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November 22, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-22

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN IVATIX

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IELIN SDAY, 1NtJVXEMBE , ?, 196

I

poetry and prose

Local Inter-Faith Council Wars

Morgenstern's 'Gallows': Biting 'With Vietnam War and Draft

New Bus Ad RequiremenFo
Stress Ordered Progress

"Gallows Songs," by Christian
Morgenstern. Trans. by W. D.
Snodgrass and Lore Segel. Uni-
versity of Michigan Press, $7.95.
By SHARON FITZHENRY #
The works of the German poet
Christian Morgenstern remain, to
date, relatively unknown to Amer-
ican audiences; a great pity, for
his poems, though' of another
language, can be as clever and as
biting as those of e. e. cummings
or of Ogden Nash.
Morgenstern was born in 1871
and when he was a young man,
he and some of his fellows form-
ed what one might call a fra-
ternity, though of a macabre sort.
They called themselves The Club
of the Gallows Gang, and devoted
their activities, logically enough,
to studies of the gallows, meeting
i rooms filled with grotesque
caricatures of objects associated
with the act of hanging. From
this rather 'esoteric form of fun
came a series of verses, written
by Morgenstern titled "Galgen-
lieder" or "Gallows Songs."
Morgenstern rose to fame in theI
German literary world with the
publication of these poems in
1905. This year an English edi-
tion of the work, translated by
W. D. Snodgrass and Lore Segel
has been released to the American
public.'
Morgenstern's appeal lies large-
ly in his ability to manipulate the
sounds of language, in his juxta-
position of images ("a virus
crouchedupon the terrace/Watch-
ing for someone he might ha-
. rass"), in his skill as a punster
and as a creator of rhymes which
seem to approach the ridiculous

but somehow never quite go over
the edge. His poems seem to
laugh at the world, and dare it to
laugh back.
Yet to consider Morgenstern's
poetry solely on the basis of its
linguistic cleverness, is to lose
much of the meaning behind the
words. The "Gallows Songs" are
a series of gentle satires on the
many thoughts and substances
that characterize mankind.
* The poet writes with a mystical
sense of a bell calling to his lover
to come home, or of a lonely rock-
ing chair moving in the wind. lie
parallels situations of man with
the dilemmas of the inanimate
objects he personifies, allowing
the reader an air of detachment
as he views his own condition.
The Snodgrass-Segel edition of

"Gallows Songs" is a good one.
Both of the translators are well
known in the literary world
(Snodgrass is a professor at
Wayne State University and a
Pulitzer Prize winning poet; Lore
Segel is the author of '"Other
Peoples Houses" published in
1964) and their English interpre-
tations of Morgenstern's verses
are in a very real harmony with
the original German.
The poems reproduced in "Gal-
lows Songs" are not exact word-
for-word translations. They can-

By BILL DE JONG
"People have changed; they no
longer believe violence solves any-
thing," says Mrs. Russell M. Ful-
ler, co-chairman of the Inter-
Faith Council.
3 The Inter-Faith Council is a
group of 1500 local clergy and lay-
men who are actively opposed to
the Vietnamese war and the draft.
Over 80 per cent of the members
are church-affiliated.
The council, initiated only 18
months ago, is connected with the

council sent 28 members to Wash-
ington to confront local congress-
men. It has also participated in
local marches.
Rabbi Harold S. White, another
co-chairman of the group, points
out that the council has given
"money and support" to 1 ocal
peace movements.
The council demands a de-es-
calation of the war and a cessation
of the bombing. "We support a
negotiated peace" says Rabbi
White.
iare HNna

(Continued from Page 1)
church should only preach the Economy and Public Policy," will
Bible.". deal with "how to fit business into
Palmer believes participation in society in an appropriate manner."
the peace movement should be lim- Rewoldt explains "Economic, so-
ited to individual action. cial, political, legal and ethical
Rev. Erwin A. Gaede of the considerations will be discussed."
Unitarian Church, a council mem- Tsertion willse "Busse."
her dos ot gre. Thechuch The third course. "Business
be doesactie tagnee. raise quiosPolicy," described by Rewoldt as
abustbathvesatus ," hayse"Al- a "capstone course," will be taken.
about the status quo, he says. Al- in the final term to "integrate
though all members of my church all the courses taken so far." Re-
Smay not agree with me, they ac- woldt says. Students will be
knowledge my right to speak fromgieralbsnspolmso
the pulpit." Gaede says several given real business problems to
members of his congregation have attack and will "play compultr-
walked out during his sermons. ized games to find the results of
Rev. Tom Bloxam of the Pack- the decisions they have made,"
he adds.
ard Road Baptist Church says, "We will be bringing in teams
"I am not a pacifist and I don't from the business world to pre-
believe the church should be op- sro the cld fo an-
posed to the war," sent problems to the class for an-
Anti-War Statements alysis. The students will work out
The Inter-Faith Council is now these problems, trying to come
circulating statements against out with some kind of practical
the war and draft. "We're trying utions " R.ldt s gram. de-
to reach the smaller congrega-
tions but they just don't seem to veloped by a four-man committee;
react," says Mrs. Fuller. She does
not expect many people to sign Every WED
the statement because of fears ofI ,

