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October 26, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-26

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TOTE MICHIG&N fDAILY

'1 UYTR Q" A V nVVAUVIP ha 4 ec«I

a ... s "i' H U'1Z..*l L.

PAY, Vl:lVtSr;tt'~!,6, 1967

t

poetry and prose-
New American Review: Exciting, Various

Across

By MARVIN FELHEIM
Professor of English
"The New American Review,"
t(New York, 1967, No. 1, 95 cents)
resumes after a lapse of some
years where "New World Writing"
(1952-1959) left off. Like its
predecessor, the Review is a dis-
tinguished collection (its format,
too, .is that of a paper-boundI
book) of stories, essays and verse.
Its editor, Theodore Solotaroff,
'53, has enunciated a principle of
catholicity of taste (which he ap-
propriately labels "hospitality")
which has guided the selection of
materials for the new venture
and has been responsible for its
variety and, I believe, its quality.
For this issue is good; it is ex-
citing; it is various.
The .pieces which first attracted
me were the essays: the range of
topics which they coverrand the
high quality of the, prose, the
style, in which they are written-
these are their most significant
attributes.
Subject matter is all inclusive:
Stanley Kauffmann's most inter-
esting account of his stint as
Drama Critic for the New York
Times (he will be the regular film
critic for NAR) and Richard Gil-
man's provocative discussion of
"MacBird!" - both pieces are,
most informative - establish a
high-level of honesty and percep-
tion; these arenreasonable, but
persuasive, examples of argumen-
tation.
Neither essayist blurs; each
goes to the very heart and bones
of the issues raised. Benjamin De
Mott and George Dennison con-
front. complex and controversial
problems - homosexuality in the
arts, the sense of "urgency" in
the works and in the "legend" of
Genet - with clarity and insight;
they do not oversimplify the con-
cerns, yet they isolate the essen-
tial ethical values and the social
considerations.
I especially appreciated Theo-
dore Roszak's penetrating obser-

vations about the academy and Delicacy and precision seem to
its professionals. He reminds us me the essentials.
in the universities, in words that I liked especially John Okai's
are loaded without being over- "The African" (somewhat differ-
charged, of our "political" re- ent and strong), Anne Sexton's
sponsibilities, our heritage of com- "The Touch" (with its fine cli-
mitment and the possibilities of max) and Sister Madeline De
a dangerous loss of our only Frees' "An Elegy for God and the
meaningful tradition (that of:Widow Damascus" (the sharp,
"humanitarian meddling") if we'exact descriptive phrases).
fail to assume our proper role of Stanley Moss is the poetry edi-]
"citizenly service." tor. Now that he has established4
His is a timely reminder from I such a genuinely high standard,
inside; he writes with the author- perhaps he will welcome some(
ity of history and he conveys the even stranger voices, some more1
urgent sense of our immediate ;experimental styles. I trust, too,
situation. } that from his favored position he
will be able to tell us about thea
I seem to be prose bound. The j view.
poems are short (and, therefore, 1 Finally and gloriously there is
somewhat more available); there the fiction. Two special stories
are many of them in the Review make this first issue of NAR a
(19 by 14 poets); the voices range real collector's item. The first is
from the well known - Robert, Philip Roth's "The Jewish Blues".
Graves, Richard Eberhart, Anne Roth has a real talent for short(
Sexton et al. - to the newer fiction (demonstrated in "Good-(
sounds of Helen Chasin and bye, Columbus") and has shown a(
Louise Gluck and the more exotic certain awkwardness in his ex-
rhythms of John Okai from periences with the long novel. t
Ghana and the distinguished This story catches in its web
Russian, Anna Akhmatova, who several themes: the growing boy,
died in 1966. the Jewish home and its senti-
All the poems are lyrics; none mental partisanship, the pain
of them is particularly difficult; and the ecstasy of aloneness and1
forms are more or less conven- togetherness, the overpowering
tional. These poets are observers parents and the precisely terrible
and remarkers; as poets have al- as well as uniquely special trial of
ways done, they see, feel, relate.; one individual, adolescent boy.

The other story is more flam-
boyant. The first published short
work by William Mathes (his first The University's MUSKET tour
novel has also just been issued),
"Swan Feast" is a macabre ac- will return to campus Oct. 30 and
count of a hunting trip (from not today, as printed in yester-
Faulkner's "The Bear" to Nor- day's Daily. The group will per-
man Mailer's recent "Why Are form in Hill Auditorium on
We in Vietnam?,. Nov 1
Like Roth's, this is a first- *
person narrative, but more imme-
diately dramatic. A tour de force, The annual Second Congres-
the story builds to a violent but sEional DcCar at which Sen.
expected climax, filled with wan- ugene y wi appear,
ton destruction. The swans them- wion ins ead i une chgearn
selves, as they have for Eudora .
Welty and Kay Boyle, serve as it has been in the past and was
brilliant symbols, but here they reported in yesterday s Daily. The
are plundered; their beauty be- date for the dinner is Nov. 10.
comes part of the wonder of this
symbolically contrived story, so The Ann Arbor Civic Ballet will
directly, so explicitly, so power- perform together with the Toledo
fully told. Ballet in the opening concert of'
The publication of Mathes and I the Toledo Ballet Association's
of other "firsts" (Victor Kolpa- 1967-68 season on Sunday, Oct.
coff, Norman Martien) as well as 29 at Mary Manse College in To-!
of other young writers is a praise- ledo. The two groups will present
worthy feature of NAR. The prac- "Les Sylphides," "Graduation
tice augurs well for the next is- Ball," the "Pas de Quatre" from
sue which, one insider tells me, "Grape Festival" and the "Gayne
will be even better. Ballet Suite."

CINEMA II
presents
FEDERICO FELLINI'S
LA STRADA
ANTHONY QUINN
GIULIETTA MASINA
SHORT: Chapter 6
Flash Gordon
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