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November 02, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-11-02

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I

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN, DAILY

TURSDAY, NOVE~MBER 2. 1987

RAGE TWO TIlE MICIIWAN DAILY

- -- -- 4-*- - I I - I --I- ---W , & OU I

MUSIC=

Records Reveal Ives'

Harmonic Complexity)

300 Sit In To Protest
'U Classified Research
Continued from Page 1) eluding Smith, lined the first-
sified research contracts are re- floor corridor, discussing possible
jected." Rapoport delivered what techniques involved in removing
Norman termed "an eloquent ad- iclassified research from the Uni-
dress." classing classified research versity, while those upstairs failed
"a denial of knowledge in an in-I to confront President Hatcher,
stitution devoted to enlighten- :who was in New York yesterday.

By R. A. PERRY
Charles Ives' "Quartet No. 1"
pleasingly blends late Beethoven
with rustic Dvorak. Complex
enough to provide repeated listen-
ing involvement and surprise, the
work is lyrical enough to please
the less intellectually demanding
musical desires. Ives' Second Quar-
tet, however, is a totally different
affair; it gropes its way relentlessly
through that non-cartesian world
of atonality, and offers the barest
lyrical centers of gravity upon
which the mind can fall back.
Ives wrote, in "Essays Before a
Sonata," that "beauty in music is
too often confused with something
that lets the ears lie back in an
easy chair." Indeed, musicologists
are slowly perceiving, in awe, what
an isolated originator Ives was.
His "Second Quartet," for example,
was written in the same year; 1907,
that Schoenberg published the
first completely atonal piece of

music, his "Opus 10 Quartet."
A few years ago, the Kohon
String Quartet of N.Y.U. gave both
works their premiere recording on
the Vox label. Perhaps because
these performances had severe lim-
itations-the primary being a pro-
pensity to muddle rather than ex-
plicate Ives' harmonic complexities
-the works were not seized and
included in quartet repertoire. A
new recording by the prestigious
Juilliard Quartet, issued this
month by Columbia, should reme-
dy the situation.
In matters of technique, co-
hesion of voices, and solidarity of
intent, the Juilliard are simply
perfect. They may not be every-
one's choice for Schubert or Mo-
zart, but in the modern repertoire
they are unexcelled.
In the Ives "First Quartet," the
Kohon's unfinished quality en-
hances Dvorakian elements in a
way that the slightly clinical Juil-

Non-Violent Mood Prevails
At Military Research Sit-in

liard can not; also the quicker
tempo of the first movement taken
by the Kohon group both conveysI
the dance spirit and provides con-
trast to later slower tempos in a
more successful manner than the
Juilliard achieve. In every other
aspect, however, the Juilliard ex-
cell, and they are never, as the
Kohon so often are, overcome by
the problems that the music pre-
sents. Columbia's recorded sound is
infinitely clearer and less distorted,
than Vox's.
A truly beautiful performancej
of Berlioz's "Symphonie Fantasti-
que" can be found in Seiji Ozawa's
reading with the Toronto Sym-
phony. In this work usually over-
played for its every coloristic de-
tail, the young Ozawa opts for a
restrained classicism. Limiting the
espressive range, he manages to
effect a plasticity of line that
eschews drama for its own sake.
The second movement waltz, for
instance, is lithesome, not giddy
nor glittering. The Toronto Sym-
phony responds in a wholly pro-
fessional manner, and the rec-
orded orchestral sound is, for Co-
lumbia,'remarkably transparent.
Chamber music enthusiasts will
find an extraordinary bargain in
Odyssey's reisue of Mozart's "Piano
Quartets" as.played by the Buda-
pest Quartet with George Szell at
the piano. Szell's piano playing is
in many ways as facile and "per-
fect" as his conducting; that is, it
lacks an explorative, involved,
plastic, deep communication with
the spontaneous development of
the music. He sounds like he is
playing music found rather than
like he is finding music. This is
quibbling, perhaps, for few artistsj
(Toscanini, Casals, Schnabel, Fer-
rier) can achieve such a desirable
"Einfuhlin."
Though Schnabel and the Pro
Arte give the most communicative
performance of K. 478, the Szell/
Budapest find a splendid balance
between the surface grace and theE

