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October 12, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-12

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12,1967.,'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE R, R _%

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1987 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A 1 'FURF4CiIJ

ar,,,

CORE To Abandon SETTLEMENT DELAYED:
Ghettos of Brooklyn Steel Strike Vi

iolence Continues
sed Peace Pact

NEW YORK (P) - As weaken-
ing sunlight and chill fall air
foretell the coming of winter to
the littered streets of Bedford-
Stuyvesant, angry members of
the Congress of Racial Equality
are preparing to abandon Brook-
lyn.
Disguted by a year of bitter,
debilitating, sometimes violent
fights with the city administra-
tion, the police, the antipovertyj
program, school teachers and
moderate Negro leaders, the ac-I
tivists have decided to head forj
a rural retreat, and a simpler
life.
"We will buy our land, settle,
there and till the soil," said Ro-
bert Carson, 32, director of Brook-
lyn CORE. "We want to clean

federal and state, should all get
together and get behind this.
We'll begin with cooperatives.
It's farmland. Not very good land,
I understand, but we are creative
people, we will be able to do
something with what we get. We
just want something to call our
own.''
Carson said the idea came to

uespite Propoi

I

PITTSBURGH (P - Striking
steel haulers served notice yester-
day that a proposed peace pact
hadn't ended their tumultuous,
two-month walkput. Strike break-
ing rigs were fired at and stoned
from Chicago to Pittsburgh.

several people because of the In Ohio, a group of drivers
about to vote on the proposals
troubles of Brooklyn CORE. tra- hammered out Tuesday by a sev-
ditionally an active, militant en-state mediation panel jumped
chapter. up and left when they heard some
World News Roundup

trucks
by stee
Mike
strike
1,000 m
around
Tube p
men bl
empty
Thre
one fir
vania I
bullets
hurt.
Willi
and ot
peatedl
Kusley
the ag
said th
engine
panies
"The;

were moving out of a near- Teamsters Union officials in
l plant. Pittsburgh approved the pact, but
Boano, a Youngstown i acting national President Frank
leader, said , half of the Fitzsimmons said in Miami he had
nen poured into the streets nothing to say to the press, now or
the Youngstown Sheet and ever.
lant gates. Police said the One group of truckers-repre-
ocked trucks and stoned an senting 50 firms-set a meeting
one. immediately to vote on the pact.
e trucks were stoned and But the 68-member National Steel
'ed on along the Pennsyl- Carriers Association said it
Turnpike. Two were hit by wouldn't be able to vote before
near Chicago. No one was Saturday.
The strike had claimed one life
am Kusley of Gary. Ind., as well as a score of injuries when
her strike leaders have re- the mediators representing gov-
y deplored the violence. ernors from seven states drafted
said he was happy with the pact in Pittsburgh during a
reement, but the strikers t wo-day session.
ey aren't kicking over an A tentative greement was reach-
until the trucking com- ed between the Teamsters and
agree to the settlement. strikers nearly two weeks ago, but
re's non oint in havin the independents turned it down

Daily-Richard S. Lee
PAX' MARKS THE SPO'T
The "torch of peace" is carried down State Street as Ann Arbor citizens demonstrate against the
war in Vietnam after a rally on the Diag yesterday. The torch is on its way to Washington, D.C.
for a huge anti-war march on Oct. 21.
FURTHERS DECLINE:
Death of Guevara Weakens
Castroism in Latin America

ourselves out spiritually, get away By The Associated Press
from this disease that the power WASHINGTON -Speaker John
structure has become. W. McCormack lashed out at Viet-
"We want to get away from nam war dissenters yesterday and
these cold, cold ghettoes. Not drew a standing ovation from
only the temperature, but the House members of both parties.
cold, calculating exploitation that In a speech to the House, Mc-
1leaves our brothers and sister nar- Cormack quoted Vo Nnguyen Giap,
cotics addicts, winos, drunkards the North Vietnamese defense
and prostitutes." minister, as saying U.S. dissent
Carson, 5 feet 8 and powerfully represents "a valuable mark of
built, "black and bearded like sympathy for North Vietnam."
my ancestors," says he and 300 While he said he does not ques-
follwers will leave quietly, but tion the right of dissent, McCor-
hardly in dispirited defeat. mack said those who do criticize
Evacuation plans have not no- in and out of Congress, should
ticeably disrupted routin in I'consider their responsibility in
CORE'S storefront office on busy doing so.
Nostrand Avenue, where what-
ever is being done is constantly JAKARTA, Indonesia - Acting
interrupted .by two insistent tele- President Suharto shook up his
phones and a constant stream of Cabinet yesterday to give himself
visitors. greater powers, dismissing nine of