including Rewoldt and Adamb,
based its recommendations on,
talks with businessmen, visits to
other leading business schools, 4
and evaluations of the current
program by students and recent
graduates.
According to Rewoldt, many as-
pects of the new program were
suggested by programs at other
schools. "I anticipate that we will
see other schools borrowing from
our program, as we have borrowed
from them," he adds.
"Our hope is that the new pro-
gram will better reflect what busi-
ness is all about these days. What
we are stressing is over-all business
operation rather than just one
narrow field within it.
"Our approach is more analytical
and less descriptive than previous-
ly. There is greater use of new
analytical tools, including prob-
ability theory, decision theory, op-
erations research and the com-
puter."
>NESDAY is
'" IV L%

not be. Instead Snodgrass and national Laymen and Clery Con-
Segel have presented the atmos- cerned About the War in Vietnam. Mrs. Fuller says the group sees
phere, the feel of the poems and "We have all shades of partici- more hope in an international
built up the puns and images us- pation in the council," says Mrs. peace force. There are many ave-
ing English-American references Fuller. "We avoid involvement in wues toward peace if the military
which maintain the original Ger- anything violent, but definitely will cut back, Mrs. Fuller says.
man meter of the lines. lend moral support." Last year the Council members see many prob-
~- _ - - -~-- ~~ - -- - , - -- - lems with the draft and feel the
tccia s"rr i7 lnri nA rr

Dean Joiner Leaving U Law School,
Slated To Become Law Head at WSU
By JAMES JENSEN fter six months of this, he will take thing about the applicatio
Associate Dean Charles W. Join- up the WSU job on a full-time in these situations. "Law c
er is leaving to become dean of the basis. significant tool in this a:
Law School at Wayne State Uni- Joiner describes his past years at remarked, saying that he:
versity after nearly 20 years with Michigan as "exciting and enjoy- so far it has been a too
the University. able." "There's nowhere I'd rather used.
Joiner's appointment was an- have been than here during the Michigan has a great Law
nounced Nov. 9 by WSU President past 20 years," he said. The reason it's just that the school at
William R. Keast. Joiner will re- for his move is a change of en- is "different," Joiner sai
place Arthur Neef, Dean of the vironment, to get closer to the problems of people livingc
WSU Law School for the past 30 action. gether, from the organize
years. "I'm an activist," Joiner explain- city government to the a
Joiner intends to maintain his ed. His active interest is in the ments for garbage collect
residence in Ann Arbor and set up problems of urbanization and the present in the big city surr
residence an the WSU campus in role law plays in solving them. In Wayne., That is the envi
Detroit. He will assume his new the Law School at Wayne he feels in which Joiner wishes to
duties on a part-time basis on De- he will be not only closer to these "Dean Joiner has had a
cember 1, and will commute be- problems, but also in a position guished career as a scho
tween Ann Arbor and Detroit. Af- where he can observe and do some- administrator," said Keast

sys em is very aangerous to Atmer-
ica."
I Although churches have no legal
sanctuary, the council will help
anyone in trouble with his draft
board. "A man must follow his
conscience; if he feels he is break-

.

ling CIndl, law hw is irnripr nn nhli_

ri of law mg; you s yawV, ne is unuer no o110 ii-
n be agation to serve," says Mrs. Fuller. negative reactions. The council is
can bea tn, yscontinuing its effort in this di-
rea," he, Not All Agree rection however

LADIES DAY
Ladies admitted for 60c 1 to 6 P.M.

felt that
A poorly
School,
t Wayne
Id. The
close to-
ation of
arrange-
ion, are
ounding
ronment
work.
a distin-
lar and
t in an-
t, "and
guild the
tion laid
his pre-
ef."

- 4 3 A, 3 Y 4 4 .
Not all Ann Arbor clergy agree "We're trying to make people
with the council, however, Rev. listen to what the protestors are
Roy V. Palmer, of the Church of saying," Mrs. Fuller explains.
Christ, insists the church "has no "Perhaps if people start listening
right in politics. I do not agree they will start working together
with the Inter-Faith Council. The for peace."

-h National CamPuS

nouncing the appointmen
he is well equipped to bu
Law School on the foundal
for so many years by h
decessor, Dean Arthur Nee

UNCLE RUSS presents in Detroit:
FUGS;
Fri., Nov. 24, Sat., Nov. 25
The Gang, Ashmollyan Quintet, & MC5's
GRANDE BALLROOM
Grand River at Beverly, one block south of Joy
8:30 P.M. Admission $3.00
Advanced ticket sales-J, L. Hudson's,
Grinnell's and Grande Box Office.

