100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHICAN DAILY

WE~DNESDAY. NOVEMRWS. Io

I TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

a~r Z sIN 4i xjv~lz Fjy MR, , '

14

i

IANNAH, MAY INVOLVED:

I

Land Booms at MSU

Debates
Role, V

until
HRC
lidity

NEW REPUBLICAN:
Nunn Elected Gov.
SIn. Close Ky-%. Contest

ORGANIZATION NOTICES

(Continued from Page 1)
Hannah claims he was forced
to sell his holdings because of
an increase in assessments and
property taxes in Meridian Town-
ship. An official at the Meridian
Township Board of Assessors re-
ports that Hannah's acreage was
reassessed in 1966. The five con-
tiguous parcels Hannah owned
there were assessed in 1965 at
$157,000, supposedly 38 per cent
of the market value of the land.
In 1966 the assessment was raised
to $282,000.
Rising Assessment
The Board of Assessors says it
has been unable to keep up with
the rising land values since its
last general assessment in 1958,
and was forced to reassess the
property in 1966. Similarly, prop-
erty taxes have gone up 25 per
cent in the area since 1963.
MSU Vice-President for Busi-
ness and Finance and Treasurer
since 1947 Philip J. May is one
of the five directors of the Neller
Company, according to the firm's
annual report filed with the At-
torney General in May, 1967.
When asked if he were still
a member of the board of Neller
Company, May replied, "It is
a very informal company I have
never had any stock in the com-
pany. I have no financial interest
in the company. About once a
year the Nellers call me up and
we eat dinner together and chat
informally.
"I have never discussed Mr.
Hannah's property with them,'
May says. "I suppose if the an-
nual report says I'm on the board,
then I must be on the board."
However, a spokesman for the
Neller Company says May was
at one time on the board but has
since resigned his post.
Fair Housing?
The Neller Company, one of
Lansing's largest real estate com-
panies, and the firm to which
Hannah chose to sell the valuable
acreage, has been the target of
complaintssfrom a number of
Negro civil rights groups in the
Lansing area.
According to Benjamin Gibson,
chairman of the Legal Redress
Committee of the Lansing NAA-
CP, Richard Neller told a group
of N AA C P members in a
meeting in his office that "it
was the practice of his company
to discriminate in the sale and
rental of housing. 'It's just a mat-
ter of economics,' he said. He felt
it would hinder his sales to whites.
He said only at that time when
they are compelled to do it will
they comply with the statutes."
According to Ralph Bonner,
director of the Greater Lansing
Urban League, "Neller has in-
dicated that they will not jeopar-
dize the sale of housing in their
subdivisions by selling homes to
Negroes. What is economically
feasible is what they do."
Bonner has filed a suit this
year against the Neller Company
before the state Civil Rights Com-
mission, challenging an adden-
dum clause in the Neller sales
contract which says the owner
has the right to sell to anyone
he wishes. "You're not licensed
by the state to discriminate,"
Bonner explains.

