wednesday
at a rally protesting the war in
Vietnam and the appearance on
campus of U.S. Navy and Marine
.ecruiters.
Many of the students, however,
came to watch or put forward

points of view opposed to those
of Students fob a Democratic So-
ciety (SDS), which called the
rally.
"This university has the right
and obligation to insist (the re-
cruiters) do not come back to our
campus," Dr. Bertram Garskoff,
assistant professor of psychology,
told the group.

for Tolkein fans. The first and
more important of these is "The1
Road Goes Ever On, A Song
Cycle," a set of Tolkein poems set;
to music by Donald Swann. Swann
is best known to the world as thei
piano-playing half of Flanders
and Swann, creators of "At thec
Drop of a Hat" and other musical
delights.
At first glance, "The Road Goes
Ever On," appears to be a rather1
flippant .effort. It is a very at-I
tractive book, over-sized andc
printed on heavy, cream-coloredI
paper and decorated by Tolkeinj
in elf-rune caligraphy. Clearly a
book to grace coffee-tables dur-
ing and after the Christmas book-
giving season. '
And the coffee-table is wherec
it is likely to stay. Bookiacket
blurbs notwithstanding, people
who wish to give a book for fam-1
em Leaders
ig Ferency
means let's not talk about the
issues," he asserted.c
Turning to national issues Faye
called former Defense Secretary
Robert McNamara "one of the
three most informed persons inr
the country about the war in Viet-
nam." McNamara, who just re-r
cently announced his resignation
and subsequent nomination to
the head of the World Bank "mustr
have been fed-up after seven years1
of one of the hardest Jobs in the
country," Faye said.1
He speculated, however, that1
Johnson nominated him for that
post "at the cost of being silentt
for six months or so." Faye saidl
that McNamara, despite his per-c
sonal views on the war, had beenc
''caught between. Secretary ofc
State Dean Rusk and the Joint<
Chiefs of Staff."
Du Pont for Congress c
He revealed that several leaders1
of the Democratic Party in Ann
Arbor were "seriously considering"
Jerry Dupont as a Congressional
candidate. Dupont, a recent grad-
uate of the University Law School,
was narrowly defeated last spring
in his bid for Ann Arbor council
member from the Second Ward.
Faye said that candidates op-
posed to the war in Vietnam were
needed "at all levels." Such can-
didates, he explained, will deter-
mine what is to be discussed at the
county Democratic organizations
and then at, the state level.
"Eugene McCarthy (D-Minn) is
not an idle man playing a fool's
game," Faye said referring to a
possible McCarthy challenge to
the renomination of President
Johnson. Faye added that he was
"certain" that McCarthy would
announce his candidacy this week-
end at the national convention
of the Conference for Concerned
Democrats in Chicago.
Lost in Primary
"Truman did not say that he
would not be a candidate in 1952
until he lost the New Hampshire
primary to Estes Kefauver." Faye
said. He added, "Johnson would
rather go down in history as the
man who got the greatest number
of votes, not the man with
the greatest number of votes who
lost re-election."
Faye cited the possible Mc-
Carthy, campaign as a "threat to
the presidential ambitions of
Robert Kennedy (D-NY)." He
said that regardless of what hap-
pens in 1968 McCarthy will come
out a national figure and a pos-
sible presidential nominee in 1972.
Earlier the executive board of
the University Young Dems passed
a resolution which urged Mc-
Carthy to declare himself a can-
didate and run against Johnson in
the primaries.

tv
i
UL' SS

ily sing-alongs at the piano would
be better advised to give "The+
Rodgers and Hammerstein Song
Book," for Swann has made a
serious effort and 'has created a
complex cycle which must be con-
sidered a contribution to the art1
of the song.
Tolkein's books are filled with
song and, as Swann says in hisj
introduction, the word-music of
the poems themselves and thei
music of Middle Earth already!
existed. Yet Swann does a com-I
mendable job in matching hisj
music to the mood and cadence of
the poems.
Six of the songs are taken fromj
"The Lord of the Rings." Thej
seventh, which complements andj
completes the cycle, is from "Thei
Adventures of Tom Bombadil."
The scoring is for baritone with1
piano accompaniment. Four of thet
songs are also marked with guitar
chordings (for what Swann calls
"the folk version") and one,
"Namarie" (Galadriel's farewell)s
has a figured guitar accompani-]
ment. The harmonies of the re-
maining three, Swann says, are
too complex for the guitar.
Swann gives considerable free-
dom to the performer. Tempos
are marked simply "freely" or
"steadily" in place of the more;
familiar and precise Italian desig-
nations. "Namarie," in fact, is so
free that Swann has left it almost]
completely unmeasured, making]
the phrasing anyone's guess.
While too complex for a com-
munity songfest, "The Road Goes
Ever On" should have a future in
the serious art-song repertoire.
Most of the melodies are simple,
linked by a common theme first
stated in D major and modulated
through several major and minor:
keys. The harmonies of the ac-
companiment, however, are intri-
cate and interwoven-rather what
one woulddexpect of Elf-influenced
songs of Middle Earth.-
The eleven-song "A Elbereth
Gilthoniel," which recurs several
times in "The Lord in the Rings,"

is stated by Swann as a stark
Gregorian chant. Swann's setting
of the songs, incidentally, was
composed with the cooperation
and approval of Tolkein himself.
The cycle has one additional
advantage for those wishing to
perform it. Swann, has released
all rights-the only requirement
is that performances be register-
ed with ASCAP. There are no
royalties. "The Road Goes Ever
On" hAs already been recorded by
Caedmon, with William Elvin,
baritone, and Swann at the piano.
"Smith of Wooton Major" is
the lesser of the new books. It is
a brief and charming story bound
in hardcover. Despite the pub-
lisher's claim that it "is worthy
to be read by people of all ages,"
Houghton Mifflin seems to feel
the book is destined for the chil-
drens' market. They are wrong.
Readers who are familiar with
Tolkein's essay "On Fairy Stories"
in "Tree and Leaf" will immedi-
ately recognize "Smith of Wooton
Major" as Tolkein's prototype for
such stories-much more so than
"Leaf by Niggle," which was or-
iginally intended to illustrate the
enemy.
Briefly, "Smith" is a story about
a young boy who receives a silver
star from Faerie at a party. He
swallows the star unnoticed and
years later it is disgorged and he
learns he can travel in the Magic
Land. This he does until his time
comes and the magic star passes
to another - (Beautiful stories
should never be summarized; the
magic dies with synopsis).
About all that can be said of
such a story is "Read it." While
Tolkein says nothing profound in
"Smith," he takes his reader on
a magic voyage.
"Smith" is illustrated with me-
dieval-looking drawings by long-
time Tolkein illustrator Pauline
Baynes. The drawings are attrac-
tive and younger readers will no
doubt enjoy them. Probably adult
readers would rather form pic-
tures in their mind's eye.

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (")
-The Malaysian government mo-
bilized civil defense groups yester-
day as reports came in of more
communal violence between Ma-
lays and Chinese in northwest Ma-
laysia.
Deputy Prime Minister Tun Ab-
dul Razak said the civilians wouldI
be deployed along coastal areasI
where order has been restored to
free police and army troops toI
quell new rioting in the interior.

capital is 200 miles south of Fe- "The most important thing is tc
nang, the island city where riots localize the trouble" Razak said
developed last Friday during a after the weekly cabinet meeting
general strike to protest currency Prime Minister Tunku Abdul
devaluation. Rahman broadcast an appeal for
The nationwide toll from the calm and blamed the riots on
riots rose to 22 dead and 200 in- Communist terrorists and sym-
jured, half of them seriously. pathizers of Mao Tse-tung.
A police spokesman said 882 per- But reports of arson and loting
sons have been arrested, most of trickled in from remove rural areas
them Chinese secret society mem- where reliable sources said Malays
bers. were attacking Chinese with
The civilian defense groups are sharpened steel pipes, long knives

It was the sixth straigth day of composed of volunteers who have
racial clashes between Malays and received extensive training in as-
Chinese in the northwest part of sisting the police and military.
the country. They were previously used dur-
One Malay was killed in a clash ing the 1948-60 Communist insur-
of about 30 Malays and Chinese 20 rection and the 1963-66 guerrilla
miles west of Kuala Lumpur. The a war with Indonesia.
Parking Problems Escalate:
Relief on N orth Campus?.

and bicyie chains.
The Malays resent the econ-
omic domination which the hard
working Chinese have attained.
Most of the Malays in the two
states, Malaysia's rice bowl, are
villagers and most Chinese there
are businessmen.
Rahman toured many of the riot;
areas today, including his home
state of Kedah, where limited mar-
tial law was declared Tuesday. Po-
lice extended curfews in wide areas
of both states.