meditative level in both K. 478
and K. 493. Recorded in 1946, the
sound is warm and resonant, lack-
ing the end-groove distortion
found on many of today's press-
ings. Furthermore, the Budapest
were then in their most mellow
years.
Carl Orff's "Catulli Carmina" at
first sounds vivacious and stimu-
lating, but soon the enthusiasm
appears premeditated and the ef-
fects ar'e incredibly repetitious. In
a manner nearly identical to his
earlier "Carmina Burana," Orff
has set mildly salacious poems of
Catullus to music for tenor, sopra-
no, and chorus.
If you own a copy of "Carmina
Burana," it should suffice, but if
you are a true fan of this "sui
generis" composer, you will be
pleased to know that Eugene Or-
mandy and the Temple University
Chorus give forth the verbal eja-
culations in an appropriately pun-
gent style.
CORRECTION
A story appearing in yester-
day's Daily inaccurately re-
ported the size of sites pres-
ently being considered by Ann
Arbor's Human Relations Com-
mission for use in the city's
public housing program. The
number of families to be housed
in each site has not yet been
determined, contrary to the
story which stated that 15-40
families would be housed in
each.
In addition, the acreage
presently under consideration
does not total 20 acres as re-
ported, but includes several
sites ranging in size from two
to almost 20 acres each. A
$27,000 survey of the need for
public housing reported com-
pleted is actually still only a
proposal.

ment."

Besides calling for an end to all

Prof. Max Heirich of the sociol- classifed.researcn, te handful 0f
ogy department and Prof. Nicholas demonstrators still remaining at
Kazarinoff of the mathematics de- the end of the sit-in called for the
partment backed up Rapoport's establishment of a faculty-student
assertions. comittee to determine the future
Profsso Emeitu Wiliam status of Willow Run Labs and to
SProfessor Emeritus William G. investigate broad guidelines for
Dow, retired chairman of the elec- University research and policy
trical engineering department, said
he was "proud of the role I've had
in strengthening our country" by
acepting classified contracts, and
that "we've thereby aided the mil- UNIVERSITY OF MICE'
itary establishment in doing some-
thing good." DEPARTMENT OF S
Th'e demonstrators then divided
into three groups, occupying the
first floor and ante-room leading present
into the offices of Norman and
Smith, the corridor leading into
President Harlan Hatcher's office.
and one sector of the main lobby.
"I think it was a great tactical
mistake breaking up the whole SER JEANT I
meeting just when things were I I I
getting interesting," Norman said.
Another 100 demonstrators, in-

f
t
t
a

MISSISSIPPI BLUES SINGER-
SKIP JAMES
Just returned from European tour
APPEARING THIS WEEKEND at the
eJPTENBUN Y i~OUgE
Friday, Saturday, Sunday
8 P.M.-$1.50-after 2nd set--$1.00
SKIP JAMES, food, tables, chairs, low light ...

IIAN PLAYERS
WEE CII

MUSGRAVE'S
DANCE
t. nov.1-4

*1

(Continued from Page 1)
were willing to settle for just
an end to classified projects and
a tripartite review of research
policy.
Still others were concerned
only with the Thailand project
itself, while some undoubtedly
came only to listen to other
peoples' views.
While several demonstrators
seemed to relish the very remote
possibility of a confrontation with
club swinging police and while
others were talking about an "as-
sault" on Willow Run Labora-
tories in Ypsilanti, most people
seemed sufficiently unsure of
their positions on specifics to be
willing to merely talk about the
situation.
Furthermore, the predisposition
towards violence that has been
observed in radicals in Washing-,

ton and in Oakland, Calif., was
notably lacking at yesterday's sit-
in. This was demonstrated when
the protesters voted by an over-
whelming margin not to use any
sort of disruptive tactics.
An overview of the afternoon's
events yields testimony to the
stature - or lack thereof - of
classified research as volatile
campus issue. Unlike the ques-
tions of student conduct rules-
making and the military draft,
both of which elicited far more
enthusiastic campus response,
classified research has no per-
sonal impact on the vast majority
of students.
In fact, at the meeting's end,
only 25 stragglers remained to de-
bate the technicalities of a press
release.
At 7:30 p.m., the janitors came
in to sweep the floor.

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