44

LSD -Filled
Cookies
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA,
Berkeley-University of California
officials are investigating the pos-
sibility that cookies spiked with
LSD were served at a sociology
seminar held in a student's home
off campus.
Two of the students, who appar-
ently were slipped the chemical
without their knowledge, under-
went agonizing "bad trips.'"
Both students became so emo-
tionally unglued they had to be
hospitalized.
Who made the cookies and pass-
ed them out to the unsuspecting
students has not been learned.
* *
Also at Berkeley, president-des-
ignatne Charles J. Hitch seems to
pilan on doing more than the Uni-
versity of California Regents had
planned on when they appointed
him.
Hitch, who will take over his new
job effective January 1, 1968, re-
cently looked beyond the univer-
sity's finaincial situation, his spe-
cialty, in a surprise statement on
war research.
Hitch stated a strong case
against universities doing war or
other classified research. "In gen-
eral, it is undesirable for a uni-
versity to carry on research whose
results cannot be published," he
said.
Hitch's stand is surprising be-
cause of his long association with
the RAND Corporation and the
Department of Defense, two organ,
izations which have been greatly
involved in classified research.
"Faculties all over the nation
tend to be more interested in re-
search and gradute students than
with teaching the undergraduate.
I'm pleased with the interest in
undergraduate curriculum on the
Berkeley campus," Hitch added.
* * '*'
HARVARD UNIVERSITY-Har-
vard Law School is still trying to
decide what to do about Walter
A. Winshall, 23. of Detroit, who
completed requirements for his de-
gree while also attending Mas-
sachusetts Institute of Technology
and holding two jobs.
Winshall's law degree was with-
held in June when Harvard learned
he also had been enrolled simul-
taneously in a master's degree pro-
gram at MIT's Sloan School of
Management, ran a computer pro-

gramming company in Boston, and
worked part time for a New York
investment firm.
Winshall, now working full time
in New York for Oppenheimer &
Co., an investment firm, offers "no
comment" to all questions con-
nected with the matter.
Winshall earned an almost
legendary reputation for his schol-
astic, business and social achieve-
ment as a student.
In addition to his heavy load of
studies at Harvard and MIT and
his two jobs, he was a teaching
assistant at MIT, a resident tutor
and member of the national men's
fraternity Alpha Epsilon Pi, a good
bridge player1, active in sports, an
avid reader, and dated frequently.
Friends of Winshall claim he
could do in two or three days the
work that most Harvard and MIT
students take a month or two to
do, and that he could learn a
course overnight.
* .* *
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYL-
VANIA-A Penn dermatologist has
found, after five years of research,
only one cure for acne. It is The
Pill.
Dr. Albert M. Kligman admini-
istered oral contraceptives to stu-
dents, and found he could achieve
a 100 per cent cure rate. After two
or three months, with 20 pills per
month, both male and female lost
all traces of acne.
Of course, all male patients be-
gan to lose their beards and sex
interest, too.
Kligman found that massive 1

doses of estrogen in The Pill stop-
ped the secretion of sebaceous oil,
the substance which clogs pores
and causes blackheads. Overdoses,
however, can cause "medical cas-
tration" in men. But the cure
works wonders on women.
"We had an ethical obligation
to tell the women what it was we
were giving them," Kligman con-
fessed. "We had to say 'Look, we
can cure your acne, but we're going
to have to give you contraceptives
to do it.'" Apparently none of the
girls coming to the acne clinic at
Penn's University Hospital object-
ed. And the cure was so remark-
able, Kligman said, "You can tell
how many women are using con-
traceptives these days by looking
at their faces."
* * *
YALE UNIVERSITY-Pledges to
refuse induction during the Viet-
nam war have been signed by al-
most 300 Yale University students
and 12 faculty members.
An advertisement in the Yale
Daily News, sponsored by the Yale
Draft Refusal Committee, listed a
total of 303 names of signers.
Their statement said they are
"men of draft age who believe that
the United States is waging an un-
just war in Vietnam. We cannot,
in conscience, participate in this
war. We therefore declare our de-
termination to refuse induction as
long as the U.S. is fighting in Viet-
nam."
The signers could dace up to five
years in prison and a $10,000 fine
if they refuse induction.

IP8UL NEWMN-
just bugs the Establishment as
COOL HAND WKE
sc o NDONN PEARCE " FRANK RPIERSON ' a nSTUART ROSENRF
Pa or GORDON CARROLL tECMICOLtORPAIEIShfION MWAER 1ROL.-SEENAIlE

I

_I

t

X

Wishing Everyone
a Happy
Thanksgiving
Holiday
When you return, we
will be playing a
2nd Holdover Week

6I AT40-9:A
640-:2 b
i.

Dial
NO 2-6264

Dail

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4diRail,

Ending Tonight
"THE TRIP"

I

DEAN CHARLES JOINER

Phone 434-0130
Exae eOt CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 6:30 P.M.
-
W T R OSUGGESiF e F tf mEAlES
WITH JAMES COBURN
PLUS
COLOR
APMUNTRAS

I

DIAL 8-6416
Starting Thanksgiving Day
Tomorrow, Thursday, There
Will Be Continuous Shows
Storting at 1 O'clock
To those of you who are going home
We Wish a Most Happy Holiday!

4

Shows at 1:00-3:35-6:15-8:55
Feature at 1:30-4:10-6:50-9:20

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on soen dire(t fom its
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