Boulire on u Che Guevara and The
Latin American Revolution, Thurs, Nov.
30, 3A Union.
La Sociedadi Hispanica, Nov. 30, 7:30
p.m., 3050 Frieze, Homenaje a Ruben
Oario. Speaker: Professor Loveluck.
* * *
Southern Asia Club: There will be
a bag lunch on Fri. at noon in the
Commons Room of Lane Hall. Professor
Peter Gosling and Professor William
Gedney will speak on "The United
States and Thailand".
* ,. *
Engineering Council, meeting, Nov.
30, 7:00 p.m. 3511 SAB,
Christian science College Organiza-
tion holds its weekly testimony meet-
ing, Thursday, 7:30-8:30 p.m., 3545 SAB.
Libertarian League-Ayn Rand Society
meeting, Thurs. Nov. 30, 8 p.m., 3B
Union. The program will include a
discussion of the draft and are-
cording of one of Miss Rand's lectures.
College Republicans, campaign com-
mittee meeting, Thurs., Nov. 30, 4:00
p.m., G.O.P. Office, 2535 SAB.
,e * M
Mock Convention. TG for the Ohio
delegation, Fri., Dec. 1, 4:00 p.m., Bob
Gorsline's apt.,.608 Monroe, No. 21.

A

~6

I

I

(Continued frnom Page 1)
criticized and this plan might be
abandoned.
"It usually takes longer to drive
to the fifth floor of the Thayer
Street Structure behind some nut
than it does to park in commuter
lots and take a bus in," one grad-
uate claims.
Parking in a campus structure
costs either $12 or $14 per month,
depending on how near ground
level you want to park, and cost
may influence a decision to build
more lots. Major parking facilities
are usually financed by bonds
which must be backed by a guar-
antee that they will bring in an in-
come 12 times the total interest
cost, Brown says. This would force

a yearly rental fee to pay off the
construction costs.
A similar condition at UCLA last
year forced the price of annual
student permits to $60 without
noticibly cutting down the parking
problem.
But students will most likely be
forced off campus altogether be-
cause a long range campus plan
calls for the creation of malls in
many streets which provide many
meter spaces.
"Faculty members will always
need to park on campus, though,
because if they can't find a place
to park, they keep all their stu-
dents waiting," an official claims.
"But the individual student can
afford to be a few minutes late."

INDIA
Guild House Internalional Dinners
featuring INDIAN FOOD and
INDIAN MUSIC
Mrs. Adarwei, Mrs. Becker,
Mrs. lyengar, and Gavri Shanker
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1
Punch Hour: 5:30-6:30
COST DINNER: 6:30
(including: Khima, Vegetable Curry, Rice Tulav, etc.)
MAKE RESERVATIONS EARLY (First 45)
Call 662-5189
MUSIC PROGRAM: 7:45
EVERYBODY WELCOME!

I

I,

7ohig t at THE ARK

8:30 P.M.

1421 Hill Street

Thursday-THE LARF'S
A 4-piece Rock Combo-doing original
and Beatle's style rock, and blues.

4~A11 iI

Dial 8-6416
NOW!

I

Friday and Saturday -

THE WAY OUT
A spectacle of Sight and Sound-created
by a group of Ann Arbor composers
$1.00 Cover includes entertainment
and refreshments

Once again the
screen explodes with rage
and passion and greatness!.

moczalsomr-Adow"Mosw

A

--

3rd
Week

G. MICHIGAN

Dial
5-6290

"UPROARIOUS! BAWDY AND HILARIOUS!"

NATIONAL OENERAL COF~PORATION ,~

I

FOX EASTERN THEATRESikV
FOH VILLBE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"769.1300
The glaour
acrd
giatness...
Thespeed
spectacle!

Feature Times: Wed. 8:00 Only
rhurs.: 2:00, 5:15, 8:45

True Magazine
Gorgeous
Piece Of
Fm-
Makingr
- SAJU"DAY
REVEW
COOUNI PICTURES PRESENTS
WICZIRD
TITR,, lIU
S"BEST ACTRESS"
(forVirgnia Woolf')

m.

- 3rd WEEK 1

tvftmlfl2

IN SUPER PANAVISION' AND METROCOL.OR0

Shows at
1:10, 3:30,
6:15, 8:57

Tuf 7njmph

Feature at
1:30,4:00,
6:50, 9:20

-.. ..

... _

Cinema Guild
Defense Fund
Benefit
RATIONALS
MC-5
THE CHILDREN
BILLY C & THE
SUNSHINE
THE TYME
Sunday. Dec. 3

THURSDAY and FRIDAY
GREE
GREED, made in 1924 by Erich Von Stroheim, has
been called "one of the great triumphs of Ameri-
can realism." Through personification of evil by
minute character representation, Von Stroheim re-
mained faithful to every intention of Frank Norris,
upon whose book, "McTeague," the film is based.
The horror of money and its power to corrupt are
seen as the "essence of sordidness,"

("What
we've got
here is
a failure to
communicate.")

1:30
4:00
6:40
9:20

*1

ULN wmam
ac i'nn uo iun imu

starring-

"mighty strong meat

*i

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