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October 20, 1967 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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1

1IENNA AT HILL:

Symphony Has European Flair

By R. A. PERRY
In the span of a month, the
University Musical Society has
brought to Ann Arbor two of the
world's most prestigious orches-
tras. In September, the New York
Philharmonic played under Leon-
ard Bernstein, and last night in
Hill Auditorium Wolfgang Sawal-
lisch and the Vienna Symphony
Orchestra illuminated Schubert
and Beethoven. What a contrast
these two musical organizations
are!
Bernstein whips up melodra-
matic and hysterical forte cli-
maxes; Sawallisch almost reti-
cently grades them into the or-
ganic whole. The New York's
woodwinds, in an attempt for ul-
tra-clarity, constantly stand far
out from the musical fabric; the
Vienna section is always totally
integrated, yet with no loss of
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NE'UN CEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Rm. 1011 SAB.
* * *
Gild House, Friday noon luncheon,
Prof. Arthur P. Mendel: "Response to
the Two Revolutions," 802 Monroe,
also Friday evening dinner (at cost),
6 p.m.
.* * *
Mobilization: Friday, Oct. 20, 7:15 p.m.
- Buses loading on Thompson between
Jefferson and Madison. Cars and
drivers urgently needed. Call 663-9564
or 663-7814 or 662-1344.
Unitarian Universalist Student Relig-
sous Liberals: Joint discussion with
Newman Club on "Problems of Doc-
trine and Ecumenisn," 7:00 p.m., Oct.
22, First Unitarian Church, 1917 Wash-
tenaw. Supper at 6:00.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, dis-
cussion groups meet at Engin Arch,
7:30 p.m., Oct. 20.
* *e
Southern Asia Club - Bag lunch to-
day at noon in Lane Hall. Masa Nishi-
hara will speak on and show slides of
his recent trip to Southeast Asia.
Baha'i Student Group, informal dis-
cussion, Fri., Oct. 20 at 8:00 p.m. 520
N. Ashley. All welcome. Call 662-3548
if you need transportation.
* * *
La Sociedad Hispamica, una reunion,
Mon., Oct. 23, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze.
Coffee, conversation, Hispanic music,
Verigan todos!
THURSDAY
October 26th

definition. Angular and hard-
edged, the New York ensemble
seems so often neurotically driven
onward, while Sawallisch never
pushes, but molds a natural yet
never complacent flow.
In general, this contrast derives
from a different musical tradition
and environment. New Yorkers
shirk the East River, while saftig
Viennese secretaries wade in the
Danube.
The concert opened with a per-
formance of Schubert's ever-gra-
cious Symphony No. 6 that was
reminiscent of Bruno Walter's
easy way with the work. Display-
ing the most consistently excellent
string sound I have ever heard, the
Vienna Symphony never allowed
the endless lyricism to become
saccharine nor let dynamic rises
interrupt the idyllic mood.
Though it may prick a few sen-
sibilities to say so, it is really
not necessary to listen carefully
to Schubert's symphonies, (as op-
posed to his songs, or chamber
music), for to do so only reveals
thematic repetiveness and struct-
ural simplicities. This work, and
Sawallisch's treatment, however,
provided a perfect balm for a tired
day, and a screen behind which
one's mind could wander and muse
at will.
No musical sedative was Alfred
Uhl's "Concerto a ballo" which fol-
lowed the Schubert. Beginning as
a distasteful Honeggerian pastiche,

a junk collage of brief and polar
musical elements, the music grad-
ually gnaws at the surface of the
mind and seems almost about to
say something, to take form. It is
generally wise to play down the
game of visual association, (the
"moonlight sonatta" syndrome),
but this music did seem a perfect
soundtrack for the paintings of
George Grosz, especially at mo-
ments such as the obscene snare-
drum two-step in the third sec-
tion. Sawallisch gave the work,
which bears rehearing, a typically
unexaggerated perforiance.
Beethoven's Fifth is such a war-
horse that ironically enough it is
usually avoided in tour program-
ming. Thus it was refreshing to re-
experience the work, more so in
such a monumental reading as the
Vienna Symphony gave it last
night. If the performance lacked
the electric tension of Toscanini
or the finely-wrought details of
Kleiber, it compensated in con-
veying the structural grandeur and
pure aural massiveness of the
work. For these reasons the under-
pinning of the "fate motif" by the
basses was somewhat slighted in
the first movement, but the empy-
rean heights of the fourth were
majestically scaled.
For an encore, the audience
heard the definite performance of
the Blue Danube Waltz, which is,
actually, saying a lot.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg.be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,
Student organization notices are not
accepted forpublication. For more
information call 764-9270.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20
Day Calendar
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Seminar -- "Managing the
Programmed Learning Effort": Michi-
gan Union, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

