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November 18, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-18

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER, 18, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1967 THE MIChIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Johnson

Welcomes

CEASE CONTRACT TALKS:
Teamsters Strike Detroit News;
Free Press Stops Publication

Responsible

Dissent

WASHINGTON {P} - President Iing-as when demonstrators block

Johnson, speaking at a press con-
ference yesterday, said he wel-
comes responsible dissent by earn-
est Americans.
He characterized critics this
way: "There are some hcpeful
people and there are- some naive
people in this country-and there
are some political people."
While saying he defends the
right to responsible dissent, John-
son emphasized several times his
opposition to "storm trooper bully-

streets, smash windows, shout
down public speakers and engage
in rowdyism."
Johnson also said he will meet
"when it is necessary" the Vietnam
peace campaign Sen. Eugene J.
McCarthy is threatening to wage
in Democratic presidential prim-
aries next year.
Johnson refused to say whether
he will run for a second full term
in 1968, but he acted and sounded
like a man seeking re-election.

Decisive U.S. Wins
Inspire Optlim1sm

By JOHN T. WHEELER
Associated Press News Analysis
SAIGON-During the past two
weeks U.S. and South Vietnamese
troops have smashed decisively
two of the Communists' biggest
offensives of the Vietnam war.
North Vietnamese and Viet
Cong regiments, by U.S. body
count, suffered more than 2,000
dead in two days-long battles.
They killed only one-tenth that
number on the allied side and lost
considerable prestige as a fight-
ing force.
American firepower and the
ability to move the equivalent of
a whole division or more to meet
threats as they appear spelled the
difference in both the savage
battles.
Westmoreland Optimistic
The fighting around Dak To in
the highlands and at Loc Ninh
north of Saigon appeared to sup-
port optimism voiced by Gen.
William C. Westmoreland over
the course of the war here.
Only six months ago the U.S.
commander said that despite
some favorable trendshedcould
foresee no end to the war. He now
believes the allied side will win
the, conflict.
Expected Offensive
Despite the two defeats, Saigon
still expects the Communists to
launch still another major offen-
sive this year, this one against
the Marines in the Khe Sanh area
just south of the demilitarized
zone. The Communists have been
most successful in attacks in this
region where American supply
lines are longest and theirs are
shortest.
There have been similar de-
feats for the Communists in the
past. Last spring the 9th Viet
Cong Division was destroyed as a
fighting force. The 9th was the
division which launched what
turned out to be suicidal attacks
on Loc Ninh; decimating two of
its best regiments, during the
first week of November.
The Viet Cong attacks have
served to polarize some U.S.
strength away from built-up areas
and toward three main border
pressure points. These are the
DMZ, the so-called B3 front on
the Cambodian border in the
highlands and north of War
Zone D on the Cambodian border.
Hanoi Buildup.
Hanoi's defense minister, Gen.
Vo Nguyen Giap, has steadily built
the number of regular units in
the South and more than match-
ed the buildup by the allies in
terms of trigger pullers.
However, a major new buildup
that will carry U.S. forces in
Vietnam up to 525,000 from the
current 470,000 will give West-
moreland another division of'
fighting troops. Two of the three
brigades will be crack paratroop-
ers of the 101st Airborne Division.
But just as the Communists
have failed to dislodge American
troops from their forward and

weaker positions, the allied side
has not been able to push the
Communists permanently out of
their major base areas. These in-
clude the A Shau Valley, the
mountains west of Hue, the Viet
An Valley south of Da Nang, the
Do Xa area in the highlands, War
Zones C and D and several Delta
areas.
By U.S. reckoning, some of the
biggest concentrations of Com-
munist forces are in Cambodia
where they are safe from all at-
tacks and in Laos where Air Force
bombing has met liimted success.
In conventional warfare, the
allied victories at Loc Ninh and
Dak To probably would have far-
reaching implications for the
Communists. But Hanoi's main
tactic still appears to call for con-
tinued major battles at whatever
cost, inflicting as many casualties
as possible, particularly on Ameri-
can troops for the impact that
would have in the United States.

He said the Communists are
seriously mistaken if they think
the United States will pull out of
Vietnam after the next election,
no matter who is chosen president.
Johnson was asked his assess-
ment of the situation in Vietnam
after talking with Gen. Westmore-
land and Ambassador Ellsworth
Bunker.
"I think every American heart
should swell with pride at what
U.S. forces are doing in Vietnar.
he said.
The American people want wars
and other contests to be decided
quickly, he said, adding "that's
not the kind of war we're fighting
in Vietnam."
Johnson was asked about the
economic situation.
"We want very badly to have a
tax bill just as quickly as we can
get it," he said, adding that there
is no indication that the House
Ways and Means Committee plans
to report one this year.
One of his administration's fail-
ures, he said, has been the inabil-
ity to convince Congress of the
need for a new tax bill.
"I think that's one of the great
mistakes the Congress will make,"
he said, saying that Chairman
Wilbur D. Mills, (D-Ark), of the
Ways and Means Committee and
House Republican Leader Gerald
R. Ford, of Michigan, "will live to
rue the day" because of the in-
flation and federal deficit, in the
event no tax increase is approved.
He said he knows tax increases
don't help in political polls but
"I think we can do it ... I think
we should do it."We have failed
up until now to convince them,"
he said, but he added he thinks
eventually Congress will pass the
legislation .

PHILADELPH

Dow Board Chairman Says
Business Hurt by Protests

Philadelphia police subdue over3
protesting the reported suspension
Vocational High School for takin
onstration.
BOLIVIAN TRIAL:
JDebray Co
For Aidinl
CAMIRI. Bolivia A 30-year.
prison sentence was imposed here
yesterday on Regis Debray, the1
young French author of a book
on how to spread Cuban com-
munism throughout Latin Amer-
ica.
Debray showed no emotion at {
the end 6f his seven-week military
trial as he heard himself coiivicted1
of helping Bolivia's leftist guerril-i
las, once led by the late Ernesto
Che Guevara.E
The specific charges against
Debray, Argentine Ciro RobertoI
Bustos and four Bolivians were
murder, robbery and subversion.
Bustos was also convicted and 1
sentenced to 30 years in jail, the1
maximum penalty under Bolivian
law. The Bolivians were acquitted.
Debray and Bustos were arrested
April 20 in a small settlement near
this oil town. George Andrew Roth,
a British photographer captured
with them, was later declared
innocent and released.
The pair admitted they had
been with the guerrillas operating
in southeast Bolivia's forested
mountains and said they had even
stood guard duty armed with M2
rifles. But they denied the crimes
with which they were charged.
Twelve witnesses t e s t i f i e d
against Debray and Bustos but
Freedumb
VIET ROCK'
Nov. 27-30-8:30
5th Dimension
Centicore
TICKETS: Discount Records
Plaster of Paris

DETROIT ()-The Detroit Free
Press will cease publication be-
cause of "actions of certain un-
ions," according to notices posted
yesterday.
The morning daily newspaper
joined the Detroit News, hit by
a Teamsters strike, in halting the
presses, leaving the nation's fifth
h " largest city without a publishing
daily newspaper.
Both papers are involved with
contract negatiations with the
Teamsters and other unions, al-
though no Teamster talks are set
at The News until Monday at the
earliest. The News halted publica-
-Associated Press tion Thursday.
IA PROTEST Contracts Expire
A PROTESTContracts with the Teamsters
3,500 Negro students who were and the two Detroit newspapers
,n of 16 pupils at Bok Technical expired at midnight Wednesday.
n part in a "black power" dem- Most other contracts with the
g rNews and the Free Press expire
Nov. 30.
____Craft union leaders said pri-
vately the Teamsters strike had
taken place before a crisis point
in bargaining on a new contract
was reached. Some union leaders
felt the wage increases could have
o n v icted!been obtained without a strike.
The two papers, with a combined
circulation of well over a million,
traditionally face barganiing prob-
lems with a solid front.
Joint Negotiations
gave no evidence that directly John B. Olson, general man-
connected either with combat ac- ager of the Free Press, said the
tivities. two newspapers had jointly ne-
Debray insisted that he had gotiated contracts with the unions
joined the rebels as a journalist as the Detroit Newspaper Publish-
for a Mexican magazine and that ers Association.
Guevara had turned down his re- Olson said, "The refusal to pub-
quest to take part in combat. lish the News is, in effect, a strike
This connection was supported against both papers."
by entries in Guevara's dairy say- The News shut down when
by ntiesinGuear's aiy sy-Teamsters Union members put u
ing Debray would have been more TasesUinmmesptup
useful to the leftist movement token picket lines at the building
elsewhere lwhich houses the afternoon daily.
The Free Press building is less
Bolivian authorities described than three block away.
Debray as a close friend of Cuban In 1964, a strike at the two
Prime Minister Fidel Castro and newspapers kept them out of pub-
said he had visited Bolivia twice lication for 134 days-one of the
before as an advance agent for longest shutdowns of metropolitan
the guerrillas. newspapers ever.
Defense lawyers declined to say Both papers also went into in-
whether they would appeal. tensive negotiations with the In-
DR. ROBERT H. HAMILL
Dean of Chapel, Boston University
speaks on
WHAT CHRISTIANS AND
MARXISTS HAVE TO TALK
ABOUT TOGETHER
Sunday, 7:09 P.M. at
Wesley Lounge, First Methodist Church
State and Huron Streets
Dr. Hamill will also preach at the morning .
worship services at First Methodist Church
at 9:00 and 11:15 a.m. on the subject
"Two New Proofs For God."
Public Is Invited

By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA-Public school
students in both Philadelphia and
Newark, N.J. marched on local
school boards yesterday.
Helmeted Philadelphia police of-
ficers put down. a near riot by
some 3,500 Negro school pupils.
In Newark, three hundred Bar-
ringer High School students pro-
tested unsafe conditions at the
city's largest school.
S* * *
CARDIFF, Wales-A bomb blast
smashed the doorway and entrance
hall of Cardiff's Temple of Peace
yesterday when Lord Snowdon ar-

rived for a conference on Prince
Charles' in vestiture as Prince of
Wales.
Police blamed the explosion on
extremists demanding home rule
for the Welsh.
WASHINGTON - The House
yesterday passed the lowest for-
eign-aid appropriation bill in the
20-year history of the program.
The $2.19-billion money bill in-
cluded provisions designed to re-
strict the purchase of modern wea-
pons by underdeveloped nations re-
ceiving aid.

U I

AFTER HOURS
Featuring THE PRIME MOVERS
Plus Other Entertainment

WHEN?
Every Fri. & Sat. Night
1 :30 A.M. to 4:30 A.M.
cover $1 .00

WHERE?
The Fifth Dimension
216 W. Huron
Call 761-7866

............

ternational Typographical Union The company had offered about
which represents 700 workers on 4 per cent each year. Teamster
the two papers. drivers now average $150.15 a
The News laid off all employees, week.
except those in the editorial and The strike at The News and
business office, and said they intensive bargaining between the
would be recalled "when condi- Free Press and the Teamsters be-
tions permit." gan a few days before both papers
The Teamsters demand a 15 per were scheduled to have large Sun-
cent basic pay increase this year day sections this weekend in con-
and a similar boost next year for nection with the Detroit auto
a two-year contract at the News. show, which opens tomorrow.
world News Roundup

TONIGHT at
Dr s. A
Door opens at 8 P.M.

1421 HILL STREET

DETROIT (A)-The chairman of
the board of Dow Chemical Co.
said yesterday his company is
being hurt by protests'against the
firm's supplying napalm to the
Defense Department, but he
strongly defended the role Dow
plays in supporting American
troops in Vietnam.
Carl A. Gerstacker of Midland,
Mich., told a regional meeting of
the Society of American Business
Writers that Dow is being "hurt
by a boycott of consumer products
, hurt by people saying -they
should sell our stock ... hurt by
some of our important people
sending so much time answering
criticisms against the company."
He said he did not know the ex-
tend of damage caused to the com-
pany by napalm production, which
Dow entered simply by submitting
a low bid to the government.
Bid High
"All we would have to do is bid
high and we would be out of the
napalm business," he said.
"People call my wife, put press-
ure on the children of our execu-
tives at school, and make the com-

parison that we are like the Ger-
man industries that made gas
chambers for Hitler to massacre
the Jews," he said.
But, he said, he could not con-
ceive that he would ever tell Amer-
ican soldiers in Vietnam that "we
will not send you weapons."
Send Best Weapons
"I don't like any war," he said.
"We have sent our men to die and
fight and we are going to give
them the best weapons we can."
Other Dow officials said recently
that they have had a 25 per cent
increase in the number of college
interviews, despite the campus
demonstrations. But Gerstacker
said today that the firm's recruit-
ment of graduates has been hurt.
Noting that percentages do not
tell the story, he said the quality
of men Dow is able to attain may
be affected by the protest.
He said the company has no
plans to alter its recruiting pro-
gram.
Gerstacker said napalm, made in
the Torrance, Calif., plant, repre-
sents only one half of one per cent
of total Dow sales and "is insigni-
ficant to our business."

MICHAEL COONEY
DOING SONGS of all shapes and sizes from blues to children's songs,
traditional ballads to topical songs, playing banjo, 6 & 12 string
guitars, harmonica, penny whistle, uke, and kazoo.
On the Monterey Folk Festival (May, 1963)
"Two young men proved to be both natural show-stoppers and serious
performers of rare skill. Bob Dyln ... Michael Cooney was not even
known to festival officials, but he showed up in Friday night's hoote-
nanny and went on stage Saturday afternoon to save an otherwise
dull concert .. . a high point of the entire weekend."-San Francisco
Examiner.
$1.50 Cover includes entertainment and refreshments
($1.00 after 10:30 P.M.)

CII INLABULD

TONIGHT and SUNDAY

U

MARLON BRANDO
in
ON THE WATERFRONT
Dir. Elia Kazan, 1954
with: Lee J. Cobb, Eva Marie Saint,
Karl Malden, and Rod Steiger.
WINNER OF 8 ACADEMY AWARDS

PEACE CORPS
PLACEMENT TEST
SATURDAY-9 A.M.-2 P.M.
BEGINNING ON THE HOUR
3524 SAB

7:00 &
9:05

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

STILL ONLY 50c

...

I

~I t l

THE
ag w

31Iki I

, 111 ± 1

"MIDDLE EAST ISSUES

PAST AND PRESENT"
SHIMON PERES, M.K.
Member, Israeli Parliament
Former, Deputy Minister of Defense
Monday, Nov. 20, 4:15 P.M.
Michigan Union Ballroom
Sponsors:
Israeli Students Organization
Guild House

" ULYSSES'A SUPERB FILM!"
Life Magazine
FORCEFUL AND
RESPECTABLE '" -
CINEMA ART.' w
-Bosley Crowther,
New York Times '

I
g

4i
BY A STRIKING AND ORIGINAL TRAGI-COMEDY
STUDS TERKEL with

ALTEREA

STRICK

-AP JOYCE S

MART HULSWIT

E

11

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