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November 19, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-19

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19,1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY - a

PAGE TREE

,

WORLD NEWS DEVELOPMENTS

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UN To Consider Mid East Resolutions

By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - Britain's
chief UN delegate claimed yester-
day that a British resolution for a
Middle East settlement had enough
votes to pass the Security Council,
but Latin American sources said
Argentina and Brazil might intro-
duce a competing resolution.
Lord Caradon of Britain, leaving
a conference with UN Secretary-
General U Thant, replied, "Cer-
tainly," when a reported asked if
he expected his resolution to be
adopted. He said he hoped that
would happen when the 15-nation
Ecumenical
Center AIMS
To Educate
(Continued from Page 1)
son points out, "have made amaz-
ingly unique contribuitions to the
world that Americans could bene-
fit from ... contributions in art,
music, philosophy - an under-
standing of what life is all about."
The Ecumencial Campus Cen-
ter, Rev. Dotson emphasized, is
trying to make Americans aware
of the significance of foreign
cultures like China's.
"The American attitude toward
the Buddhists in Vietnam is pol-
itical. Who ever said that democ-
racy was the highest form of
government?"
His organization, though, is
positive in its approach toward
peace, and does not take part
in protest.
Regarding conflicts in the Mid-
dle East and in Vietnam, Rev.
Dotson believes that "no one is
seriously asking why they are
taking place and what they mean,
but we still rush in and try to
solve the issues. We must become
educated about the real causes."
He said that any present action
in Vietnam has to be political,
but that unless President Johnson
is forced to examine the real
reasons for conflict, it would
happen again and again. "It looks
as if we're Just going to annihilate
the Vietnamese people."
Every year, the Ecumenical
Center in its various programs in-
volves at least a thousand of
Ann Arbor's some 1,800 foreign
students. Doubting whether that
alone proves anything, Rev. Dot-
son said that "beyond fifty or
sixty I must guess, but some stu-
dents are really changing."

council meets again at 3:30 p.m.
EST tomorrow but the debate
"could go through until Tuesday
night."
The Latin American sources
said Argentina and Brazil were
working with Britain to merge the
pending British resolution with a
still unpublished Latin American
draft. They said if this effort suc-
ceeded, there would be a British-
Latin American resolution before
the council, but if not, there would
be two resolutions, one British and
the other Latin American.
The council then would have
four resolutions pending. The Unit-
ed States alone and India, Mali
and Nigeria together submitted the
others on Nov. 7-12 days before
Britain's came in.
The four draft all ask Thant to
send a special representative to
seek settlement of the Arab-Is-
raeli war of last June 5-10 and
withdrawal of Israeli troops from
Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon.
Greek, Turkish
Cypriots Clash
NICOSIA, Cyprus - Greece
alerted its armed forces yesterday
after the Cypriot government an-
nounced Turkish air force jets
buzed Greek Cypriot villages, and
Turkish Cypriot snipers opened
fire on Greeks in Nicosia, wound-
in g four. Cypriot national guards-
men were on the alert and anti-
aircraft guns sprouted in Nicosia.
Turkish land, sea and air forces
-based in south-central Turkey
40 miles from Cyprus-were alert-
ed Friday.
In Ankara, Turkish officials de-
ned any Turkish air force planes
flew over Cyprus. Military activity
was noted around Ankara and on
the highways leading to the Medi-
terranean coast.
The alert for Greek forces was
ordered after a Foreign Ministry
spokesman in Athens warned that
any Turkish provocations could
seriously harm Greek-Turk rela-
A Kill' in
VIET ROCK
Nov. 27-30-8:30
5th Dimension
Centicore
TICKETS: Discount Records
Plaster of Paris

tions. Both nations are allies in
the North Atlantic Treaty Organ-
ization.
The new Cyprus crisis-smoul-
dering since the 1964 flareups that
nearly plunged Greece and Turkey
into war - started with sharp
battles in the villages of Kophinou
and Ayios Theodorus Wednesday.
Twenty-five Turks and two Greeks
were killed. Cypriot national
guardsmen overran the two vil-
lages in eight hours of fighting.
Long Viet Holiday
Truce Unlikely
SAIGON -- The allies aren't
likely to go along with three-day
cease-fires at Christmas and New
Year's and a seven-day halt for
Tet which the Communists an-
nounced yesterday.
There is no doubt that shorter
cease-fires, running one day at
Christmas and New Year and
perhaps 48 hours at Tet, the lunar
new year, will be observed by the
allies.
Such truces have been the rule
in recent years, though repeated-
ly marked by bloody incidents,
and President Nguyen Van Thieu
said Nov. 11 they probably would
be observed again this time.
But South Vietnainese and
American officials are unanimous
in saying the three-day and sev-
en-day truces announced by the
Viet Cong's National Liberation
Front would give the Communists

too much of an opportunity to
move supplies and men into the
South and to regroup their troops.
However, the two sides have
never agreed on a cease-fire. Each
has proclaimed its own. Because
of the informality of these ar-
rangements, the allies have al-
ways classified Communist at-
tacks during the truce periods as
incidents rather than violations.
One of the chief opponents on
the Allied side of a long cease-
fire, which would bring a corre-
sponding halt in the bombing of
North Vietnam, is Gen. William
C. Westmoreland, commander of
U.S. forces in Vietnam.
"We can live with" a brief
bombing pause, Westmoreland
said in Washington Wednesday
but added: "I'm not happy about
the prospect."
Russians Confirm
Orbital Missiles
MOSCOW-The Soviet Union
has developed orbital nuclear mis-
siles wtih devices enabling them
to break through an enemy's mis-
sile defenses, a Soviet military
commander claimed yesterday.
Marshal Nikolai I. Krylov, com-
mander in chief of Soviet strategic
rocket forces, made the announce-
ment at a Moscow meeting called
in connection with today's ibserv-
ance of Soviet Missile Forces Day.
He said the new missile was part
of a formidable stockpile designed

to protect the Soviet Union and:
"the entire world of socialism."
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara announced on Nov. 3
the United States had evidence
the Soviet Union was testing an
orbital bomb that could be put into
use in a year's time.
Asked about Krylov's claim, the
Defense Department in Washing-
ton said it had nothing further to
add to what McNamara said on3
Nov. 3.
An orbital weapon is launched
like the various spacecraft sent
up by the United States and Rus-
sia. It can be brought down on a:
pre-selected target.
The Soviet Union had acknowl-
edged before that it had orbital
missiles, but this was the most
explicit claim to date of their
capabilities.
The penetration devices were
especially significant in view of
U.S. plans to build a "thin" anti-
missile system that presumably
would be vulnerable to missiles
equipped with such devices.
The Soviet Union has developed
"new, powerful missiles capable
of delivering nuclear warheads to
the target along ballistic and or-
bital trajectories," Krylov said.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,
Student organization notices are not
accepted for Dublication. For more
information call 764-9270.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19
Day Calendar
School of Music Concert - Robert
Clark, Organist, Organ Works of
Bach: Mariners Church, 170 E. Jef-
ferson, Detroit, 4:00 p.m.
School of Music Concert - Concert
of Chamber Music: Rackham Lecture
Hall, 4:15 p.m.
Events Monday
Michigan Department of Education
- Division of Vocation Education Re-
search Co-ordinating Unit Work-
shop": Morning Session, Michigan
Union, 9:00 a.m.; Afternoon Session,
Michigan Union, 2:00 p.m.
Drugs, Brain and Behavior Seminar
- Dr Paul H. Posohel, Parke Davis
Research Laboratories, Ann Arbor,
"Measurement of the CNS Etimu-
lant Effects of MAO Inhibitors by
Self-Stimulation": M7412 Medical
Science Building, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Department of Philosophy Lecture -

Professor Elizabeth Anscombe, Somer-
ville College, Oxford, England, "Sub-
junctive Conditions": Auditorium C,
Angell Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Engineering Mechanics Seminar --
Dr. Ivor K. Mclvor, The University of
Michigan: 325 West Engineering Build-
ing, 4:00 p.m.
.University Senate Meeting, -- Rack.
ham Lecture Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Report of Chairman of the Univer-
sity Senate Assembly on activities of
the Assembly - Professor F'rank R.
Kennedy.
Report from President Hatcher on
Current Matters.

Report of Assembly's Advisory Com-
mittee on Student Relations -- Profes-
sor Leonard Greenbaum.
Report of Assembly's Advisory Com-
mittee on Research Policies -- Profes-.
sor Robert C. Elderfield.
School of Music Concert - Com-
posers Forum: School of Music Re-
cital Hall, 8:30 p.m.
Visitor on Campus -- Mother E.
O'Connor, R.S.C.J.sHead Librarian,
Manhattanville College, Purchase. N
Y.
General Notices
Flu Shots -- The last "flu shot clinic"
of the year will be held at the Health
from 8:00
(Continued on Page 8)

CINEMA LUILD
-TONIGHT-
MARLON BRANDO
in
ON THE WATERFRONT
Dir. Elia Kazan, 1954
with: Lee J. Cobb, Eva Marie Saint,
Karl Malden, and Rod Steiger.
WINNER OF 8 ACADEMY AWARDS
7:00 & ARCHITECTURE
9:05 AUDITORIUM
STILL ONLY 50c

CINEMA II
presents
THE BEATLES
in
"HARD DAY'S NGT
and
Chapt. 4 FLASH GORDON
7:00 and 9:15 P.M.
Aud. A, Angell Hall

How t Celebrate ;
rI
the Week AFTER Thanksgivingl
I: t
See the University Players
Department of Speech in
r 'r
aI
r r
. IMOLIERET Coeda
IE
THE
WIOU1D04E
6[NT[EEAN.
U
-U
A Roaring FRENCH Farce?
rI
Wed.-Sat., Nov. 29-Dec. 2 I
Trueblood Theatre-8 P.M.
r I
Sunday Matinee, Dec. 3-2:30 P.M. N
Enclosed find $ for (number) tickets
for each date checked below at the price circled. r
r r
r s
Wed., Nov. 29 Fri., Dec. 1
Sat., Dec. 2
Thur., Nov. 30 Sun., Dec. 3___...... r
r r
r $1.75 & $1.25 $2.00 & $1.50
r _____I enclosed a self-addressed stamped envelope. Molt My u
tickets to me.
r ,
* r
* NAME
r r
ADDRES
CITY STATFu
a PHONF ZIP CODE u
I r
Mail order to University Players, Department of Speech, the *
I University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104. Checks *
payable to University Players.'
r "
IMPORTANT NOTE: Ordet your tickets early.
We may be sold out before the show opens.
r ..
rwwswswwswsswwsmms+ sawrsirrmininin rrnm rsnwtstin rw~in w UrinuulhI

. ........... .

I

"Middle

East

Issues

Past

and

Present"

4

A

Member, Deputy Israeli Parliament

Former, Deputy Minister of Defense

Monda,

Nov.

20,

at

4:15

P.M.

Michgan

Union

Ballroom

Sponsors:

Moderator:

Israeli Students Organization
Guild House

Dean Francis A. Allen, Law School

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