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October 29, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-29

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHI

.... . . __

music

GAIN DAILY
The Week To Come: a Campus

Bernstein Shines in Mahlier Re

nr n c

° By'JAMES SVEJDA
For the benefit of anyone whot
may- not.'yet know what all the!
excitement is about, Gustav Mah-
ler, the :bohemian 'composer -con-'
ductor whose work was slighted"
ard unappreciated at the turn of
the century, is currently the hot-
test-selling' composer in the clas-.
sical catalogue.
An extremely complex man and
musician,. he produced nine.sym-
phbnies (eleyn, if you countl
"Das Lied, vonider Erde" and the
zecentlY reonstriucted Tenth)
that in some circles are being
talked of as the last of the great
Austro-German symphonies.
To explain Mahler's relevance
today is more properly a job for
the culturologist than the music
critic. Grossly oversimplified,
there is something in his gro-
tesque,. htense; "neurotic, alter-I

nately revolting, and beautiful
symphonies that is peculiarly In-
digenous to- the twentieth cen-
tury.E
This month, Columbia Records
-has' issued the first conplete re-
cording of the Nine Symphonies
of Gustav Mahler with Leonard
Bernstein conducting the New
York Philharmonic and the Lon-
don Symphony. Whether or not,
this will eventually become as
common a practice as issuing
cdmplete ' Beethoven sets is dif-I
ficult to say.- Klemperer, Solti
and Leinsdorf -have -each begun a
series that is well on its way to
completion.
With all due respect to theser
gentlemen and the other conduc-
tors who are recording Mahler
symphonies, another complete set
no longer seems necessary. For
Leonard Bernstein, whose talentsC

-c-inema.
-
bles':WPlot,
Bloo-andGutsBattles'
By NEIL BARRY SHISTER same - except McQueen, Who,
Me and maybe 500 high school# tells the kid to wash his.
kids: spent- yesterday- afternoon McQueen himself is an inter-
watching "The Sand . Pebbles" esting actor. A top contender in
anid TIsuppose neither them. nor I Hollywood's attempt to turn out.
e that .much theworse for.hav-j a resident stud to succeed Bo-
ingiseenit, although by the end gad, he is up. there with Brando,
I ..was .pretty impatient for the. Paul Newman and johnny-come-
lat guy to. get killed so. fcould lately Warren Beatty. His forte.
leave. .seems to be the lost look coupled
with a tough grimace and the evil
This is the kind of movie Hol- eye. He delivers his lines with a
lywood does superbly. There is a minimum of effort, his emotionsI
string of 'about seven fiftgen min- running the narrov gamut from
ute blood-and-ut action se- unconcerned to downright bas-
quences> strung, .. together . withunocre todwigtbs
enough plot-line so that when the tard. At least Newman is good
_ tension. from one of the. fights for a crying scene (hand thrust
subsifdes theire . is an excuse for up to his forehead in an agony of
g e ..the universe pose) once-a-picture.
McQueen is the last man to go
Teptdoesntean hin "thepicture, dying 'death
The ,anPedro..is-a .gun-boat in'erienuhtsuthebg
the American navy which is try- money men who backed this
g to sinleanded ke thing and just sufficiently ironic
'China. from.. freeing itself from"s ta h.'riss h, aa
the iestern natios,. especially hand in it 'won't feel they com-
en ite. s,.wch rpletely copped-out. You sort of
expect him to rise from the
Steve McQueenls the goodguy ground on one elbow and ask the
on board, a-tough-break kid, from' camera, "hey- man, what hap-
Utah who. got kicked out of -high pened' here?"
school and joined- the ;navy. By Candy: Bergen is the woman.
the time one gets into the picture -She is a fine looking girl, but ev-
you feel pretty 'much for . Mc- ery time 'she opens her mouth you
Queen- since he 'seems to realize, sort of think one of her old man's
unllike the' captain Or 'the rest of ventriloquist dummies would be
the, men on-ship; that the natives more .interesting. -Here she is in
should be running their own lives. the middle of China, about to be
There is an especially"good spot killed or raped or both, and she's
where McQueen is with a landing still smiling like a- high-school
party who have just had their hot-shot about to go out on her
uniforms abused by the Chinese, first" date with a boy who can
being splattered with garbage drive at night.
and tomatoes. In a line to warm It is worthwhile noting that
the heart of Barry Goldwater, this picture, when it was first
one of the men tells the coolie released, was one of the contend-
cabin boy to burn his soiled uni- ers for the Academy Award as
form, he never wants to see it the year's best picture. It didn't
again. The others chime in the win, but not because it didn't try.
'TO SIR, WITH LOVE' IS ENTERTAINMENT OF.
THE WARMEST'SORT, SO RIGHT THAT YOU
WOULD STAND UP AND CHEER!"
Archer Winsten, New York Post

are uniquely suited to this music,;
has come up with one of the truly
great recordings of all time.
This is not to say that Bern-
stein has the last word every-I
where. In the early symphonies,
he does . face some formidable
competition. As a case in point,;
there is Bruno Walter's record-3
ing of the Fourth, now available
on the Odyssey label. Despite the
somewhat antique recorded sound1
and a lack of absolute control
over the tempo changes in the
3rd movement, this is still a mar-
velous performance. And here,
the Bernstein version itself falls
short on several counts.
Later Symphonies
But it is in the great later sym-
phonies that Bernstein becomes
all but unbeatable.
His Fifth is a knock-out. No-
where else is the bleak tragedy of
the Funeral Music so painfully
evoked. And in no other recording
that I have ever heard does the
bright Rondo-Finale's joyousness
come across quite as convincingly.
And so with the Sixth. The
tragedy, which here pervades the
entire work, almost becomes un-
bearable. Bernstein's eery, for-
bidding beginning of the finale is
a spine-tingler. Similarly, the
maniacal Scherzo is done with3
such an - utter and frightening
sense of control that it almost
makes the skin crawl.
Notoriety
Bernstein's performance of the
Seventh, the most unfamiliar of
all Mahler's symphonies, has re-
ceived some considerable notor-
iety on its own. And justly so. The
last movement, which strikes so
many listeners as being some-
thing of an afterthought here, at
last, sounds like a finale.
If you have a lease to break, I
suggest you try Bernstein's re-
cording of the Eighth. With eight -
soloists, five choruses and an
DIAL 8-6416

UM.1 [onday, Oct. 30 Ludwig, Mezzo-soprano at Hill atre Program will present G. B.
4:10 p-m.-The Department of Auditorium. Shaw's "The Village Wooing" at
augmented London Symphony History of Art will present a lec- Wednesday, Nov. 1 the Arena Theatre, Frieze Build-
complete with mandolin, harmon- Lure on "The Fate of Italian Li- 4:10 p.m.-The Department of ing.
ium and organ, this work almost braries and Archives in the Re- Speech Student Laboratory The- 7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
literally becomes "The Symphony cent Flood" given by Roberto Ab- atre Program will present G. B. will present Sergei Eisentein's
of a Thousand." bondanza in Aud. B. Shaw's "The Village Wooing" at "Alexander Nevsky" at the Archi-
The second movement, one of 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.-The Uni- the Arena Theatre, Frieze Build- tecture Auditorium,
the greatest in all music, is ab- versity Extension Service and the ing. 8 p.m.-The Department of
solutely overwhelming in this Michigan State University Even- 7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild Speech University Players will
performance. Bernstein's control ing College will present Prof. will present Sergei Eisentein's present John Arden's "Serjeant
is again unerring. Listen to the Marvin Felheim speaking on "Is "Old and New" at the Architec- Musgrave's Dance" at Trueblood
contrast between the ineffably Contemporary Fiction W o r t h tur Auditorium. Theatre.
sensitive choral entrance in the Reading?" at the Rackham Am- 8 p.m.--The Department of 8 p.m.-The Professional The-
"Chorus Mysticus" after the ten- phitheatre. Speech University Players will atre Program will present Eugene
or solo, and the shattering impact 8:30 p.m..-The School of Music present John Arden's "Serjeant Ionesco's "Exit the King" at the
that the same figure has a few will present the University Phil- Musgrave's Dance" at Trueblood Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
bars later. harmonia, Theo Alcantara, Con- Theatre.
ductor, and Elizabeth Mannion, 8 p.m.-The Professional The- Friday, Nov. 3
Poignant Performance Mezzo-soprano, at Hill Audi- atre Program will present Eugene 7 and 9:05 p.m.--Cinema Guild
The Ninth Symphony, which torium. Ionesco's "Exit the King" at the will present Sergei Eisenstein's
along with "Das Lied von der 8:30 p.m.-The University Mu- Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, "Alexander Nevsky" at the Archi-
Erde" constitutes Mahler's great 1'sical Society will present the Ber- Thursday, Nov. 2 tecture Auditorium.
"farewell", receives a poignant, lin Philharmonic Octet at Rack- 4:10 p.m.-The Departiiment of 8 p.m.--The Department of As-
moving performance and provides ham Auditorium. History will present Sister Dolor- tronomy Visitor's Night presents
an appropriate conclusion to the Tuesday, Oct. 31 osa Kennelly, College of St. Cath- Richard Bochonko, speaking on'
set. erine, Minn-, to speak on "The "Novae", in Aud. D.
Th oo drwback i 8 p.m.-The Professional The- Peace Movement in Medieval 8 p.m.-The Department of,
volved with this release is atre Program will present Eugene Catalonia" in room 110, Physics- Speech University Players will
pr, whichat listise-hun Ionesco's "Exit the King" and the Astronomy Building, present John Arden's "Serjeant
dre doll atr. i t, is one un-eh Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. 4:10 p.m.-The Department of Musgrave's Dance" at' Trueblood
be managed and you are inter- 8:30 p.m.-The University Mu Speech Student Laboratory The- Theatre.
ested in becoming familiar with sical Society will present Christa - - -
some wonderful music, or simply
want to hear some of the great-
est performances ever recorded fr- s
by anyone, this historic release 0w 0 E aUement
should fit the bill quite ade- SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES A
quately. __ SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
Phoe-434-013O MATINEES 1_:20 - 4:50
EVENINGS 8:20
NO SEATS RESERVED EXTENDS TO YOU AN INVITATION
EveryTicketHolderGuaranteedA Seat TO THE FINEST MUSICAL SHOW E\
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FREE HEATERS
"FRANK AND
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-Redbook Magazine PEBBLESE
The BOULTING BROTHERSProduction
I Er eoat ' ,RETURNING FROM A 10-N
STEVE MCQDEEIFAR EAST TOUR
nYoMrI SJOISIYLs EIrrRICARATEE RA Hill Auditorium 8:00 p.m.
CANDICE BER AIE YATANDRANE Tickets $1.00
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ECHNiCQOR. FRsMWANERBReon.E-T H I S SHOW WI LL ONLY BE PRESE
with ROD TAYLOR NO 2-6264
NO2-26 iMUSCK ET wi IIn iionr res,

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1967
Calendar
8 p.m.--The Professional The-
atre Program will present Eugene
Tonesco's "Exit the King" at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Saturday, Nov. 4
1:30 p..-The Michigan elev-
en will meet Northwestern at
Michigan Stadium.
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will present Sergei Eisenstein's
"The Battleship Potemkin" at the
Architecture Auditorium.
7 and 9:30--The School of Mu-
sic will present the University
Men's Glee Club and the Ohio
Sttae University Men's Glee Club
at Hill Auditorium.
8 pm.--The Department of
Speech University Players will
present John Arden's "SerJeant
Musgrave's Dance" at Trueblood
Theatre.
8 p.m.-The Professional The-
atre Program will present Eugene
Ionesco's "Exit the King" at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Sunday, Nov. 5
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will present Sergei Eisenstein's
"The Battleship Potemkin" at
the Architecture Auditorium.

T
/ER

I

U.S.A.

WEEK

I

Wed., Nov.1

DX Office

ENTED ONCE !
nsibility

___
,.

UAC - CINEMA!I
presents
HALLOWEEN
MOVIES
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's
"A STUDY IN TERROR"
plus
"DEVILS OF DARKNESS"
plus
Chapt, 7: FLASH GORDON

for the disappointment of those
who miss it

CINEMASCOPE 6
Color by TECHNICOLOR
-COMING -2 DAYS ONLY-
Tuesday and Wednesday
"MADAM BUTTERFLY"

11

Door Prizes
No Admission
Charge

I

Tues., Oct. 31
8:00 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM

"SURERBI
WARM,
M OVING,
AND
HMOROUS!"
'-Wanda Hale,
New York Daily News

SIDNEY.
POITIER
nJAMES CLAVELL'S
'To Sig,
WITH
LOVE'
'Shows at, 3, 5,7, 9:10

FINAL APA WEEK!

"MAGNIFICANCE!"-Detroit News "BRILLIANCE!"--Detroit Free Press

NATiONAL 6ENERAL COi~PORATiON

6th
and
FINAL
WEEK

FOX EASTERN THEATRES G
FOXVILLR6E
37 NoAPLE0RD.-769.1300

Feature Times
Monday - Friday
8:30 p.m.. only
Saturday - Sunday
2 - 5:10 - 8:30 p.m.

4
I

I

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-MCOMING SOON

r~emvivn-Mayer presents Audd Bmad-in~nlderPrduiionw

r-'LEE MARVINl

in the AMERICAN PREMIERE of

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