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November 02, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 196'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2,1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Opposition Asks
Ouster of Brown
British Secretary's Attack on Press
Arouses Conservative Objections

CONTINUING FEUD:
UAW Stops Financial Support
Prior to Break With AFLCIO

LONDON (P)-Demands of op-
position Conservatives for the dis-
missal of George Brown confront-
ed Britain's foreign secretary yes-
terday with the most serious crisis
of his political life.
The authoritative word is that,
for the next months at least,
Brown will continue as Britain's
foreign secretary.
Calls for Brown's ouster arose
after he administered a public
lashing to Canadian-born press
mnagnate Lord Thomson of Fleet
for allowing his British newspapers
to publicize the feats of Soviet
agent Kim Philby, who worked 30
years for Russian intelligence
while masquerading as a British
spy.
The spectacular incident at a
banquet attended by 70 American
businessmen and scores of report-
ers Tuesday night was only the
latest in a long series involving
Humphrey's
Malay Visit
Protested
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia ()
-Vice President Hubert H. Hum-
phrey flew from war-torn Vietnam
to normally tranquil Malaysia yes-
terday fr 'a three-day visit that
has touched off anti-American
demonst ations.
Apparently unknown to Hum-
phrey, his effigy was lynched by
a mob of leftist Chinese youths
in Penang City in the north.
Hundreds of demonstrators pa-
raded in Kuala Lumpur and in
some of the capital's suburbs with
banners in Malay, Chinese and
English reading: "Humphrey get
out."
Fire Tear Gas
No arrests were reported, though
police had to fire several rounds
of tear gas to disperse an unruly,
banner-waving group of 70 which
demonstrated near Humphrey's
motorcade route from the airport.
The demonstrations, however,
were on a much smaller scale
than the violent protests that
left one dead and several in-
jured during President Johnson's
21-hour visit here on his Southeast
Asian tour one year ago.
Deputy Prime Minister Tun Ab-
dul Razak welcomed Humphrey.
En route to the city they re-
peatedly heard explosions resemb-
firecrackers going off as Malaysia's
ling gunshots. But these were from
large Indian community celebrated
the Deepavali Festival of Lights.
Singapore Protests
Protests against Humphrey's
visit to Malaysia also broke out
in neighboring Singapore where
30 persons, shouting "go home
Humphrey;" threw sticks and
stones at police. Four were ar-
rested before the crowd dispersed.
Opposition to Humphrey's visit
has come primarily from the left-
wing Labor party, which charges
that the United States is trying
to involve Malaysia in the Vietnam
war.
Rahman said Tuesday, however,
Humphrey's visit is designed only
to see what help the United States
can give to. Malaysia's economy,
which has been badly hit the past
two months by a sharp drop in
the prices of natural rubber, its
major export.
The U.S. has no direct aid pro-
gram here, channeling all assist-
ance through the International
Aid Malaysia Club in Washington.

SERGEI EISENSTEIN,
FESTIVAL
Tonight & Tomorrow
ALEXANDER
NEVSKY
(1938)

53-year-old Brown. Some have
publicized. Others have been kept
dark.
What caused the new argument
was his remark that he thought
Thomson and his newspapers were
overdoing it.
"It is about time we stopped
giving the Russians half a start
on what we are doing. It is about!
time you shut up," Brown said.
Thomson was the host of the
banquet.
Later, Brown fought a 10-min-
ute hassle with reporters and this
elicited his charge that the British{
press is"the most prostituted press
in the world."
Thus far Prime Minister Harold
Wilson has displayed no inclina-
tion to bow before the cries of
Conservative politicians and news-
papers for him to fire Brown, who*
also is deputy prime minister.
Some of Brown's aides said he
had been provoked by Thomson's
dinner table talk and by Thom-
son's dinner table talk and by
Thomson's public joke about a
George Brown who had been ad-
vised 'to quit drinking.
Brown considers himself in a
state of political warfare with in-
fluential sections of Britain's
mainly Conservative press.
Brown said Tuesday night he
had broken of relations with the
British Press.
Brown displayed yesterday ab-
solutely no signs of a political or
any other sort of hangover even
as the storm about his future
raged around him.

