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October 20, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-20

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAEE TRRV1a~

i L .R " Aa..VL1J

W

Mariner 5
Checks Data
Above Venus
U.S. Space Probe
Follows Soft Landing
Of Russian Capsule
PASADENA, Calif. (I)-Mariner
5 flew within 2,500 miles of Venus
yesterday, its electronic fingers
double-checking findings of a
Russian capsule that soft-landed
on the planet Wednesday.
Scientists at the Jet Propulsion
Laboratory said Mariner 5's in-
struments worked well during the
19,000 mile an hour fly-by and
promised a "quick look" at the
results-within a few hours.
The 2,400 pound Soviet Venus
4's parachuted instrument pack-
age radioed from the planet's sur-
face that it found conditions hos-
tile to known forms of life: an
atmosphere composed almost en-
tirely of carbon dioxide, with a
pressure 15 times that on Earth,
and a surface temperature of 536
degrees Farenheit.
Signal Blackout
The 540-pound U.S. space-
craft's radio signals were blacked
out for 21 minutes as it looped
behind the planet. Signals stop-
ped at 10:39 a.m. PDT and re-
sumed at 11.
The point of closest approach
was at 10:34 a.m. PDT, minutes
before the blackout. Mariner 5
was designed only to fly past the
planet-not land a capsule.
One of its major experiments
took place just before and after
it passed behind Venus. The
amount of distortion of radio
waves by Venus' atmosphere gave
scientists a measure of atmos-
pheric density and how high it
extends above the surface.
For two hours during the fly-
by, instruments electronically
measured the amount of hydro-
gen and oxygen in the upper lay-
er of the atmosphere. From this,
scientists said they would be able
to estimate the density of the
heavier, lower layer of carbon
dioxide and check the accuracy
of Venus 4's report on atmos-
pheric -pressure.
Transmit Tape
This data was recorded on tape
and will be played back during a
34-hour transmission period start-
ing 14 hours after fly-by.
Mariner 5 had no way of mea-
suring surface temperature direct-
ly. Scientists said the strength of
emissions from sunlight-excited
atoms of hydrogen and oxygen
would indicate the heat in the up-
per atmosphere and that from
this they could deduce the heat
on the surface.
After the fly-by Mariner 5
streaked on into space, aimed
eventually at an orbit averaging
54 million miles from the sun.

Democrat Governors
Stress War Support

CHARLOTTE AMALIE, V.I .P)
Democratic governors pledged
yesterday to press for a resolution
endorsing the Johnson administra-
tion's Vietnamese policy, despite a
furor over a White House message
that went astray and landed in
Republican hands.
In another development, Gov.
George Romney of Michigan said
he might announce his candidacyI
I for the Republican presidential
nomination Nov. 15.
The wayward message was de-
livered by accident to Gov. Ronald
Reagan of California aboard the
liner Independence, where the gov-{
ernors were holding their 59th
.v national conference while steaming
totward the Virgin Islands.
Question on War
The message asked Price Danielj
of Texas, administration liaison
ted Pressman with the governors, to ques-
tion two Republicans - Govs.
James A. Rhodes of Ohio and John
ooklyn H. Chaffee of Rhode Island-
ooklyn about their support of the Presi-
estors. dent's war policy.
The Republican cited it as evi-
dence the administration was try-'
ing to strong-arm them into a
declaration of support on the war
for the Democrats' political bene-
fit.

-Associat
BROOKLYN PROTEST
Uniformed policemen haul away a student protestor at Br
College yesterday after six precincts of police and the Br
riot squad flew a flying wedge through 2,090 student prot
(See related story, Page 1.)
See-Senate Rejection