that relations with Britain are de-
teriorating because of what he
called Britain's "flirt" with Egyp-
tian President Gamal Abdel Nas-
ser.
He said that Britain "is causing
us a lot of trouble at the United
Nations." Other Israeli sources
said that Britain was pressing for
an unconditional Israeli withdraw-
al from areas occupied in the.June
5-10 fighting, without the direct
Israel-Arab peace negotiations de-
manded by Israel.
In London, there was no imme-
diate British comment on the Is-
raeli statement.
VATICAN CITY-A Congress of
2,500 Roman Catholic laymen
seeking a greater role in their
Church opened yesterday andwas
told to consider its week-long
meeting "a prolonged love-in."
The congress took the focus of
attention away from the 13-day-
old meeting of the laymen's spirit-
ual leaders at the Catholic synod
of bishops, who are groping with
new aspects of their own role in
the church.

11,'10 o Liu livid(, 41 1 115i
meetings until we hear what the 9- 1
companies are going to do." said They said they wanted the
David Haugh of Pittsburgh. Teamsters to reopen negotiations.

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
AP News Analysis
Even before Bolivia announced
the death of Ernesto Che Guevara,
the Castroist movement in Latin
America was gasping for breath.
Convincing proof that Che is gone
f can be a blow from which the ex-
port brand of Castroism may never
recover.
If Castroism had a symbol in
Latin America, it was not Fidel
Castro himself, but Che Guevara.
Che was one of a disappearing
breed, the professional revolution-
ary, apostle of guerrilla war and
incessant violence, prototype of
the romantic underground con-
spirator whose appeal primarily
was to the young.
There are not many aspiring
Ches left in Latin America.
Pictures of the body of the fallen
Che are convincing evidence,,and
it will be difficult for the revolu-
tionaries to dispute them. For the
guerrillas in Bolivia as elsewhere,
the symbol of their revolutionary
hopes has been snatched away.
The movement, without its knight
in armor, easily loses its luster.
Castroism already was becoming
a negligible force outside Cuba.
Indeed, Che himself personified its
weaknesses. He was the standard-
bearer for what Fidel Castro had

represented years ago, but certain-
ly not for what Castro became.
There is reason to believe, in fact,
that Che had broken with his one-
time "maximum leader."
If the final chapter of the Gue-
vara saga means the decline of
the guerrilla movement, Fidel Cas-
tro can lay much of the blame
upon himself. His failures brought
Castroism into disrepute and the
Communist movemest to confu-
sion.
Castro began the process soon
after he reached power by turning
on heroes of his own revolution:
Huber Matos, Camilo Cienfuegos,
Anibal Escalante and many an-
other. At the same time, the econ-
omic confusion reigning in Cuba
dulled much of the glitter of Cas-
tro as a champion of the people.
He soon mortgaged himself to

Moscow and owed his very ex-
istence to the Soviet Communists.
Meanwhile, the Soviet Union
was finding it more profitable to
rely on traditional means of in-
fluence and infiltration in Latin
Amei'ica and was cautiously shying
away from overt connection with
guerrilla and terrorist violence.
Castroism lost important support.
Castro himself frequently gave
vent to his bitterness on this score.
But probably a more serious blow

I

to Castro's hopes was his own fall-
ing out with the Che Guevara.
That came in the spring of 1965,
after Guevara had made a trip to
Red China and Africa.
Guevara palpably had been un-
happy about Soviet interference in
the Latin-American revolutionary
movement in the wake of 1962
Cuban missile crisis showdown
with the United States.
In 1963, he wrote an article in-
sisting it would be an "unpardon-
able error" to neglect armed
struggle. Probably Castro felt the
same way, but he relied wholly on
Moscow. Summoned there in 1964,
Castro got the full treatment and
later appeared to compromise with
the cautious view. Guevara took
off for Peking and then Africa.
He returned to Havana in March
1965. All the evidence indicates he
had a violent row with Castro,
then. Che disappeared, and Castro'
said- he was on a revolutionary
mission elsewhere.
Tonight & Friday
The Music Room,
dir. Satyajit Ray, 1958
The great Indian
director presents
Chekhou's tale, with
music by
Ravi Shankar.
From the director
of THE APU TRILOGY
"Each of his works is a
version of perfection."
-TIME magazine
7:00 & 9:05
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
, STILL ONLY 50c m

