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October 12, 1967 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-12

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'(PrA141an Batt#
Seventy-Seven Years of Editorial Freedom
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

Nonviolence and the American Way

_ .

Where Opinions Are Free, 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MicH.
Truth Will Prevail

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1967

NIGHT EDITOR: DANIEL OKRENT

The Equitability of the Draft
And the Professional Army

ACCORDING TO MARC ' ANTHONY,
"When the poor hath cried, Caesar
hath wept." The times have changed and
the poor are no longer crying. They are
rioting. And as tears were met with tears,
so violence is met with violence. "Caesar"
is no longer crying. He carries a gun
now.
In response to poverty in America the
federal government has instituted job
training programs. The rationale being
that if the"poverty stricken youth are
educated the entire poverty situation will
Work itself out. These type of programs
seemed to be the right thing to do, but
they have failed miserably.
In the case of job training the error
is obvious. The programs were aimed at
the youth who could not enter college
for academic or economic reasons. But
any young American males who are not
in college are not available for the job
training programs either, they get draft-
ed.
O'ALLEVIATE THE PROBLEM, the
Michigan chapter of the NAACP has
proposed that a draft deferment be given
to youths who enter some form of job
training program.
Under this proposal youths who are
being drafted simply because they
haven't money or the education to enter
college would be given a chance to gain
some practical education which would
allow them to advance themselves in
American society.
The draft deferment would provide,
as it does for a great many college stu-
dents, the incentive needed to keep these
youth in training programs; one of the
problems facing 'job training programs
such as the youth corps.
The deferment would give a youth
from the slums a little wider choice in
life than that between the slum or the
military. In many cases a youth will re-
enlist in the military just to escape from
the poverty at home. When this happens,
the system needs to be changed.
A FEW YEARS AGO the shortage in
man power resulted in two lowerings

of the draft standards. The purpose of
this move was to reach those youths
who could not obtain a college defer-
ment. It was the easy solution to raising
military manpower.
The NAACP's proposal would remove
this group from the draft. With a cut in
its main supply of manpower the govern-
ment would be forced to effect major
changes in the inequitable draft system.
From both sociological and economic-
efficiency the most desirable solution
would be a long-term enlistment, well
paid professional milita'y.
Socially, this would put an end to
having people go to war-against their
will, and fighting for causes the feel are
not theirs.
Economically, the armed forces invest
millions of dollars annually in training.
personel. At the end of each three or
four year enlistment period, they lose
their entire investment as the techni-
cians they've trained leave for better
paying jobs. Several Pentagon officials
have expressed belief that such a system
would lead to increased military ef-
ficiency and economy savings over the
long run would accrue from such a sys-
tem.
THE LOW PAYING MILITARY does, for
the uneducated soldier from the slum,
little economcally to rise him out of his
poverty other than give him a skill that
may be usefull after leaving the services.
A, military whose pay scale would have
to compete with other factions of the
economy would not only benefit the en-
listed man, but the entire' economy as
well.
The proposal by the Michigan NAACP
could be the beginning of a change for
the better for America's underclass. It
could also be the long needed stimuli
needed for a revamping of an outdated
and discriminatory draft system. Whether
it is or not depends on Congress' sincerity
in rectifying the draft, and waging a
real "war on poverty."
-MICHAEL ROBERTS

NONVIOLENCE IN AMERICA:
A DOCUMENTARY HISTORY,
Edited by Staughton Lynd,
Bobbs-Merrill, 1966, 535 pp.
By DAVID KNOKE
I YND'S AVOWED purpose in
documenting the traditions of
non-violence in America is to dis-
pute the comon belief that "non-
violence is a philosophy conceived
by Gandhi and Tolstoy, and re-
cently imported into the United
States by Martin Luther King,
Jr."
The book is a rich anthology of
over 40 documents including such
widely-regarded testaments as
Thoreau's "Civil Disobenience,"
William James' "Moral Equivalent
of War" and King's "Pilgrimage
to Nonviolence." The documents
follow an historical context from
nonviolence's 17th century ori-
gins with the Pennsylvania Qua-
kers, its evolution through 19th
century abolitionism and anarch-
ism, to its present 20th century
forms as a philosophy (pacifism)
and a tactic (non-violent resis-
tence to evil - most notably in
the civil rights movement).
The original forces that drove
nonviolence to flower were fun-
damentally religious. It is not
coincidence that King, a Bap-
tist minister himself, made his
pilgrimage through the tenets of
the Sermon on the Mount and
the example of the Gandhian
campaign to free India.
It is not incidental that what-
ever terms described nonviolence,
they echo the commandments of
Jesus. "The nonviolent resister
not only refuses to shoot his op-
ponent but he also refuses to

hate him," writes King. "At the
center of nonviolence stands the
principle of love . . . We are
not referring to some sentimental
or affectionate emotion . . . Love
in this connection means under-
standing, redemptive good will."
Centuries of fertilization and
application of nonviolence in the
abolition movement, the labor

MANY OF THE DOCUMENTS
go beyond the "I have a dream"
type. Programmatic proposals and
eye-witness accounts of nonvio-
lence in action dominate the re-
cent era.
Draft resistence, which has
blossomed in the past year as
the Vietnam war escalates, may

for war and in securing the de-
sired impression of unanimity
much easier."
THE CIVIL RIGHTS movement
in the South in the early '60's was
the most impressive application
of programmatic nonviolence.
The wave of sit-ins, jail-ins and
marches met with the endemic
violence of the white South and
produced an entire pantheon of
heroes and heroic movements.
In those days the Student Non-
violent Coordinating Committee
still believed in the ability of love
and conscience to overcome in-
justice. The sad self-destruction
of SNCC in the bitter heritage of
Charmichael and Rap Brown
raises profound questions of the
future oftnonviolent tactics if
they cannot adapt, to the special
form of racism in the North.
"Real nonviolence," w r i t e s
David Dellinger, "required an
awareness that white oppressors
and black victims are mutually
entrapped in a set of relation-
ships that violate the submerged
better instincts of everyone. A
way has to be found to relase the
trap and free both sets of vic-
tims."
Not only in the Negroes' strug-
gle for decency is nonviolence
perilously close to extinction. That
lingering, waking nightmare of
America - Vietnam - has be-
come a forge upon which non-
violence will be tempered or
broken.
Staughton Lynd himself proba-
ably knows this as well as anyone
in the civil rights and peace
movement. Since the death of A.
J. Muste last spring, the mantle
of spokesman for the peace move-

ment is devolving more and more
upon the shoulders of this quiet
Quaker.
LYND READ A DOCUMENT at
last week's teach-in which is . a
strong bet to be included in some
future chronicle of the fortunes
of nonviolent direct resistence.
The document is a supportive
statement by older persons for
some 500 draft-age men who are
expected to commit mass civil
disobedience on Oct. 16 by re-
turning their draft cards and re-
fusing further cooperation with
the selective service.
Mass civil disobedience is a long
journey from Thoreau's individ-
ual refusal to pay his war taxes.
Yet it is an integral and inevit-
able outgrowth of the spirit of
nonviolence during a war which
splits America more bitterly than
France was split over Algeria.
"There was a time," said Lynd,
"when we could spend two or
three years as radicals and then
go on to professional careers in
middle-class America. The day
of being patted on the head for
going down to Missippi is over.
"The day of being spit on as
you come out of prison is coming'."
FOR STAUGHTON LYND and
others who have been raised in
the tradition of nonviolent resis-
tence, bearing witness to evil by
direct action is a natural part of
their heritage.
By themselves they may ac-
complish little. But by their ex-
ample they may yet touch that
part of the understanding hum-
anity community which exists
within even the most misguided of
us.

Author Lynd

movement, pacifism and civil
rights, h a v e created major
changes. It has evolved from
early concepts as largely a Chris-
ian dutyto avoid potentially com-
promising situations to a con-
cept in which the resister actively
engages his oppressor and tries
to "exterminate all enemies by
turning them i n t o faithful
friends."

well have taken its cue from Rev.
A. J. Muste who wrote, after the
draft law's passage, that pacifists
should not accept alternative ser-
vices to conscription.
"To me it seems that submit-
ting to conscription even for civil-
ian service is permitting oneself
thus to be branded by the State,"
Muste explained. "It makes the
work of the State in preparing

Letters: Problems Facing the Pilot Programs

To the Editor:
AS MOST OF THE Pilot stu-
dents, we have read with in-
terest the two articles and the
October 10 editorial dealing with
the Pilot Program.
It is apparent that The Daily
has finally brought to light most
of the major problems confronting
the Pilot students. We don't want
to repeat what The Daily said, be-
cause it did such a commendable
job of pointing up what is present-
ly lacking in the program. The one
obvious omission is the fact that
during registration, a great per-
centage, of Pilot sections quickly
fill up with non-Pilot students,
leaving prospectively Pilots "up in
the air." This is one additional
item that must be looked into by
the Standing Committee for Pilot
Program as well as President-des-
ignate Fleming.
However, Pilot students have not
been standing idlely by the run-
way. The Student Pilot Council
(S.P.C,.) has been formed within
the student body to work towards
as many of these needed reforms
as possible. S.P.C. is a coordina-
ting committee composed of rep-
resentatives from the five auto-
nomous Pilot houses, which hopes
to form a more coherent commu-
nity. Furthermore, through its
structure, S.P.C. will bring togeth-
er to resources of the academic.
social and administrative capa -
cities of the five individual houses.
The Pilot Program was con-
ceived with the "Wright" idea, but
time has come for it to graduate
into the "jet age."
-Jack Myers,
S.P.C. coordinator
-Jeri Albertson
Asst. Coordinator
-Nan Rice,
-Brian Zemach,
Social Co-chairmen
Barry's Boys
To The Editor:
THE PROLIX DIATRIBE in the
Letters section of Wednesday's
Daily against Senator Goldwater,
his enthusiastic supporters, and
those who hold that there are
situations in which certain values
take precedence over human life

is an excellent, if unfortunate,
example of the simplistic, atti-
tude towards reality that seems to
afflict the writer and so many
of his contemporaries.
Perhaps it is useless to com-
ment on the ill-conceived and
hastily prepared remarks of this
young man whose personal ex-
perience is so limited and whose
study ofthistory has been so shal-
low that he condemns war out
of hand, recognizes no greater
evil than death, and fails to rea-
lize that he might well not be
here in an American university
among his liberal, intellectual
peers if his immediate predeces-
sors had adopted similar short-
sighted attitudes in earlier per-
iods of stress. Nevertheless, as
the "partisan" who committed
the apparently unpardonable sin
of applauding some of Senator
Goldwater's speech "vigorously"
and who "proudly" admitted his
preference for the honest Gold-
water over the duplicitous mani-
pulator Johnson, I have an in-
terest in offering brief rebuttal
to some of the charges and im-
plications of the letter Mr. Har-
wood ingenuously admits is emo-
tional.
No rational conservative sug-
gests that men be killed because
of their belief in communism.
When this beliefnhowever, leads
these misguided men to commit
murderous attacks on village lea-
ders, government employees and
innocent civilians, then the re-
alist may be led to the conclu-
sion that killing these men is by
far the lesser of the two evils.
It is certain that Senator Gold-
water would question an order to
kill Harold Wilson, even if Con-
gress said it was "vital to the
'Honor of The Country'." He re-
alizes, as I do, that as long as
Congress is elected by individu-
als who arrive at snap judgments
about fellow students' murderous
instincts based on their "vigor-
ous" applause and "a haughty
look," then the orders of the
Congress are to be automatically
questioned.
I for one am not afraid to live
in a society whose moral stan-
dards include a hierarchical ar-

rangement in which Justice
stands above human life. On the
other hand, this society, known
as America, also permits dissent
and even emigration, for those
unwilling or unable to put up
with the chenilles of taxation -
and patriotic service.
-Cyrus R. Sisson, Grad
International
To the Editor:
THANKS TO The Daily for
bringing out some very timely
reports on the International Cen-
ter. It is indeed sad that this
University which over the past
150 years has built up such in-
ternational reputation as to be
able to bring a glittering array of
international dignitaries for the
Sesquicentennial celebration, is
now taking a path which will turn
the International Center into a
deprived reservation, betrayed,
isolated and forgotten.
As if things were not bad
enough when the University raised
the tuition by some $500 a year,
the foreign student now finds that
the International Center has to
cut down on a number of services
such as: the number of hours the
centbr remains open, cut back
the newspapers their receive, etc.,
indeed, cheap!
In our opinion the International
Center serves a variety of func-
tions to the foreign student rang-
ing anywhere from providing a
second home, to sheltering him
from abuse, be it from the Immi-
gration Department, or any reac-
tionary member of the Univer-
sity's schools and departments, or
from a regressive philosophy of
the State. It is a deplorable situ-
ation if the Center does not have
proper operational budget. Some
explanation from the Board of
OPINION
The Daily has begun accept-
ing articles from faculty, ad-
ministration, and students on
subjects of their choice. They
are to be 600-900 words in
length and should be submitted
to the Editorial Director.

4

'The Looking Glass' War

ownD SAYS

t D~ON'T GET ALONG.

WITIA HIPP'IES ?"

ET'S PLAY PRETEND and conjure up
a young, blond, 1dCa!istic-type chap.
He can be our hero. In the deeply rever-
ed Horatio Alger tradition, he is a self-
made man because he hasn't had the
wondrous benefits of a college education.
As any reader of "Babyhip" has al-
ready guessed, our hero psychodelically
decides to start an underground news-
paper as the medium for his, message.
Steeped in the capitalist tradtion, he
patiently accumulates enough capital to
pay for several trialt issues of his paper
and even manages to gather an enthu-
siastic staff.
After spending the requisite three
week to come up with a deeply symbolic
"Alice in Wonderlandish" name for the
paper, the staff, under the guidance of
our intrepid hero, manages to deliver to
the printer the dummy of the first issue
only two days after the promised dead-
line.
IT IS ABOUT this point in our narrative
when the tiny elves who have been
casting a bright glow over our hero's
enterprise vanish, and the cold, hard
glare of reality destroys our pretty little
tableau.
For it seems last Friday our hero (Jef-
frey Hoff) went to his local (Ann Arbor)
printer (Demco Enterprises) to get 5,000
copies of his paper ("The Looking
Glass") and recived instead the abuse
of all present who loudly insisted that
they were not going to print this sort
of stuff.
What the printers objected to, ac-
cording to Hoff, was an article on resis-
tence already printed in "Vietnam Sum-
mer News" which, the printers main-
tained, obliquely advocated the assasin-
ation of President Lyndon B. Johnson.
Since then Hoff has been turned down
by at least six printers here in Ann Ar-
bor, several in Detroit, and one in Man-
chester, each of whom fears community
reaction or disagrees strongly enough to

refuse to print "The Looking Glass."
If one wanted to dwell on the political
implications of "The Looking Glass" af-
fair one could make such hacknyed, but
nonetheless true, observations as how
incidents like this illustrate the funda-
mental limitations of our allegedly demo-
cratic society.
But no amount of political polemic
will get "The Looking Glass" published.
Since printers are free to accept what
they like, there is apparently no legal
issue involved here. So unless a coura-
geous printer is found, or "The Looking
Glass" buys it own press, Ann Arbor's
first underground newspaper will appear
stillborn.
THE POSSIBLE premature death of
"The Looking Glass" would be a loss for
the entire University community because
it promised to be a courageous and con-
troversial little newspaper which plan-
ned to focus on the acute and relatively
ignored problems of our "All American
City."
-WALTER SHAPIRO
No Commen
ATHENS, Oct 8 - The Greek military
junta has asked Andreas Papandreou,
who is in jail awaiting trail on charges
of high treason, to advise it on economic
matters. . .
"Brigadier Patakos is understood to
have visited Mr. Papandreou in the
Averoff prison in Athens about 10 days
ago. Mr. Papandreou, who headed a left-
of-center faction of the Center Union
party led by his father, former Premier
George Papandreou, is accused of having
conspired to have a group of sympathetic
officers seize control of the army .. .
"The Minister (Ionnis Rodinos-Orlan-
dos, Under Secretary of Coordination and
one of the officials responsible for dir-
ecting the country's economy), backed
by R n'ar PaatP lne iircii Mr Pana.n-

Governors or the Vice-President
of Student Affairs is urgently
needed.
-The Guild Council of
Guild House
Calcuta
To the Editor:
YESTERDAY (October 8) I was
surprised to learn (through
the UM Television "the Worlds of
India") that Vasco da Gama land-
ed in "what we now know as Cal-
cutta." Indian history textbooks
have always credited a small port
on the westycoast of India with the
first European landing-the name,
Calicut.
It was also heartening to know
that the British had a very valid
reason for conquering the land-
they needed stability in the coun-
try so that they could trade with
it.

I await the sequel to this pro-
gram with curiosity.
-Mahabanoo N. Tata
Uniforms
To the Editor:
0 FTEN WHEN I leave the sta-
- dium after. a Michigan defeat
I hear members of the crowd say
to each other-by way of consola-
tion, I suppose. "Well, at least we
have the best band." But no such
comments reached my ears last
Saturday when Navy defeated
Michigan. Small wonder, I think,
with the Navy's drum and buggle
corps making the Michigan band
look, both in dress and in ma-
neuvers, like something P.T. Bar-
num might have dreamed up in
one of his more jaded moments.
Just the removal of those maize
and blue sateen capelets would be
a step in the right direction.
-Elizabeth G. Patterson

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