Vermont. "Having gone this far,
we have little choice in the mat-
ter."
Republicans had lined up Wed-
nesday in opposition to any reso-P E
lution on Vietnam. But Rhodes
said if a measure came before the
conference when business resumes
today, he would vote to support
U.S. fighting men.
Passage Unlikely
However, with 21 Republicans
- among the 45 state and territorial
governors aboard, it appeared un-
likely the resolution declaring sup-
port of U.S. commitments could
win the three-fourths majority for
passage.
Connally said the Democrats
would force a roll call.
The controversial radiogram,
from White House assistant Mar-
vin W. Watson, covered in detail
the past positions Republican gov-
ernors have taken on Vietnam.
Reagan said he received the
message, a copy not an original,
in an envelope addressed to him
and first assumed it was a state-
ment for general distribution.
His press secretary said the en-
velope was delivered to a Reagan
aide through normal channels, but
would not say exactly who made
the delivery.
In Washington, the White House
insisted the radioprogram was "a BY
private communication ... to Gov.
Daniel at his request," and that
the President had not asked any-
one to introduce a resolution on
the subject of Vietnam.
Romney, who urged Regan to,
publicize the missent message, said iL
it was a sample of how the ad-
ministration tries to create a false
appearance of support.
He said it was evidence of "snow
job, manipulation, credibility gap,
hogwash, brainwash too."
A presidential hopeful himself,
Romney said he had bought 30
minutes of Columiba Broadcasting
System television time on Nov. 15
for a report to the nation on his!
views of city problems and other
items.
Asked whether one of the items
might be his expected announce-
ment of candidacy, he replied: "It's
a possibility, but I have not de- ~ b s r~
cided."

bac
A STRIKING AND ORIGINAL TRAGi-COMEDY
IEL

Of House Financial Cuts

WASHINGTON QP) - Adminis-
tration hopes rose yesterday that
the Senate will refuse to go along
with House action ordering that
government spending be cut by
an estimated $6 billion to $8 bil-
lion.
Sen. Milton R. Young of North
Dakota, top Republican on the
Senate Appropriations Committee,
said after an initial hearing on
the House measure that it is "so
full of ambiguities that I don't
see how we could pass it as is."
Two Democratic committee
members also said there will have
to be some changes made.
Sen. John O. Pastore (D-RI),
said the resolution which the
House passed Wednesday night
would "lead to financial chaos,"
and Sen. Spessard L. Holland, (D-
Fla), said the measure "has to
be changed and changed very vi-
tally."
Support for the House action
came from Sen. John Stennis, (D-
Mis), who said "the people expect
us to do something" to cut spend-
ing.
The White House, which was
rocked by the House directive that
with some major exceptions gov-
ernment agencies must hold spend-
ing this fiscal year to last year's
levels, stood by hopefully.
President Johnson's budget di-
rector, Charles L. Schultze, told
the Senate committee the House

stricture would mean limiting fed-
eral expenditures to $129.4 billion,
a reduction of $7.1 billion com-
pared to the current budget esti-
mate of outlays in the current
fiscal year that ends next June 30.
He said this estimate does not
take into account any additional
increase in Vietnam war expendi-
tures or civilian and military pay
raises voted since the President's
budget was submitted.

As the Independence cruised to
shore in this Virgin Island harbor,
debate stormed on over the Viet-
nam issue.
"We have a duty and an obli-
gation to take a position on Viet-
nam, and we're certainly going to
run with the resolutions and I
don't care how many votes we get,"
said Texas Gov. John B. Connally,
a Democrat.
"I don't think it's a partisan is-
sue," he said.
"I think we'll go forward," said
Democrat Gov. Philip H. Hoff of

liant Broadway

Cast

Directed by MARCELLA CISNEY
Designed by ELDON ELDER

Mississippi Jury Deadlocks
On'64 Civil Rights Murders

MERIDIAN, Miss. (R) - As the
defendants chatted in a hallway,
an all-white jury in a room 10
feet away sought to reach a ver-
dict yesterday in the case of 18
men charged with conspiracy in
the 1964 deaths of three civil
rights workers.
The seven men and five women
on the panel took the case
Wednesday afternoon.
At one point during the second
day of deliberations, the jury
asked U.S. Dist. Court Judge
Harold Cox for additional in-
structions.
Request Denied
However, opposing attorneys,
meeting with the judge in his
chambers, could not agree and the
request was denied.
This prompted one defense at-
torney, who asked not to be
named, to tell newsmen: "They
appear to be deadlocked."
Justice Department attorneys
claimed during the eight days of
testimony that the 18 defendants,
all white men, took part in a
"calculated, cold - blooded" Ku

Klux Klan plot to -carry out the
"midnight murders" of the three
young men - two whites and a
Negro.
The defendants were charged
with conspiring to violate the
civil rights of the slain men, Mi-
chael Schwerner, 24, and Andrew
Goodman, 20, both white New
Yorkers, and James Chaney, 22, a
Meridian Negro.
Accuse Sheriff
Among those accused were
Neshoba County Sheriff Lawrence
A. Rainey; Sheriff nominee Ethel
G. "Hop" Barnette; Chief Deputy
Cecil R. Price, and Sam Hollo-
way Bowers, identified by the
FBI as a Ku Klux Klan imperial
wizard.
Maximum penalty for violation
of the 1870 law is 10 years in
prison and a $5,000 fine,
No state charges were ever
brought in the case. The con-
spiracy charge was the strongest
that could be filed by the Justice
Department since the slaying did
not occur on federal property.

to The.Michigan Daily

_ .
i
r

Vt i FORUM
Proudly Presents a

World News Roundup

FELLINI FILM FESTIVAL
STARTS TONIGHT
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By The Associated Press
ALGIERS - Stokely Carmi-
chael, touring Africa and Asia to
make friends for Black Power,
said yesterday he would follow
the revolutionary footsteps of the
late Ernesto Che Guevara.
"Che's blood will nourish liber-
ation movements throughout the
world," Carmichael declared in a
press statement in tribute to the
Cuban guerrilla leader, who was
killed last week in Bolivia.
"I will join this struggle my-
self, and I hope that when my
death comes it will be like that
of Che," he said.
* * *
LONDON-A brakemen's strike
threw Britain's state-owned rail
services into chaos yesterday
night and threatened major dis-
ruption of industries already wor-
ried by dock labor troubles.
Rail traffic to and from the in-
dustrial Midlands ground to a
halt when brakemen refused to
take on additional duties imposed
with the withdrawal of firemen.
The British rails have abandoned
TONIGHT
Over ASia
dir. Usevalid Pudoikin, 1928
Russian, Subtitles
Exciting picture of the
destruction of imperial-
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velous character revela-

steam for diesel and electric loco-
motives.

ewhat different,
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rTo
EASTMAN OCQLO2

NEW YORK - The $6-billion_
merger of the Pennsylvania and
New York Central railroads was
approved yesterday by a speciala
three-judge federal court, which
gave opponents 15 days to appeal1
to the U.S. Supreme Court.
The judges dismissed all com-
plaints against the merger, larg-
est in U.S. railroad history.
However, they stayed for 15
days an Interstate Commerce
Commission order consummating
the transaction, in order to givej
opponents a chance to appeal.
* * *
PITTSBURGH-The Washing-
ton, Pa., plant of the Jessop Steel
Co. yesterday became the first
large mill in the mountry to order
a shutdown of its major plant be-
cause of the strike by 10,000 to
20,000 independent drivers.
Steel producers have diverted
shipments to rail, but there have
been delays and production cut-
backs since the wildcat walkout'
began nine weeks ago.

I
I'
a
1
i; {

GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20
NOON LUNCHEON-25c
PROFESSOR ARTHUR P. MEN DEL
Department of History

'is

Joseph E. Leine yrm
FEDERICO FELLINI'SU;
..MA O ELO UATRO "CAUD1A CARflNALE"ANOUK AMEE"SWNRA MILO
AOSSEIIA FAI.K BRBARASTEELE r. aistu ae am.-~

An cEmbassy Pictures Release

"RESPONSE TO THE
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Discussion of his MICHIGAN DAILY
article of Saturday, October 14
FRIDAY EVENING DINNER
(AT COST)
6:00 P.M.
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 662-5189 BY 2 P.M. FRIDAY

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Monday, October 23-7 and 9:30 p.m.

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MIIAN VAI

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