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October 11, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-11

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WEDNESDAY, .OCTOBER 11, 1967

THE 311CHIGA3'1 DAILY

PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1967 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

0
Soviet
'Defense
To Bolster
Arab States,
SNorth Viet
World Tension Cause ,
Of 15 Per Cent Hike
Over Previous Budget
MOSCOW (A') - The Soviet
t Union announced yesterday one of
the biggest increases in defense
spending in its history to bolster
North Vietnam and to aid Arab
nations.
Finance Minister Vasily F. Gar-
buzov told Parliament a 15 'per
cent increase was necessary be-
cause "international tension de-
mands increased attention to our
defenses."
Then he said that the Soviet
Union firmly supports "the Viet-'
namese people in their struggle
against the criminal aggression of
American imperialism" and "the
just struggle of the people of Arab
countries against aggressive ac- CUBAN REVO
tions of Israel, against its im fers with Fidel
perialist patrons." to lead revolut
Largest Since 1961 firmed the deal
The defense increase, largest
annqunced since the Berlin crisis miISSISSI
of 1961, will bring publicly dis-
closed defense spending to $18.6
billion, 13.5 per cent of the 1968 U
budget. U S
About half of actual Soviet
military spending is believed by
Western analysts to be hidden II
under other budgetary headings. f
The published defense budget is
primarily a reflection of political
trends, these analysts say. MERIDIAN, M
The United States spent $6 bil- government beg
lion for defense this fiscal year pyramid of evide
and President Johnson has asked trial of 18 men c
for $72.3 billion for 1967-68. spiracy in the
three young civi
Emphasize Support in the backwood
Western observers suggested the phia, Miss.
Soviet increase for 1968 might be Justice Depar
primarily intended to emphasize may later produ
Soviet support for North Vietnam tricC Court key I
and for Arab losers in the Middle paid informers. 1
East war last June. regarded as thet
In the past, Soviet foreign mil- against the 18 w
A itary aid was not mentioned in including a Ku H
budget reports and was believed tan and three1
hidden in the budget. Now, the officers.
observers suggested, it might be All are charge
coming into the public figures for cy to violate thet
political reasons. ers' civil rights.
Garbuzov said the Soviet Union Broade
will also increase its defense capa- In the secondd
city. the prosecution b
The Soviet Union has sent hun- with witnesses r
dreds of millions of dollars worth Neshoba County
of weapons to the defeated Arab ment clerk to th
countries, Egypt and Syria. jail.
New Viet Aid A jail docket f
of 1964 was ent
Last month it signed a 1968 aid It contained the
agreement with North Vietnam ael Schwerner, 2
which it hinted was larger than man, 20, both w
the current one-estimated by and James Cha
Washington to involve a billiondinNgo
dollars this year. dhan Negro.
Chaney had b
Garbuzov spoke at the opening speeding and the
of the Supreme Soviet, the Parlia- on the ledger "
ment which officially approves gation."
decisions already taken within the Mildred Herr
Communist party. with her husba
The budget is expected to re- county jail, test
ceive unanimous approval when the three were lo
thersession closes, probably to- they "caused no
morrow. Late that nig

1~_-

Tion Raises
Expenditure

Bolivia Says
Army Killed
Che Guevara
Government Message
Affirms Battle Death;
Military Log Seized
LA PAZ, Bolivia (A)-A military
communique said yesterday it had
been confirmed that Ernesto Che
Guevara was killed in battle Sun-
day and his military campaign
log seized.
Six other guerrillas were killed
in the fighting with army rangers
near Higueras in the southeast
jungles, including three Cubans,
the communique said.
The body of the former chief
lieutenant of Prime Minister Fidel
Castro of Cuba was taken to the
nearby town of Vallegrande, 300
miles southeast of La Paz, the
communique added.
View Body
Gen. Alfredo Ovando Candia,
commander in chief of the armed
forces, and Gen. David Lafuente,
commander of the army, flew to
Vallegrande to view the body.
Press reports from the scene
said Guevara was shot near the
heart and in the legs with ma-
chine-gun fire.
The battle broke out about four
miles north of Higueras Sunday
afternoon. It raged for five hours
in the jungles.
Guevara led the guerrilla forces
in the Sierra Maestra mountains
of-eastern Cuba in the Castro up-
rising that led to the overthrow of
President Fulgencio Batista in
January of 1959.

COMMITTEE HEARING:
McNamara Testimony Denies
Need To Bomb, Mine Haiphong

WASHINGTON (M)--Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara's
insistence that bombing or mining
Haiphong, main supply port of
North Vietnam, will not shorten
the war or cut off enemy supplies
was underlined in testiiony made
public yesterday.
McNamara made it clear that
he plans to continue restricted
bombing of North Vietnam.
He testified Aug. 25 before the
Senate preparedness, subcommit-
tee and publication of his testi-
mony follows that of several un-
informed military chiefs urging
the mining or bombing of Hai-
phong.
Earlier Excerpts
The subcommittee earlier made
public excerpts of McNamara's
testimony which played down the
importance of Haiphong, saying
supplies could be brought in over
the beach if it were knocked out.
Both he and President Johnson
insist that the differences be-
tween the military and civilian
chiefs on the question are slight.
In the testimony made public
yesterday, McNamara, in heated
exchanges with members of the
subcommittee, made a string of
denials to senators' questions and
suggestions..
No Loss Reduction
It denied that heavier or earlier
bombing attacks on the North
would have reducediU.S. casual-
ties in the sporadic but bitter
ground war in the South.
McNamara also agreed - that
there has been no change in the
basic bombing pattern, even
though numerous targets have
been authorized for first strikes
rcently.
He also denied that he is fol-
lowing a "no-win policy" or that
U.S. forces might as well "throw
up their hands" and get out.

But the Pentagon chief said he
knows of no way to do this mili-
tarily or politically.
McNamara estimated that last
year Russia supplied North Viet-
nam with about $60 million in aid
while Communist China provided
about $150 million.
Near the end of the testimony
McNamara told Sen. Stuart Sym-
ington (D-Mo): "I don't believe

there is this gulf between the mil-
itary leaders and the civilian lead-
ers in the executive branch."
"The area of controvery that
we have been dealing with deals
wit a very, very, tiny part of the
total air war in the North, and
this is why the chiefs and I feel
there is no great gap between the
military leaders and civilian lead-
ers," he added.

National News Roundup

By The Associated Press
JUNEAU, Alaska - A Japan-
ese merchant ship was reported
today to have rescued at least two
of the 42 crewmen who leaped in-
to the North Pacific Ocean when
their ship, the Panoceanic Faith,
sank suddenly Monday.
The fate of the 40 other men
was not known. There were fears
they could not survive long in the
cold, storm-tossed waters.
* * *
PHILADELPHIA - Four alleged
members of the Revolutionary
Action Movement (RAM) charg-
ed with plotting to assassinate
public officials and poison thou-

sands of policemen were ordered
held for grand jury action yes-
terday.
Judge Leo Weinrott set ball at
$25,000 each after a sometimes
noisy hearing that lasted two
days.
Bound over were Edward H. Su-
per, 25, Anthony B. Monteira, 21,
William Lyles, 26, and Reginald
Grantham, 19, all of Philadelphia.
The four yesterday were charg-
ed specifically with plotting to
start a race riot in Philadelphia
last summer and then, during the
ensuing confusion, slip potassium
cyanide into coffee served police
on riot duty.

Associated Press
LUTIONARY CHE GUEVARA, right, reported killed in battle in Bolivia Sunday, con-
Castro in 1959, when he was Castro's top lieutenant. Guevara disappeared in 1965
ions elsewhere, according to Castro. A Bolivian army communique yesterday con-
th of Guevara and six other revolutionaries in southeast Bolivia.

[PPI TRIAL:
Opens Case Ag(
rged in '64 Trip

liss. (A') - The
'an building a
nce today in the
lharged with con-
1964 slaying of
1 rights workers
s near Philadel-
tment attorneys
ace in U.S. Dis-
nformation from
This testimony is
heart of the case
white defendants,
Klux Klan chief-
law enforcement
;d with conspira-
three slain work-
n Case .
day of testimony,
roadened its case
anging from the
sheriff's depart-
e operator of the
rom the summer
ered as evidence.
names of Mich-
4, Andrew Good-
hite New Yorkers
ney, ?1, a Men-
been booked for
other two were
hold for investi-
ng, who along
rd operates the
ified that when
dged behind bars
trouble."
;ht, the govern-