The Center for Chinese Studies -
Professor Ralph Croizier, University of
Rochester, "Medicine and Cultural Na-
tionalism in Modern China," Room 200,
Lane Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Department of Astronomy Visitors'
Night - Mr. James A. Loudon, The
University of Michigan, "The Moon."
To Observe: The Moon and Saturn:
Auditorium D, Angell Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program - George
Kelly's The Show-Off: Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theater, 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
Tentative lists of seniors for December
graduation have been posted on the
bulletin board in the firstyfloor lobby,
Administration Building. Any changes
therefrom should be requested of the
Recorder at Office of Registration and
Records, Window Number A, 1513 -Ad-
ministration Building.
The Department of Romance Lan-
guages - Lecture by Lucien Gold-
mann, Professeur a L'Ecole des Hautes
Etudes (Sorbonne) "Le Theatre de Jean
Genet Mon. Oct. 23, Auditorium A,
Angell Hall, 4:10 p.m.

National Merit Scholarship Checks ares
available at 2226 Student Activities
Building.
Michigan Higher Education Assistance
Authority Scholarships are available at
the Cashier's Office in the Administra-
tion Building. Students who have $174
MHflEA.A Scholarships for fall and
winter terms, and no University of
Michigan Scholarships, should sign up{
at the Financial Aids Office 2011 Stu-
dent Activities Building, for the special
tuition increase payment to be made
in October.
Now University of Michigan students
many apply for the Tuskege-Hich. stu-
dent exchange for the second semester
at Tuskege, Fbruary 2 to June 3,
1968. Applications for the program may
be obtained from Mr. John Chavis or
Mrs. Betty Latoszewski in the Tuskegee
Exchange Office, 1223 Angell Hall, 764-
9128. The form should be completed
and returned to this office by Novem-
ber 1, 1967.
The approval of the following student
sponsored events becomes effective after
the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be

withheld until th approval has becom
effective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored eventsare available in Rooms
1001 and 1546 of the Student Activities
Building.
Loung Democrats - Film "1000 Days"
- ct. 18. 1967 - 7-11 Dm. -- An zell

Peace Corps Test Sat.. Oct. 20, at 1:30
p.m. at Downtown Post Office.
October 21 - Deadline for Foreign
Service Officer Exam., for State Dept,
and USIA Appli avail at Bureau.
CURRENT POSITION. OPENINGS:

- Ot - 7-.o . u. i 11 N r- niw ; Northwestern University Grad School
Hai____A.of Business Admin., Chicago, Ill. -F.
Society of Automotive Engineers - G. Austin Scholarships, MBA, two year
Hydrostatic Transmissions - Oct. 18, applic due. March 1.
7:30 p.m. - 1042 East Engineering.
University of Pennsylvania, Wharton
Sigma Theta Tau - Open Meeting School of Finance and Conmerce, study
with Speaker - Oct. 24, 8:15 p.m. - in Publ, Financ, Econ and Poli Set
Student Nurse Building - 5104. Master of Governmental Admin. in
Publ. Finance. PhD program also.

Aq

I

MUSKET (UAC) - Musket Tour Show
Ticket Sales - Oct. 25-Nov. 1-10 a.m.-
4 p.m.-Fishbowl and Diag.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
FSEE tests for which application was
made in Sept. will be held at Down-
town Post Office, Main at Catherine
Streets.

Local Corporation - Financial Analyst,
respon for budgeting and cost con-
trol. Male, MBA. strong in acctg. stat.
background. mid-20's, some exper. pref.
Girl Scouts of America, Kalamazoo,
Mich. - Executive Director, woman
or man. BA, exper. in admin., finance,
pubi. rel., and supervision, wk w/adult
volunteer groups.
(Continued on Page 6)

I

TONIGHT

AT

8:00

P.M.

TONIGHT and SATURDAY at

T HE IFARK
1421 Hill Street
Dave Siglin and Shelly Posen
(of Toronto, Canada)
8:30 P.M.
singing City Folk Music
playing 6- and 12-string guitar and banjo
$1 .00 Cover Includes Entertainment and Refreshments
STARTS

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METRO- ~
GOLOWY*
MAYER
PRESENTS
A JOSEPH
JANNI
PRODUCT TN

WEDNESDAY
OCTOBER 25
8:00 P. M.
RENCE STAMP
PETER FINCH
ALAN BATES

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A
VERY
SPECIAL
PREVIEW
OF A VERY
SPECIAL
COMEDY
IN COLOR..
PLUS OUR
REGULAR
FEATURE
AT THE
STATE THEATRE
once only at 7:00 P.M.

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in GEORGE KELLY'S

TIE SESW-S II

SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES
SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES
MATINEES 1:15 - 4:50
EVENINGS 8:30
NO SEATS RESERVED
Every Ticket Holder Guaranteed A Seat
-V
A OEwIS IWDON
.STEVE MCQUEEN
RICHARD ATENBD00IA
RICARD CRENA"
CANDICEIER6ENRAIrATANDRIANE
~~om t
ROBERT WISE "ROBERT ANDERSON "Ri0_ARD NcJ(ENA
BQRIS LEE iRRY 6fDSMITlI
NI AG6IUSOU* ?RaCI1ONS FiflRE IU P~I I WO a
THURSDAY at the
STATE Theatre
Phone 434-0190
4nn 6n. CARPENTER RUAD

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IN 70mm.."PANAVISION*. METROCOLOR MGM
RESERVED SEAT TICKETS NOW AT BOX-OFFICE OR BY MAIL
Box Office Open Daily Noon to 9 Evenings at 8 p.m. - Sundays at
Tickets at all Sears Stores. 7:30 p.m. - Matinees Wed.;
Auto Club Branches, Sat. and Sun. at 2:PO p.m.
JL, Hudson's Major Stores Free Parking -- WO. 1-5788

Oct. 17-29

EVENINGS AT 8:00 P.M.
MATINEES SUNDAY AT 2:00 P.M.

-.....:%r:" .......... ........":?: ...........................

DAL P-419

# uI/'NL0-1O TI
DIRECTOR'S FESTIVAL
FRI.-SAT.---OCT. 20-2 1
TRU FAD'S JU- 1andjI
STARRING JEANNE MOREAU AND OSKAR WERNER
'Although Truffaut evokes the romantic nostalgia before
World war , he exquisitely Illuminates a modern woman.
This film established him as the leader of the New Wave.

G '
r

THE WORLD'S MOST IMPOSSIBLE ROBBERY.
WITH THE SCREEN'S MOST IMPOSSIBLE GANG..
IN THE YEAR'S MOST HILARIOUS PICTURE!
COLUMBIA PICTURES presente
JIM HUTTON ORTHYPROINEMLTON B ERLE
JOEY BISHOP
BOB DENVER en
WALTER BRENNANIN

it

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I

SUN.-MON.-OCT. 22-23
MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI'S
sstoy of Italy's idle rich established Antonionl ,s one
of the leading directors in the world and is a provocative
statement about modern society. All-Time Film Great.

I

"'TO SIR, WITH LOVE' IS A MOVIE THAT
REMINDS YOU OF WHAT REALLY WARM
GOOD MOVIES ARE LIKE. YOU CRY AND
YOU LAUGH BUT IT'S A BEAUTIFUL MOVIE
AND PERFECT FROM TOP TO BOTTOM!"
-Judith Crist, NBC TV

I

TUES.-WED.-OCT. 24-25
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
THE LADYYAflISHES
Constantly flashing from melodrama to comedy, the film
thrills the viewer and teases him to outguess the master
of intrigue. With Michael Redgrave & Dame May Whitty.

"SIDNEY POITIER IS SUPERB!" The young
players enact, their roles with remarkable
reality! Purposeful and, at the same time,
wadWanda Hale,
warm, moving and humorous!" New York Daily News
TO SIR, WITH LOVE' IS ENTERTAINMENT
OF THE WARMEST SORT, SO RIGHT THAT
YOU WOULD STAND UP AND CHEER!"
-Archer Winsten, New York Post

I

I

CINEMA U~
PRESENTS
PETER SELLERS
MARGARET LEIGHTON
IN
THE WALTZ
OF THE TOREADORS
(TECHNICOLOR, 1962)
An hilarious, stylistic film version of the classic farce.
Sellers at his best.

"A colorful, kicky
movie in the
mod mood!"
-Good Housekeeping Magazine
"PICTURE OF
THE MONTH!"
-Seventeen Magazine
"Sidney Poitier
just perfect
.. this film
will enthrall you!"
-Cosmopolitan Magazine

#I

I

CULUMBIA PICiURt Presents
SIDNEY
POITIER

VICTOR RONOJ J KU Ul[Fflan flan dimmmn nrK

I

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i

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