-Associated Press
POLICE QUELL RIOT
Pittsburgh police stand guard on the grounds of the city's Oliver High School, where violence erupted
yesterday among the racially mixed students. Officers used a riot-control chemical to cool the long-
simmering friction, bringing protest from parents. Nine pupils were hurt.
Shortage of Funds May Close
Corn lutyaAction TProgr ams

WASHINGTON (,?)-Auto work-
ers president Walter Reuther is
burning his financial and political
bridges with the AFL-CIO in what
many sources view as final steps
toward walking his union out of
the nation's House of Labor.
The AFL-CIO's Industrial Un-1
ion Department, financed largely
by United Auto Workers' money,
is rapidly using up its fund. Reuth-
er's union has also quit giving
noney to the labor federation's
political arm, the Committee on
Political Education, sources said.
The money involved is substan-
tial, labor sources said, and strong-
ly indicates Reuther will climax
his long fight against AFL-CIO
President George Meany by pulling
his 1 Vf million auto workers out
of the 14-million member feder-
ation next month.
Confirm Spending
Jack Conway, executive director
of the Industrial Union Depart-
ment, confirmed that more than
$1 million has been spent out of
long-time cash reserves, but dis-
putes that it portends an auto
workers walkout.
Reuther's last remaining office
in the AFL-CIO is as president of
the Industrial Union Department.
He quit last February as an AFL-
CIO vice president and other posts
with a blast of criticism against
Meany's leadership.
Many labor leaders expect
Reuther to make the final break at
the AFL-CII convention in Miami
Beach in December.
Conway said the department
dipped heavily into its cash re-
serves to help other unions finance
organizing drives, but insisted "it's
nothing serious."
Net Worth
Other sources said the Industrial
Union Department's net worth
dropped from $2.3 million to $800,
000 in 10 months and that at the
present rate of spending, it could
run out of money in another eight
months.

speaks for the 129 AFL-CIO unions'
with one voice.
The auto workers in past years
participated heavily in AFL-CIO
political action.
Many labor sources said both
moves indicated Reuther, failing'
to win other unions' support in his
attack on Meany, is liquidating his,
financial interests in the AFL-CIO!
in preparation for a final break.
All sources agreed the Industrial
Union Department money is being
spent on organizing, anti-poverty
and other programs which organ-
ized labor considers worthwhile.
"It isn't as if he were spending
Dther peoples' money,' said one

World News Roundup

source, pointing out that the auto
workers have long contributed
more heavily than any of the other
59 unions in the Industrial Union
Department.
"It could mean that if Reuther
pulls out of the AFL-CIO. he
would leave the Industrial Union
Department empty-handed," an-
other source said.
"It was always there," Conway
said of the big cash reserve, until
the recent splurge of spending.
The money originally was a car-
ryover from the old CIO unions at
the time of its mergers with the
old American Federation of Labor,
he said.

WASHINGTON (i)-The anti-
poverty agency said yesterday
that 35 of its Community Action
programs affecting some 500,000
people may be forced to close this
month unless Congress votes soon
to continue funding the projects.
And if Congress continues after
Nov. 23 its inaction on a resolu-
tion permitting the Office of Eco-

Blaming Cities for Riotingj
'Miseoneeption' ayor Says

WASHINGTON (AP) - Mayor
Louie Welch of Houston, Tex., told
investigating senators yesterday
that blaming city government for
troubles that ignite racial rioting
is a misconception that can add to
Negro frustration and help produce
riots.
Welch said the idea that a may-
or's office can deal with all prob-
lems confronting a city "only leads
to rising expectations that cannot
be met." This he added, can itself
produce destructive outbreaks.
"With the federal government
setting so many policies and actu-
ally sponsoring commercials on
television aimed at helping minor-
ity groups, severe misconceptions
-an be passed on to these groups
as to who is repsonsible for what
at the local level," he said.
"People become easily frustrated
when they feel that they are being
given the runaround," Welch test-
ified as the Senate permanent in-
vestigations subcommittee opened
its inquiry into recent violence

that flared through some, Amer-
ican cities.
The mayor also said some fed-
eral officials seem totally unfam-
iliar with responsibilities of munic-
ipal government.
The panel's first step was tab-
ulating on a giant chart the results
of 101 disorders in 76 cities.
The subcommittee report listed
property damage in last summer's
Detroit riot at $144 million; that
in the Newark, N.J., rioting at
$10.2 million.
Welch said Houston is not free
of "the problems that seem to
contribute to rioting."
"Our very growth has only too
often outstripped our ability to
supply services and meet needs,"
he said.
Welch appealed for better fed-
eral understanding of the problems
of local government and said city
halls must, not be looked upon as
"the citadel of answers to all prob-
lems."

nomic Opportunity to continue fi-
nancing projects, another 100
Community Action programs will
be threatened in December.
Similar problems are facing
several other federal agencies
whose fiscal 1968 approprnations
also have not been passed. They
have been technically without
funds since expiration of a con-
tinuing resolution permitting them
to function on a temporary basis
until their money bills are ap-
proved.
Job Corps, Head Start
Other OEO projects affected by
congressional inaction include the
Job Corps and adult and youth
work training programs. Com-
munity Action programs include
Head Start, legal services, adult
basic education, foster grandpar-
ents and neighborhood centers.
Seven of the 35 Community
Action programs facing the pos-
sibility of being forced to close
down if not funded again by the
OEO by Nov. 23, could go out of:
business Friday.
OEO spending authority ex-
pired Oct. 23.
"The Community Action agen-
cies will have to use some local
device to continue to operate,"
said Don Wortman, associate di-
rector for operations for the
OEO's Community Action Pro-
gram.

He said a city government, a
charity fund or a bank might give
the local CAA a loan, but the
loan could not be guaranteed by
the federal government.
"With the lack of a continuing
resolution, we have no authority
to tell, them to make a loan,"
Wortman said. "The bank that
makes the loan will have to do it
on the faith - that the Congress
will appropriate the money."
Normally, about 75 local Com-
munity Action agencies of the
1,066 across the country would
come up for refunding during
November but about 40 have some
money left to carry them for a
while, he said.

By The Associated Press
BANGKOK-An official Soviet'
publication, for the second time in
recent months, strongly criticized
Communist China yesterday as
having ambitions to take over
neighboring countries in Southeast
Asia.
The article saidany visitor to
Southeast Asia would become
aware of a "feeling of anxiety"
over the policies of Chinese Com-
munist party Chairman Mao Tse-
tung.
WASHINGTON-The State De-
partment rejected as nonsense
yesterday a North Vietnamese
charge that the United States is
deliberately bombing North Viet-
namese Civilians and again called
on Hanoi to enter into peace talks.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The Senate
Foreign Relations Committee fail-
ed yesterday to reach agreement
on terms of a resolution intended
to restrain a president in using
U.S. military forces to defend
other countries.
Concern that approval of any

such a declaration would be inter-
preted at home and abroad as a
slap at President Johnson's Viet-
nam policies was a key factor in
the disagreement.
Sen. J. W. Fulbright, committee
chairman and sponsor of the orig-
inal resolution, told newsmen after
the closed session "it is very dif-
ficult to say whether there is a
sufficient sentiment at this time"
for committee approval.
WASHINGTON - FBI Director
J. Edgar Hoover, reacting to the
killing of two policemen during an
Illinois bank robbery, assailed
again yesterday what he called
maladministration of the nation's
parole systems.
Hoover also called for legislation
on the federal, state and local
levels to tighten up parole admin-
istration and added "The bleeding
hearts of this country have had
their say too long."
The 72-year-old director made
his unscheduled remarks at grad-
uation ceremonies for the 99 mem-
bers of the FBI National Academy,
a 12-week school for law enforce-
ment officers.

$28 Million
The 35 agencies in trouble rep- Conway confirmed that halting
resent approximately $28 million of auto workers contributions was
in refunding. largely responsible.
William B. Kelly, Job Corps It was confirmed too that the
director, said "Centers are living auto workers had also stopped its
off the shelf and some of our $150,000 a year voluntary contri-
conservation centers are very butions to the Committee on Polit-
limited. We're also living off the ical Education, which usually
largesse of our contractors." - - - -
He said the agency owes about
$2.75 million to contractors who
run the centers and who have
not been paid since Oct. 23. CINEM A II
The contractors, such as West-
inghouse, RCA and Science Re-
search Associates, buy goods and presents
materials for the centers, then
bill the OEO for reimbursement.
"n'I'

r
i

1

CHANCELLOR ROGER W. HEYNS
University of California at Berkeley
LEADERSHIP AND DECISION MAKING
IN THE MODERN UNIVERSITY
November 10, 1967, 8 p.m.
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
A Sesquicentennial Program of the Dept. of PsychologyI

GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE

vuu
Obsession"
(Kagi)
Winner, 1960 Cannes
Film Festival
FRIDAY, Nov. 3
SATURDAY, Nov. 4
7:00 & 9:15 P.M.
And. A, Angell Hall
50c

Friday, Nov. 3

Noon Luncheon, 25c

BY ASTRIKING AND ORIGINALTRAGICOMEDY
STUDS TERKEL
Brilliant Broadway Cast
Directed by MARCELLA CISNEY
Designed by ELDON ELDER

JOHN BISHOP
Chrm., Student Advisory Board to V.P. Cutler
Can Student Advisory
Boards Work"
Friday Evening 6 P.M.
International Dinner at Cost (Thailand)
LISTEN TO THAI MUSIC
For Reservations Call 662-5189
before 2 P.M. Friday

I

ghtatTHE ARK
1421 Hill Street
8:30 P.M.
DONALD BAGLEY (Community Organizer from De-
troit) speaking on: "THE DETROIT RIOT AND THE
EMERGING BLACK ATTITUDE," with his wife, Phil-
lis, singing folk and country blues, playing the guitar.
Friday and Saturday
CHRISTOPHER and SARA
returning by popular demand to sing contemporary
and ORIGINAL folk music.

0

U
A
C

.-. , j
:.

Ft^
S .-'

FOR
ACTORS
THIS YEARS PRODUCTION:

SWEET CHARITY

SWEET CHARITY

SWEET CHARITY

SWEET CHARITY

I

UNION BALLROOM

7:30 P.M.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5

11

I

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