A sign in the front window gives
the only clue: "Black Power
Means Land. Help us acquire this
by donating $1."
Brooklyn CORE has put a down'
payment on 100 acres of land,
Carson said, and hopes to settle
on it by spring. He won't say
where it is, other than it's "out-
side the north." It's "where our
people are," and it's "close to
Africa." All that makes the South
the most likely location.

Suharto announced that he had
rearranged the structure of the
military to put it under his direct
command. He retained the port-
folio of defense minister.
He added that changes in the
Cabinet were necessary because
the Parliament elections scheduled
for 1968 could not be held on time,
but did not elaborate. Informants
said it was unlikely elections could
be held for at least two years.

hi

"We need more, much more," he JERUSALEM-An official Is-
said. "We think the governments, raeli spokesman said yesterday

is 23 ministers.

NOW SHOWING
"AN EXTREMELY EROTIC MOVIE!"
--Playboy Magazine
"EACH SCENE A WORK OF ART."
- Cue Magazine

Presented by act & The Research Association
for Michigan Negro History, Inc.
"SIMPLE" Speaks His Mind in

Ir

ir

11

presents the 3rd annual
HUMPHREY BOGART
Film Festival!
Beautiful Bogie in-
FRIDAY-The Big Sleep
Casblanca
SATURDAY-The Petrified Forest
The Maltese Falcon
SUNDAY-All Through the Night
Treasure of the Sierra Madre
double features-starting at 8 P.M:-$1.50
with FREE FOOD

EXCLUSIVELY ONI WWarner Brothers Records
Lansing Civic Center
SUN., OCT. 15, 7:30 P.M.
Tickets:
$4.50, $3.50, $2.50, $2.00
Mail orders:
Civic Center Box Office
505 W. Allegan
East Lansing, Michigan
Detroit Masonic Temple
500 Temple
SUN., OCT. 29, 8:00 P.M.
Tickets:
$5.00, $4.00, $3.00, $2.00
Mail orders: Include self-
addressed, stamped envelope.

IA E KTTERLING'S
Starring
INGRID'
Nig9ht GamesIGD
THULIN
7:00, 9:15-Mon.-Thurs.
7:00,9:15, 11:30-Fri. & Sat.
6:00,18:15, 10:30-Sun.

A DRAMATIC PRODUCTION WITH MUSIC

Directed by POWELL LINDSAY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, at 8:00 P.M.
TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM
Huron at State
Tickets $1.00 & $2.00 at Auditorium Box Office
open thropgh Friday 12 to 3, & 5 to 7 P.M.
and an Saturday 12 to 5, & 6 to 8 P.M.

' -,

01

I

IN

UNION-LEAGUE

AE
UNION-LEAGUE

HOMECOMING '67

presents
THE SIXTH ANNUAL
DANCE FESTIVAL
Three Performances in Hill Auditorium
HARKNESS BALLET . . . . . . .. Fri.,dOct. 13,8:30
Program: Night Song; Feast of Ashes; Zealous Variations (Schubert, Op. 83) ; and
Time Out of Mind
OLAETA BASQUE FESTIVAL . . . . Sun.,Od.22 830
Dancers, singers, and instrumentalists combine to provide dances and music of the
Basque country-seven provinces on both sides of the Pyrenees, both in Spain and in
France
JOSE MOLINA BAILES ESPANOLES... Fri., Oct. 21,8:30
Program of Spanish songs and "ancing, including folk, classical, and f"amenco

HOMECOMING '67

presents

I

presents

THE DOORS

with

THE RAMSEY LEWIS TRIO

The Long Island Sound

and

BUFFY SAINTE-MARIE

Fri Oct. 20
.M. Bld
9 12 3 IIv Iiv. "'

0

lki t""/"%kl " dT

II

III

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