MSU Prof. of Education Robert
Green, a Negro, says he has had
similar difficulties with the Nel-
ler Company.
"Negroes have had an almost
impossible time in purchasing
homes through the Walter Neller
agency and especially in his new
subdivisions," Green says.
"In 1963, Neller's agent told me
after I saw a house that it wasn't
available. A white friend of mine
then went to ask about the house
and they proceeded to show it to
him. The Federal Housing Admn-
istration in Grand Rapids forced
Neller to show my wife and I the
home, but we decided against it.
Nelier verballydabused me over
the phone," he says.
"Neller controls a significant
amount of property in East Lan-
sing and over the years this prop-
erty has been closed to Negroes
unless it was situated in an all-
Negro neighborhood. I personally
had to fight to get a home in this
city," Green concludes.
However, Richard Neller denies
the allegations of discrimination.
"If you look at civil rights agen-
cies in this town or any other
city, you might find that large
real estate firms are the first
to be tested." Neller expains.
"We are one of the larger ones
and therefore one of the first one
to be tested. It is only natural that
any group with civil rights and
housing interests would go after
one of the larger real estate firms.
A firm that doesn't do anything
doesn't get into any trouble," he
says.
Holding Company
The Neller Company rents an
office building at 1111 Michigan
Ave. An agent for the Neller
Company says the building is own-
ed by Philip May. However, ac-
cording to records in the Ingham
County Register of Deeds Office,
the property is owned by the Philip
Jesse Company.
The directors of the Philip Jesse
Company are Mrs. Viola May, wife
)f Vice-President Philip Jesse May,
Robert G. May of Sioux Falls,
South Dakota, and Warren May
of Pierre, South Dakota.
In order to construct the 45,000
square-foot office building, the
Philip Jesse Company secured a
$1.1 million mortgage from the
Michigan National Bank. Accord-
ing to MSU comptroller Paul
Rampsa, Michigan National Bank
serves as the chief financial agent
for MSU.
The building at 1111 Michigan
Avenue opened in June of this
year. Occupants of the building
include International Business Ma-
chines, Inc., Michigan Bell Tele-
phone Company and Michigan
Hospital Service (Blue Cross).
IBM occupies the first two
floors of the four story building
and pays $5.50 a square foot in
rent. It is estimated that IBM's
rent is in the area of $100,000 a
year.
IBM-MSU
MSU officials were unable to
give a total figure on the amount
of business transacted between
IBM and the university.
However, there are at least four
digital computers made by IBM in
operation at MSU with a variety
of card sorters and key punch
machines being used by various de-
partments. The MSU data proces-

sing section rents a computer from
IBM for approximately $35,000 per'
month, according to Frank Mar-
tin, director of the data processing
section.
IBM computers are also used by
the Dairy Herd Improvement As-
sociation, MSU Food Stores, the
urban planning division, and the
education and research division.
The MSU central computer,
however, was built by Control Data
Corporation.
May purchased the land on
which the building is situated from
the John and Elizabeth Whiteley
Foundation, a charitable trust with
$1.4 million in asseets, according
to the Charitable Trusts Division
of the Attorney General's office.
The purpose of the foundation
as stated in its charter is to main-
tain an Episcopal theological semi-
nary and a home for retired Epis-
copal ministers and their wives.

i

Councilmen Approve
New Members, Call
For 'Cross-Section'
By MICHAEL ROBERTS
The effectiveness of the Human
Relations Commission (HRC) was
the topic of heated discussion
during Monday night's meeting
of the Ann Arbor City Council.
The discussion stemmed from the
confirmation of three mayoral ap-
pointments to the Commission.
However the councilmen made
it clear that they were not ob-
jecting to the three new members
Poor Representation
Many councilmen felt that the
HRC did not give a fair repre-
sentation of all the people in

(Continued from Page S'

i

May bought two parcels of land Ann Arbor. They said that the
from the foundation, one in the Commission did not constitute a
name of Philip J. and Viola May true cross-section of the city.
a t~he~ n r in the na eof E Councilman James C. Riecker (R-

Philip Jesse Company. May sold=
part of the first parcel to Alan
Ginsburg and Steven Annas. An-
nas said yesterday that his firm
intends to build 93 apartment
units on the land immediately and
an additional 44 units at a future
date.
$150,004
May bought the first parcel of
land for close to $150,000 accord-
ing to documents filed in the of-
fice of the Ingham County Register
of Deeds. The price of the second
parcel, purchased by Philip Jesse
Company, was not disclosed. Gins-
burg and Annas did not disclose
f~hP fialP nin an Wry nill nf

Second Ward) said the Commis-
sion was made up of too many
"activists."a
He went on to say, "It seems
as is we'vetaken all these activists
off their soap boxes and put them
all into one big room where they
can shout at each other. What we
should have is something tike one
housewife, one business man and
one Negro - a real cross-section
of all the people in Ann Arbor."
Activists?
Councilman LeRoy A. Cappaert
(D-Fifth Ward) disagreed, say-
ing that the HRC was not com-
posed of 'activists.' "Maybe thats
what it needs, he said. "In De-

last night, hinting that she may
now seek a congressional seat next
year.
The Boston campaign centered
around the racial issue in Boston
schools. Mrs. Hicks, a member of
the School Committee, opposed
busing of the schools saying, "I'm'
for neighborhood schools."
Mrs. Hicks, who began all her
campaign speeches with "You
Know Where I Stand," was defeat-
ed in the primarily Negro sections
of Boston.
Dem. John Bell Williams, hav-
ing lost his congressional senority
for refusing to endorse his party's
presidential ticket in '64, swept
into a landslide victory over Re-
publican Rubel L. Phillips for the
Mississippi Governor.
An only moderate turnout was
was atribufed tot he fact that
reported in the state's precincts
both candidates were hard-core
segregationists.
Williams, a 48 year old veteran
of two decades in Congress, con-
'ducted a low-key campaign and
avoided controversy.
Democratic Mayor James H. J.
Tate won a surprising re-election
against Republican Dist. Atty. Ar-
len Specter in Philadelphia. With
only a few paper ballots remain-
ing to be counted. Tate had cap-
tured 348,289 votes to Specter's
319,415.
Specter had left the Democratic
party ranks in '65 to make a
successful run for the district at-
torney as a Republican.
Tate overcame a party split
after the Philadelphia Democratic
machine refused to support him in
the primary. Specter, who wanted
to be the fourth largest cities'
first Jewish mayor, conceded de-
feat less than an hour and a half
after the polls closed.
New York voters defeated with
56 per cent of the vote in a pro-j
posed new state constitution which
would have abolished a ban of
public aid to parochial schools.
The constitution was defeated
primarily in up-state New York
after taking a marginal lead in
the metropolitan area.
Virginia elected its first Negro
ENDS
TODAY Is L
at the Camp
for any and
to the MatineesI

USE OF THIS CULUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officiallyS
recognized and registered student ora-
flivatiofls only. Forms are available tn
room 1011 SAB.
* * *
The following is the results of Block
Drawing for Soph Show: 1. AlphaI
Kappa Lambda 2. Tau Kappa Epsilon
3. Tau Delta Phi 4. Zeta Beta Taua
5. Kelsey House 6. Sigma Phi Epsilon
7. Delta Chi 8. Alpha Tau. Omega 9.
Hinsdale House 10. Sigma Pi 11. Scott
House 12. Trigon 13. Phi Sigma Delta
14. Sigma Nu 15. Phi Epsilon Pi 16.
Theta 'Xi 17. Sigma Phi 18. P1 Lambda
Phi 19. Fredrick House 20. Alpha Epsi-
lon Phi 21. Alpha Xi Delta 22. Straus.
House 23. Anderson House 24. Phi Kappa
STau 25. Delta Upsilon 26. Michigan
House 27. Sigma Alpha Mu 28. Alpha
Epsilon Pi 29. Taylor House 30. Frost
House. Pick up your tickets as soon asj
possible at the Soph Show block ticket
office in the Lydia Mendlessohn Theatre1
between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. All
orders must be paid for at this time.
* * *
Baha'i Student Group, informal dis-
cussion: "Order out of Chaos," Fri. Nov.
10, 8:00 p.m., 520 N. Ashley. Call 662-3548
if you need transportation, all welcome.
* * *
UM Physical Therapy Club, Dr. Sulli-;
van, Pediatrician, will present childrenj
and relate their diseases to physical
therapy, Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m., third floor
conference room, University Hospital. j
* * *1
UM Amateur Radio Club invites all
interested students to attend its meet-
ing on Wednesday, Nov. 8 in room 2080
East Engineering Bldg. at 7:00 p.m. t
* * *
Engineering Council, meeting, Nov. 9,
7:00 p.m., SAB 3511.1
* * *
UM Scottish Country Dance Society,
dance meeting every Wednesday, 8:00-
10:30 p.m., WAB lounge.
* * *l
UM Rifle Club, invites you to learn!
to shoot every Wednesday, 7-9 p.m.,j
ROTC Range. ,,
Deutscher Verein, kaffeestunde everyl
Wednesday, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze.