m e n t maintains, Schwerner,
Goodman and Chaney were re-
leased, then shot to death on a
country road near Philadelphia.
Their deaths attracted world-
wide attention during the long
summer of civil rights turmoil in
this deep South state.
Accuse Klan
Asst. U.S. Atty. Gen. John
Doar, the Justice Department's
chief civil rights troubleshooter,
told an all-white jury of seven I
women and five men Monday that
the slayings were plotted by the
militant White Knights of the Ku
Klux Klan.
A Klan chieftain, Sam Hollo-
way Bowers, Jr., Imperial Wizard
of the White Knights, is among
the defendants, as are Price'sI
boss, Neshoba County Sheriff
Lawrence Rainey, and the sher-
iff-elect, Ethel Glen "Hop" Bar-
nette.
Mrs. Herring said Price cameI
back 'to the jail shortly after 10
p.m., some four hours afterthe
arrest of the three men, and said:
Chaney wanted to pay off the:
fine. Chaney, she said, borrowed
$20 from Schwerner and gave itt
to Price.-
The state never filed murder
charges in the deaths and federal
authorities can not prosecute un-
der murder charges unless the
crime took place on federal pro-
perty.
Specifically, the 18 are on trial

Disappeared in 1965
Guevara's whereabouts had
been a question since he disap-
peared from Cuba in April of
1965, to lead revolutions else-
i1 where according to Castro.
Guevara had been reported kill-
ed in the Dominican Republic up-
g Irising later that year.
Other accounts placed him in
various parts of Latin America.
under a 97-year-old Reconstruc- Bolivian army reports insists
tion era law. The indictment said he slipped into Bolivia in late
they conspired together to "in- February or early March this year
jure, oppress, threaten and in- and went under the name of Ra-
timidate" Schwerner, Chaney and man or Fernando.
Goodman. The son of an Argentine couple,
Conviction could bring a maxi- Guevara was no stranger to Bo-
mum sentence of 10 years in pri- livia. He spent several months in
son and a $5,000 fine. southeast Bolivia in 1954.
UNCLE RUSS PRESENTS

-
i
r
.
1 ' '

TONIGHT AT
7r fE Ak,
1421 HILL STREET
8:30 P.M.
A HOOT!-with Dave Siglin, Bob White, Sara Melton, Bob Franke,
Noel Saxe, and many others. 50c
Bring an instrument and/or sing along.
Thursday-A PANEL ON POT-with-JOHN ROSEVEAR,
author of Pot, a Handbook of Marijuana
EUGENE STAUDENMAIER-Detective Lieutenant of the Ann
Arbor Police Department
DR. ALBERT F. SCHNEIDER-Pathology professor at Wayne
State Medical School.
Friday & Saturday-BOB WHITE-(from San Diego, California)
returns-singing ballads, children's songs and folk music, playing
guitar, banjo, and AUTOHARP. (Bob did the Woody Guthrie Folk-
in at the Ark with Will Geer) and will do one set in memory of
Woody Guthrie.
-7

i
I
E
s
r
!
I
t
I
I
E

DIRECT FROM ENGLAND
THE CRE AM
IN DANCE CONCERT
Also Co-Starring:
THE THYME ... Oct. 13
THE RATIONALS ... Oct. 14 & 15
THE APOSTLES ... Oct. 15
MC-5 . . . Oct. 13 & 15

Tomorrow & Friday
THE.
MUSIC ROOM
dir Satyajit Ray, 1958
From the director of
The Apu Trilogy.
"Each of his works is a
version of perfection."
--TIME magazine
Saturday & Sunday
MARIUS TRILOGY
PART III:, CESAR
,7:00 & 9:05
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
STILL ONLY 50c.

UNION-LEAGUE

PETITION
FOR

GENERAL CHAIRMAN
of
International World's Fair
Petitions will be available in
UAC off ices-2nd floor, UNION
Oct. 9-Oct. 13-3-5 P.M.
Petitions are due Friday, Oct. 20

FRI. & SAT. 8 P.M.-1 A.M.

SUN. 6-9 P.M.

TICKETS AVAILABLE:
J. L. HUDSON, GRINNELLS, and
DISCOUNT RECORDS (S.U. STORE)

GRANDE BALLROOM
Grand River at Joy Rd.

-

wlm

II

TONIGHT THRU SUNDAY!

Who Should Decide
Conduct Regulations?
"Resolved: that the Board of Governors dele-
gate to I.H.A. the right to make individual con-
duct regulations with the mandate that they
actively solicit advice and counsel to faculty,
administration, and student organizations."
INTERESTED?
Attend the open meeting of the Board of Gover-
nors at 3:00. But first, discuss your opinions with
friends and especially with the faculty. Write
letters or call.
Dr. Frank Braun--764-5397
r Fnrl 1Rrittnn--~764-1421

U.

- ic .-_;..

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