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October 24, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-24

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN ?VATT.V

vimvT ar

VAGETWO HE MCH~t&N UAE__

T UEI

DAY, 4

poetry and prose

music

i

IO 4: 'Logic'

of Alchemy

Buff

'Adorable' But

This Week's Events
TUESDAY, OCT. 2 "The Structure and Evolution of
8 p.m. -The Professional Thea-. the Sun." To observe : A Star
tre Program will present George Cluster and a Double Star at Aud.
Kelly's "The Show-Off" in the FD.

ANDREW M. LUGG abstract mathematics and topo-
Some "little" magazines start logy."
out with a great flourish but never However incomplete this list
get beyond two or three issues. might seem to be, it presents a
Contributors lose interest. and in considerable body of subject mat-
the 'ensuing desperate attempt to ;ter for study. 10 4 covers most of
obtain. copy, the point of view these topics systematically and
of the magazine gets lost. Others in depth. I use the word "systema-
(fewer in number to be sure) im- tically" advisedly because this is
just what sets Grossinger apart
prove with each issue.. from the crypto-alchemists to be
Richard Grossinger and Lindy found in, for example, the San
Hough Grossinger's "10," produced Francisco "Oracle."
here- in. Ann -Arbor, falls into the "h Tbtr oko h ed,
second category; 10 has developed The 'Tibetan Book of the Dead'
from- being 'a collection of poems is, finally, a map of the world of
and essays chosen because they the dead, not of a drug-trance,"
deal with particular themes-al- says Grossinger, underlining the
chemy cosmology, Western mys- difference between his approach
ticism and the occult, anthropolgy and that of the hippies.
(the American Indian) and folk- Behind all the essays in the
.ore-to be a detailed study of the magazine we find a concern with
themes themselves. a number of topics: time, love, the
The newest issue, 10 4 is de- effect of the cosmos on the in-
voted to alchemy., In his intro- dividual, dreams and the "pysche."
duction Ricard Grossinger spells Robert Kelly's brilliant "An Al-
out the traditions that he includes chemical Journal" considers some
under the name "Alchemy": "The of these topics.
tradition of ancient wisdom from It works on a number of levels.
Egypt and pre-Egypt; the phil- One section reads: "Silence is in-{
osophy of matter in the ancient struction. Al and Carola had a
world . . . all forms of Platonism; long way to drive. Overweening
the spiritual magic of Hebrew and Oracles. Aaufrages, Simplicitty. I
Christian occult documents. I remember a story. Why I was
Also included are: the prechem- there. Why the sun shone. They
istry and prepharmacy of the had a long way to go. Presence
Western World; Hindu and Bud- fills her. Her body turns over,
dhist theories of creation and sus- she sees me watching her."
tenance; Aterican Indian cere- The logic works in a manner
monial medicine and rain magic; that we are fast losing the knack,
shamanistic study of dreams and f appreciating, namely that A dic-
visions . . . (unidentified flying tates B, C, D, E . . . not just B.
objects) . . the cosmology of Transformations are not one-to-

Rental Union Handles
Apartment Complaints

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(Continued from Page 1)
things happened in 1966, and itI
was not under my control," he
says.
One girl accused another agency
of failing to install a phone cable,
a stove, or, for that matter, any
furniture at all (except beds) for
the first month. The agency's
spokesman says this is "not true,
at all, The phone cable is the
phone company's responsibility,
and has nothing to do with us."
He points out that this apartment
was in a "brand new building,"
and that the time taken for the
furniture to arrive "wasn't any--
where near that long. .The stove
was in in three days."
The small landlords, too, are'
blamed. One of them allegedly
evicted a girl in order to house
her daughter who was returning
home. The girl had not signed a
lease, nor had she ever met her
landlady, whose relatives had
leased out the apartment while
the landlady was abroad. The
landlady says, however, that the
tenant had paid no rent and that
her friends living there were "re-
cently arrested for dope-push-
ing."
Boycott Planned
A girl who has now moved back
into Alice Lloyd Hall claims she
had a landlady who used to leave
notes- around the apartment cri-
ticizing her (the girl's) messi-
ness. When the girl asked that
the snow be cleared from the
steps, she reports getting a note
from her landlady saying, "Tell
the mailman to keep the mail un-

til the snow thaws."
The landlady says, "I deny
everything," adding that this girl
was "the worst tenant I ever
had." The snow wasn't cleared,
she says because "it was so bad
that it eventually had to be chop-
ped off."
And one landlord has had no
complaints filed against him and
even one note calling him "a
really great landlord."
Overall, the town with the rent'
average closest to Ann Arbor's is
Berkeley, Calif., where' there are
eight-month leases, and here,.
SRU's Schreiber plans a selective
boycott of major agencies in gen-
eral protest of the student rental
problem. He hopes the boycott
will engender eight-month leases.
SRU also plans to publish a rec-
commended list of landlords, then
select "several irresponsible and
uncooperative landlords and stick
them with a loss." Schreiber add-
ed that there is already a five to
ten per cent vacancy rate in Ann
Arbor housing which makes a
boycott feasible.
He calls his proposed boycott
"a symbolic and real act of stu-
dent consumer pressure."
Phone 434-0190
E£t ce On CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 6:30 P.M.
FREE HEATERS

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4
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one, they are constructed poly-
morphically.
Likewise, or conversely, a myriad
of things suggests a unity: "I'll
say this for IBM: from them we
may one day relearn that there
is no number but one, no repose
but zero."
Kelly has no difficulty in deal-
ing with anything and everything.
Any detail or event is to be syn-
thesized- looked at as the whole
-and broken down into smaller
events-looked at as a set of
elements. ("All things are finally
brought into the Furnace of Love.
We have that assurance. The
temperature" or "the beautiful
thing about time there is no mis-
taking it. No mistake in it.")
Richard Grossinger's autobio-
graphical essay from his "Solar
Journal" is also blessed by the
"polymorphic" approach. The nar-
rative moves along subtly blend-
ing the common-place with the
universial ("We can only observe
the connections.") Geographical
'states (Michigan, Ohio, etc.) are
treated as states of mind, but
also in their concreteness - where
events happen.
Dreams are seen as preceeding
actual events as well as. coming
after them. Connections abound.
Implied is a superstructure that
includes the Coca-Cola bottle with
the rituals of the Snake People
in West Virginia. America, of
course, is the most diverse and yet
the most single-minded of coun-
tries.
There are a number of other
modern "alchemical" essays in IO
4, including two by Jorge Borges
and extracts from two lectures on
UFOs by Mel Noel. Three ac-
counts of Anlerican Indian myths
translated in the nineteenth cen-
tury are included and source ma-
terial from the heyday of alchemy,
the 13-15th centuries, has been
especially translated for this is-
sue.
This latter emphasizes just how
divorced the sciences and the
humanities have become with our
present-day notions of causality
and isomorphic relationships and
with Freud and Co.'s thermodyn-
amical description of the pysche.
But maybe this is changing.
Grossinger suggests that "there is
a conection between astrological
and alchemical works and the
work of quantum physics." Mel
Dropkin in his essay "Mathematics
Article" connects the cosmos and
dreams with abstract algebra in
a way (necessarily but unfortun-
ately) that is not for the uniniti-
ated.
IO 4, which is more of a book
than a magazine, is one of the
richest and most stimulating col-
lection of essays that I have read
for a long time. I have in no-
way covered the material pre.
sented there but I hope to have
implied that this issue is an ex-
tremely competent study which
reveals the subtleties of the sub-
ject.
6th "ATIONAL GENERAL CO
thOX EASTERN THEATR
AN D 3 a m in

Ramsey 'Horrible'

By JOHN MILLER
You believed her, you liked her,
you wanted to take care of her,
and you wanted her to take care
of you. You don't like Buffy
Sainte-Marie cause she sings well,
or cause she writes well, or even
because her hair is worthy of wor-
ship. She's adorable, a little
woman, a little girl, a little do-
mestic, and a tiny bit nervous.
Nobody really cared what the
first tune was on account of her
medieval - gothic - leprechaun -
leotard - tennis - Esmeralda -

will present the University Wood-
start until after eleven or you Wind Qiuntet in concert in Rack-
weren't quite sure if your blind ham Lecture Hall.
date saw through Ramsey. Or WEDNESDAY, OCT. 25
maybe you were being destroyed 4:10 p.m.--The Department of
by "Intimate" on one side and Speech Student Laboratory Thea-
"Shalimar" on the other. tre Program will present G. B.
When Ramsey announced that Shaw's "Poison, Passion, and Pet-
the next tune they were going to rifaction" in the Arena Theatre
play hadn't really been rehearsed, of the Frieze Building.
I was looking forward to it cause 4:15 p.m.--As part of the Wil-
the rehearsed ones were terrible. Liam W. Cook Lectures on Amer-
And to and behold they played ican Institutions-"The Govern-
"In Crowd." If you are doing a ance of the Schools"-Francis
sociological study of 1,959 rock- Keppel will give a speech entitled
and-roll licks you learned a lot, "The Effect of Numbers" (Lecture
although I must admit that IV) at 130 Business Administra-
drummer Maurice White could tion Building.
play with most rock bands in 8 p.m.-The Professional Thea-
town. tre Program will present George
Cleveland Eaton, the bass play- Kelly's "The Show-Off" in the
er, I'm not so sure of. It's a Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
hung-up city and he's a hung-up 8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
guy. There's nothing really wrong will present the University Sym-
about a bass player tuning a cello phony Orchestra with conductor
like a bass. But when you can't Josef Blatt and soprano soloist
play it and you rant and rave Eva Likova at Hill Aud.
for twenty out-of-sight, up-tight, THURSDAY, OCT. 26
down-home, soul, funk, nitty- 4 p.m.-The Departmentof
gritty groove solid boss minutes, Classical Studies will present Prof.
then there's something wrong. I Hugh Lloyd-Jones of Oxford Uni-
He started out with Art Blakey's versity speaking on "Zeus and
"Blues March" and ended with Justice in Homer" in Aud. A.
"Ode to Billy Jo." It was the 4:10 p.m.-The Department of
middle section though that sin- Speech Student Laboratory Thea-
cerely was out-of-sight. Don't tell tre Program will present G. B.
me it was soulful cause that Shaw's "Poison, Passion, and Pet-
would mean that Leonard Bern- rification" in the Arena Theatre
stein's classic lecture on the of the Frieze Building.
flatted third and diminished fifth 7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
is soulful. will show James Whale's "Frank-
But Cleveland is a crowd pleas- ! enstein" in the Arehitectir Aid

Coming Fri.,

Buffy Sainte-Marie
Charles Addams - minihaha skirt
w h i c h unquestionably touched
your body with your mind. You
didn't even miss the Motown
backing on "Cripple Creek" and
"Lazarus" cause Buffy made it so
swinging and open that you felt
drums and basses and baritone
saxes.
If there were to be a Buffy
Sainte-Marie Day and I was Gen-
eral Co-Chairman with Ramsey,
(who would never attend meet-
ings cause I'd insist that he stay
home and listen to Art Tatum
records), I'd have the day broken
into four sections:
1. 9:00-12:30: wake up and sing
"Suzanne."
2. 1:30-5:00: all girls parade
in front of my apartment wearing
Buffy outfits in either emerald,
olive, purple, or mocha.
3. 6:00-6:10: remembering that
Buff wrote "You're not a Dream."
4. 6:30-Forever: Buff and I
hitch to Sweden and make love on
the beach.
Ramsey Lewis was horrible.
Horrible. Horrible. Horrible. There
were a lot of people who went to
the concert just hear the trio and
we were glad that Buffy was on
first. But as soon as they began
"Unit 7," the first tune, you
weren't quite sure why the hell
to stay. Maybe the parties didn't
SPoRt;ON Feature Times
0 Ate, . Mondav - Fridav~

er. As a matter of fact the only
thing he left out was a lick from
the "Victors" and the vomit scene
from "Night Games."
I guess the reason why it's hard
to talk about Ramsey is simply
because he didn't do anything.
Perhaps he tried on "Shadow of
Your Smile," but perhaps the
lighting man didn't like for peo-
ple to practice on the job and
that's why he cut the trio off just
a little sooner than Ramsey
planned to.
At the end of the concert I ran
across the street to catch a little
of Odetta. She was singing "He's
Got the Whole; World in His
Hands" and I thought about
Buffy and Ramsey playing To
Tell the Truth on God's palms.
- - - _

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music

8 p.m.-The Professional Thea-
tre Program will present George
Kelly's "The Show-Off" in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present pianist Reid Nibley in
a concert at Rackham Lecture
Hall.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society will present Jose Mo-
lina Bailes Espanoles at Hill Aud.
SATURDAY, OCT. 28
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will show Val Newton's "The Curse
of the Cat People" in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present
George Kelly's "The Show-Off" in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
SUNDAY, OCT.29
7 and 9:05 p.i-Cinema Guild
will show Marion C. Cooper and
Ernest B. Schoedasach's "King
Kong" in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.--The University Musical
Society will present Carl Orff's!
"Carmina Burana" at Hill Aud.
2:30 and 8 p.m.-The Profes-
sional Theatre Program will pre-
sent George's Kelly's "The Show-
Off" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre. ,

House. 802 Monroe, -

* **AG111 u btlc ~c1 tt. A UfU IA.
8 p.m.-The Professional Thea-
tre Program will present George
Kelly's "The Show-Off" in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
FRIDAY, OCT. 27
4:15 p.m.-As part of the Wil-
liam W. Cook Lectures on Amer-
ican Institutions-"The Govern-
ance of the Schools"-Francis
Keppel will give a speech entitled
"The Governance and the Individ-
ual" (Lecture V) at 130 Business
Administration Building.
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will show Howard Hawkes' "The
Thing from Another World" in the
Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-As part of the Depart-
ment of Astronomy Visitor's Night,
Dr. Richard L. Sears of the Uni-
versity of Michigan will speak on

I

WITCH-WATCH BASH
North Campus Commons a
9-12 P.M.

4

I
I WEDNESDAY and TH URSDAY

Oct. 27

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
UsE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NO'UCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available inIny
Rm. 1011 SAB.
Young Friends, T Group weekend,
Oct. 27-29, 8:00 meet at Friends meet-
ing house, 1420 Hill. Bring sleeping
bags if possible.
Communication Sciences Lecture
Series, Tuesday, Oct. 24, 4:10 p.m.,
Michigan Union, room 3A., speaker Dr.
Abbe Mowshowtz: "The Social Role
of the Scientist."
* * .
Graduate Assembly, general meeting.
Wed., Oct. 25, 7:30 p.m. East Con-
ference room (fourth floor), Rackham
Bldg. Agenda to include: "Graduate
Students and the Draft," "The Role
of Graduate Students in University
Policy Making."
* * *
Concert Dance Organization is holding
modern dance classes every Tuesday
7:30 and Thursday 8:15 at the Barbour
Gym Dance Studio. Classes are held
for men on Thur. at 7:30 p~m.
Sigma Theta Tau, first meeting of
year: Business meeting and program.
Oct. 24, 7:00 p.m., School of Nursing
Building.
* * *
Bach Club, meeting; talk by Dr. David
Crawford on "Bach's Cantata no. 140.
ra Unionof the Sacred and the Secular,"
Thursday, Oct. 26, 8:00 p.m., Guild
House, 802 Monroe. r

4:10 P.M.

Department of Speech
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
presents
POISON, PASSION AND PETREFACTION
or The Fatal Gazogene
by George Bernard Shaw

04

t

OCTOBER 25th and 26th ADMISSION FREE
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building

A

FINAL rn' VILL E
WEEK 75 No. MAPLE RD.-769-130*

III

CINEMA II
presents
FEDERICO FELLINI'S
LA STRADA

THE MIRWCS'
JUIE ANDREWS ".4TTM iAXL.VI

I

I

TEC

Io.THE GEORGE ROY HILL WALTER MIRISCH PROI
HNICOLOR {

CORPORAION PRFSEMT
ON SYDOW-RICHARD HARRIS
)DUCIoN a"HAWAII"ANAVIsIoN. COU ,tix

*1
4

I

ANTHONY
GIULIETTA

QUINN
MASINA

Barbara Sf
PLUS,

ee e
0. . .

SHORT: Chapter 6
Flash Gordon
Friday, Saturday
and- Sunday
7 and 9:15 P.M.
Auditorium A
Angell Hall 50c

reter aldwin
HE WAS A
MAN ON
THE LAM!

I

STARTS THURSDAY!
Direct From ItsRoadshow Engagement-.EveryTicket HolderGuaranteed A Seat
SPECIAL POPULAR PICES - SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
'SEATS RESERVED
-N.Y DAILY NEWS
"STEVE McQUEEN THE
SAND
AT HIS BEST!" PEBBLESI
-N. Y TIMES
AN ARGYLESOLAR PRODUCTIONS PICTURE
FILMED IN PANAVISION'-COLOR BY DELUXE_"t

I

I

e
i t
RICHARD LONG

i

11

3rd
WEEK

c

"'TO SIR, WITH LOVE' IS ENTERTAINMENT
OF THE WARMEST SORT, SO RIGHT THAT
YOU WOULD STAND UP AND CHEER!"
-Archer Winsten, New York Post
SIDNEY POITIER

THIS WEEK AT
ThE ARK
1421 Hill Street

8:30 P.M.

'jWednesday- A ,HIO9T!.--with Bob Wie Marty Ecclestone, Judy Ig.

I

X -W:,

i

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