University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Wed. Nov. 8, 10:00-Mid-
week student led devotion.
Graduate Assembly, general meeting,
wed. Nov. 8, 7:30 p.m., East Conference
Room (fourth floor), Rackham Bldg.
Dean Spurr will be present for a discus-
sion of matters of interest to graduate
students.
' Across
Campus
International experts on popu-
lation growth will examine "Fer-
tility and FamilyhPlanning: A
World View" at the University
next Wednesday through Friday.
Nov. 15-17.
Coming from Asia, L a t i n
America, Europe, and the United
States, s o c i a 1 and biological
scientists will discuss need for
family planning, effectiveness of
various techniques, means of mo-
tivating people and progress of
national programs.
The conference is the last of
five m a j o r Sesquicentennial
events.
"The program will involve au-
thorities in areas of population
growth and development who will
consider medical, demographic,
sociological and technological as-
pects of this problem with special
attention to the needs of develop-
ing countries," explained Dr. S. J,
Behrman, program chairman and
director of the, Center for Re-
search in Reproductive Biology. ,

S sal priceana may cui.a n ottroit they've appointed some of
be reached for comment. the 'activists' to the New De-
Harry Hubbard, secretary of the troit Committee. We should learn
Whiteley Foundation, is according a few lessons from the Detroit
to Martindale and Hubbell Law situation."
Directory, the legal representative However he added that he also
for Heatherwood Farms Dairy, felt the HRC was a poor cross-
Heatherwood Farms was recently section of the city.
awarded a $545,000 contract to The term "long hot summer'
supply MSU with dairy products, came up several times during the
MSU closed down its own dairy discussion. Councilman H. C.
because they said it was inade- Curry (D-First Ward) said that
quate to meet growing needs. he believed Ann Arbor was head-
Heatherwood Farms submitted the ing for "serious trouble."
lowest of seven bids, according to He went on to say, "I am not
an official at the MSU Food Stores making any predictions about any
Office. 'long hot summers' but as I see
Clifford McKibbin, a Lansing it the handwriting is on the wall
realtor and president of the White- and we are just running away.
ley Foundation, would not reveal Curry said the city is in a "very
the sale price of the land bought dangerous situation."
by the Philip Jesse Company. He Councilman Eunice Burns (D-
said, "the trustees of the Whiteley First Ward) told Mayor Wendell
foundation have the right to sell E. Hulcher that she had many
land whenever they wish. We times in the past pointed out the
thought we were using our best inadequacy of the commission.
judgment in selling the land to Mr. "A large segment of the people
May." are just not being heard," she said.

KEVIN H. WHITE
member of the state legislature
since the reconstruction period fol-
lowing the Civil War. Dr. W. Fer-
guson Reid, a Negro surgeon, was
running fourth in a field of 11 for
eight seats in the Virginia House
of Delegates late last night.
In an important election Repub-
licans seized control of the New
Jersey legislature. Republicans
held a 30-8 edge in the 80 member
assembly and a 17-6 margin in the
40 seat senate.
Republican Ann Uccellos upset
the Dem. Mayor of Hartford, Conn.
Richard G. Lugar, 35, a Repub-
lican businessman was elected
mayor of Indianapolis, Ind., up-
setting incumbent Democratic
mayor in a campaign which liken-
ed the city administration to the
Johnson administration.
In a key southern upset, Ronnie
Thompson, a Republican gospel
singer, upset the Democratic may-
or of Macon, Ga.

El

i

AST 9 DAYS
"SUPERB!
*
VHMOVING,
AND
-Wanda Hale,
New York Daily News
--Starts I1 /17-
'Taming of the Shrew"

SIDNEY
]POITIUR
in JAMES GLAVELL'S
'To SmR,
WITH
Shows at I1, 3, 5, 7, 9:10

#oe

;I

ENDS
TODAY

A DIES' DAY
us! Only 60c
d all Ladies
from 1 to 6 P.M.
9)

I

Starts
Thursday

4RM

Dial
8-6416

NATIONALEENEL GCORPORATIONOV O
FOX ASENTHE ATRES
FOH F LLMUE 2m ,s
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"769-1300 2 BIG HITS!
Petmr-oldwyn-Mayer presents A Judd Bernard-rin Winer Production
LEE MARVIN
"POINT BLANK"
h PANGIE DICKINSON
k In Pansvlsinand Metrocoor

PLUS.-

"THE MOST UNABASHED ART FILM EVER
TO COME OUT OF HOLLYWOOD! . .
the lushest visual effects ever seen in an above-
ground American movie. There hasn't been such
textural richness on the screen since the heyday
of Sternberg."
-L.A. Times
"ROGER CORMAN'S BEST PICTURE. A quite remark-
able film, striking and imaginative."
-Saturday Review
"A camera happening. Imaginative effects that knock
your eyes out."
-N.Y. Daily News
"it is ever groovy . . . THE TRIP is really a curious
and wildly imaginative work."
-Cleveland Plain Dealer
".. for the first time, Hollywood has tuned into the
vibrations-good and bad-humming hallucino-
genically throughout the sation."
-Playboy Mag.
.UCHN
TAT
P THE
'JAU~iEL ZLARKOFF
ARRING IN RGER CORMAN'SPCQ
r

1O ARE .
IG TO Great Films
)Y Encore !
E*
I u - IF E < " S U P E R IO R O F F -B E A T , A N D
.agazine ORIGINAL!"-N.Y. TIMES
ICHAEL CAINE
=COMMENDED FORY
MOUNT PICTURE-TECHNICOLORM
JS2U0EN 9TRE DINNCES
ISUGGESTED FODR MATURE AUDIENCES

Dial
NO 2-6264

=r-
M - -

3

DAILY
SHOWS

Thursday:

"THE TRIP"'

I

Y ,

NOW SHOWING

I

NEXT WEDNESDAY
AFTER "HELP"

Direct From It Roadehow Engagement. Every Ticket Holder Guaranteed A Seat
SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES - SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
SEATS RESERVED
--N. Y.DA/LY NEWS
STOTE
"STEVE McQUEEN A "D .
AT HIS BEST!" PE BLES
-N. K yIMES
AN ARGYLE-S0LAR PRODUCTIONS PICTURE
FILMED IN PANAVISION'.COLOR BY DELUXE
Coming NEXT: Paul Newman s "COOL HAND LUKE'
SUBSRIEE TO '!'E P(H1GAN DAILY

I

Mon.-Fri.: "POINT" 7:00-10:25; "NAKED" 8:40
"POINT" 1:05-4:35-8:05
SAT-SUN.: "NAKED" 2:40-6:15-9:45
STARTS WEDNESDAY
Glamour!...Speed!..Spectacle!

All the urgency and tension of the Award Winning play by Le Roi Jones is now on film!
NO ONE UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE WILL BE ADMITTED. -au.

Special Childrens
Mat. Sat. 12-2-4
Sun. 1 :30-3:30

*

:..:.:..:.:. .: .; .:.. ..... ........ ...... j .. .
AdCTDf1 ('!f11 Si lVhL6dAVCD __

I

I

' 'C ~l rIf/t I ~r .,..~. W -a-m .--"' . Vall under 18 years of age.-I

® II

i

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan