100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 17, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE TWO

THE M CA7tzAN nAlFT.Y

lipim In A *tr lporvTvltNlw vv* Y M a # AA M

as as 1aaCahl~f la f lNTr
I'---l E SP ~ U. IbAU.J

F L I JIX, £NOVVMBER 17, 1967

17

t

cinema

'Cool Hand Luke': They Love His Eyes

By BARBARA HOCKMAN
-Gordon? Rosenberg here. I've
got Pearce and Pierson working
on the lines for the Newman reels
that I'm goiig' to direct. Will you
take it? We're gonna be real
tight with spending so you're the
kind of producer we need. The
cast is about sixty people, and it's
all -one small set - a southern or
south - appalachian work farm.
You know, one of those timeless
little country prisons with one
wooden barracks house. They call
it a "house of correction" and
the prisoners do road work. So
we've got this role for Newman
that seems just right for the time
- he's the usual winner-loser
but we don't blow it up real big;
we're leaving the whole story, you
know, in a small world, and even
though Newman's the big guy,
it'll be such a small world that
his man-power will be about iife-
size.
It's Newman and a piece of
prison life with a couple of sym-
bols running through, like the
chief warden's cane, leather
jacket, and reflecting sunglasses.
And, oh yeh, get this, we open
with a full-screen view of the red
"violation" sign inside parking
meters and then we cut to a
medium-closeup of Newman chop-
ping heads off of parking meters
- and then the prison life starts.
Yeh, sure it's. okay to have him
put in jail for doing that; like I
said,.it's a small world we're tak-
ing about.
No, we won't overdue the vio-
Ience bit. There's got to be a
certain amount of natural cruelty
and meanness to the guards, but
for instance, we've got a guy
crying when the manhunting dog
dies" and* the sincere confession
from another of "I ain't never kilt
no white man," as he totes his'

rifle. And we get a little pictureI
of sociology by seeing Newman'sI
mother visit the farm.,
Well, no, I wouldn't call it real-
ism. I mean, what he does is
mostly. impossible. Eating fifty
hard-boiled eggs in an hour to
win a bet. Wearing a bottle opener;
on a chain around his neck. And;
of course, "running" away three1
times. That's the main theme,
what gets us from the beginning
to the end.

He's still the same guy who
wants no "boss" and no "rules
or regulations," yet doesn't know
what he wants. He's got some
lines about looking for God where
he calls him "Old-Timer." He's
a guy with as much wit as the
audience could want to expect,
and he uses his muscle without
overly twitching it. But listen,
there's a twist - he knows he's
gonna die in that small hole
and he does.

Will the people want him to
die? Of course not, but I think it
comes off okay. It's no real big
tragedy. No wild jazzy music, just
usual background filler and a
couple of prison folk songs.
Will the critics like it? Well, you
know, like I already said, it's a
small job. The lines will all de-
pend on Newman's grins. But it
is Paul ,Newman; and you know
how they love his eyes.

The National Campus
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO- President" which had allegedly
Students at the University of Colo- been deleted.
rado voted overwhelmingly this The first appearance of the re-
week for the legalization of manl-
unaskd for ealation of thI prints in Canada was in the under-
uana, asked for escalation of th e1 graduate newspaper at McGill Uni-
Vietnam war, and rejected by 2 togrdaenwpertMcilU-
1 a motion that the school affiliate versity in Montreal. The adminis-
with the National Student Asso- tration accused the "McGill Daily"
elation (NSA). editors of "publishing obscene!
Over 25 per cent of the student libel."
body turned out for the student TdA
elections and referendum which Those charged: Peter Allmut,
was called the "heaviest vote ever." editor in chief: Pierre Fournier,

KENNY BURRELL
QUARTET
GREAT; GUIIl
JOHNNY SMITH
QUARTET

rA

BOLA SETE
TRIO
RS GALORE
GAYBOR SZABO
QUINTET

i

MASONIC TEMPLE
THANKSGIVING NITE-Thursday, 8 P.M.
Tickets on sole at Masonic Temple, Grinnell's, J. L. Hudson stores
Call 769-5827 between 5-9

4
4

'Riddle' Offers Candid View

By JILL CRABTREE
"Give Me a Riddle," a Peace
Corps film being shown tonight at
Angell Hall at 4:15 p.m., is less a
recruitment film than a counter-
point of attitudes and perceptions.
Filmed in Nigeria by David
Schickele, a returned Corpsman,,
"Give Me a Riddle" judiciously
avoids any trace of "whistle whilef
you work." This theme would be
pretty passe to a college audience
which has definite reservations
about the wisdom of white men
moving in on a black country and
educating the people..
Instead, the film records candid
reactions-favorable and unfavor-
able, from corpsman and village
leaders alike-about the work of
the Peace Corps, and the breaking
up of the old tribal life that is so
much a part of the changing Afri-
can fabric.
I am informed that "some of
the Peace Corps people in Wash-
ington who have never been over-
seas don't like this film very much
because it strikes too close to the
truth."k
I can see why. What was to me

the most exciting scene in the film
would give any consistent Peace
Corps public relations man at!
least a mild case of heart failure.
The .scene shows a hill-top bull
session between ex-corpsman Ro-
ger Landram, who has returned to3
the village he worked in, and two
young native leaders.
At first the conversation is a
game. The village leaders have
been to Universities in large cities
and returned-as few do- to theirJ
native homes. They'mock the dog-
mas heard at the Universities and
shout at Landram, "Down with
imperialism, industrialism, coloni-
alism and capitalism. White mana
go home!"
But the shouting takes on a
realistic edge and the young lead-
ers begin to reveal the real objec-
tions they have to white men in
their country.
Then, because of the friendship
between the men, the dialogue
again lapses into a joking tone.
One of the young men says to his
friend, "You say to the white man
go home, yet you borrow his cigar-
ettes."
HOIIC

The answer comes back, "White
man go home, leave your cigarettes
behind."
More truth is revealed in this
scene than in any brochure on
"the difficult job the Peace Corps
must perform."
Those who watch a film for the
precision of technique and the
beauty of scene will find "Give
Me a Riddle" professional, often
inspired. Those who watch a film
for the ideas it presents and the
emotions it invokes will find it
exciting.
They may well be taken aback.
It is an rare "recruiting" film
which asks its audience to think
twice about joining.
Phone 434-0130
E&a~mcaOw CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 6:30 P.M.
FREE HEATERS
COLUMBIA PICTURES Preseits
IN A MARTIN MANULIS PRODUCTION
PANAVISION'EASTMAN.COLOR
PLUS. ..
SAVAGE HELL BREAKS LOOSE'
RIBEITI
THEE
a t"
WITH JACK LORD

Over 2,000 voters requested the
legalization of marijuana with re-
strictions as in the case of alcohol.
N~early 1.500 favored preserving the
existing laws while 517 voters de-
manded legalization without any
restrictions.
In a close vote, 1,142 students
asked for escalation of the Viet-
nam war in hopes of negotiations.
Although 1,000 voted for de-esca-
lation in hopes of negotiations, 962
demanded total military victory.
330 favored immediated withdraw-
al with no negotiations.
McGILL UNIVERSITY, Mon-
treal-The reprints of an article'
originally published in Paul Krass-
ner's anti-establishment magazine,
"The Realist," has caused an up-
roar on Canadian college cam-
puses.
The article, entitled "The Parts
That Were Left Out of the Ken-
nedy Book," first appeared in the
May, 1967 "Realist" as a satirical
condensation ,of sections of Wil-
liam Machester's "The Death of a

supplement editor: and writer
John Fekete, in whose column the
article appeared.
Last Monday a sit-in was staged
at the university's administration
building protesting the actions of
the administrators; the students
planned to remain until the char-!
ges gainst the members of the
paper were dropped.j
On Thursday, they broke into
the principal's office and the policeI
were called. A staff member ofI
the paper estimated the size of the
crowd at "100-150 policemen and
400-500 students." Three persons

TONIGHT and SATURDAY at
Dooro pens at 8 P.M.

1421 HILL STREET

MICHAEL COONEY
DOING SONGS of all shapes and sizes from blues to children's songs,
traditional ballads to topical songs, playing banjo, 6 & 12 string
guitars, harmonica, penny whistle, uke, and kazoo.
On the Monterey Folk Festival (May, 1963)
"Two young men proved to be both natural show-stoppers and serious
performers of rare skill. Bob Dylan . . . Michael Cooney was not even
known to festival officials, but he showed up in Fiday night's hoote-
nanny and went on stage Saturday afternoon to save on otherwise
dull concerts. . . a high point of the entire weekend."-San Francisco
Examiner.
($1.00 Cover includes entertainment and refreshments)

were arrested.
The Student Council, the stu-
dents' own disciplinary body, re-
fused to sentence the "Daily" de-
fendants on the libel charges, but
will act on a charge of "poor
taste." The editor, if he is found!
guilty of this account, will be re-
placed. Allmut and Fournier both
agree that the article should never!
have been published and they'
stand together before the Senate
Disciplinary Committee on this
basis. Fekete has retained a Civil
Liberties Union lawyer to defend
his column and its publication.
1

I

NATIONAL 6ENEIRAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN TWEATRESa Mon. thru
FOXGFri.
375 No. MAPLE D.-7691300Sat-Sun.
The glamour
and
g~ratness...
The speed
and
speecc/!

Thurs. 8:00 P.M.
6:00-9:00
2:00-5:15-8:45

HELD
OVER!

m I 0

Dial
8-6416

A -rcD

jr i. ri n URmw
Featuring THE PRIME MOVERS
Plus Other Entertainment

Freedumb
VIET ROCK
Nov. 27-30-8:30
5th Dimension

WHEN?
Every Fri. & Sat. Night
1:30 A.M. to 4:30 A.M.
cover $1 .00

WHERE?
The Fifth Dimension
216 W. Huron
Call. 761 -7866

"ROGER CORMAN'S BEST PICTURE. A quite remark-
.able film, striking and imaginative."
-Saturday Review
ALOVELYS fOEATH
SamuelZ.Arkoff & JamesH. Nicholson
Roger Corman's Production of
MPSYCHEDELlC COLOR REc o
E FONDA SUSAN STRASB ERG FOR MATURE
PET

IN SUPER PANAVISION' AND METROCOLOR
I- - - - - - - - -
Order Your Daily Now-
Phone 764-0558

E MPSE3i

4

Join The Michigan Daily

TATE
f} }

005fKateandher mate
battle it out -with noholds
ba rred ano'noswws cut'

EI E

just bugs the Establishment as
CDOL HDND WKE

Dial
NO 2-6264

V

I

4 SHOWS DAILY
1:50

we've

fir

got here 4:30
is a 7:15

I

i

PInI I I CI 1 Alu ci I;I L 1111111111IMI ~ .'. xJ~N 'OlIe IfAVM~U~J

Executive Producer RICHARD McWHDRU

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan