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October 06, 1967 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-06

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PAGE SIX

TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1967

PAGE IX TE MICIG-N-AI-

__

Ir

WHAT'S
GOING ON HERE?
Home
764-0558

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
falendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
inlormation call 764-9270.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6
Day Calendar
Medical Center Alumni Society Con-
ference 1967-Clinical Conferences: 9
to 11:30 a.m. Society Programs, North
Campus Commons, 1:15 to 3:10 p.m..
Information Center, Room 7330, Sev-
enth Level, Medical Science Bldg.
Major Sesquicentennial Celebration-
Voices of Civilization-Luncheon for
participants and wives: Michigan
League, 12:30 p.m.; Convocation, speak-
er-Harlan Hatcher, president, Univer-

sity of Michigan: Rackham Lecturel
Hall, 2:30 p.m.
Astronomical Colloquium-Prof. M.
Minnaert, Utrecht, The Netherlands,
"The Organization of Practical Work
in General Astronomy": Room 807 Phys-
ics.-Astronomy Bldg., today, 4:30 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program - Luigi
Pirandello's "Right You Are": LydiaI
Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.

j

University Players Dept. of Speech -
William Shakespeare's "King John":I
Trueblood Aud., 8 p.m.
General NoticesI
All Students in the School of Educa-
tion (Undergraduate): Preclassification
for the Winter Term (II) 1968 is in
progress. It will end on Dec. 4. The
material may be obtained in Room 2000$
UHS. Students should register early.
Concert Dance Organization and De-
partments of Speech and Art Concert:
Marguerite Lundgren-Harwood, Euryth-
mist, "The Art of Eurythmy": Barbour
Gymnasium, Sat., 8 p.m.
French and German Preliminary Ob-
jective Test: The Preliminary Objective
Test in French and German adminis-
tered by the Graduate School for doc-
toral candidates is scheduled for Thurs.,
Nov. 9 from 7 to 9 p.m., in the Natural
Science Aud. ALL students planning
to take the test must register by 4
p.m. Nov. 9 at the Information Desk

in the lobby of the Rackham Bldg. For exper. in publishing or teaching Journ. \
further information call the Informa- or Engi. at college level.
tion Desk, 764-4415. Ayerst Laboratories, Inc., Rouses Pt.,
N.Y.-Openings for degrees and little
Lecture: Prof. Ralph A. Leigh, of or no exper. in fields of Chem.. Opth-
Trinity College, Cambridge. will lecture almics, Formulations, Pharma., Engi-
on Mon., Oct. 9 at 4:10 p.m., in Aud. neering.
A, Angell Hall, on the subject "Les Archer Daniels Midland Co., Minne-
Liaisons Dangereuses." apolis, Minn.-Operations Research An-
alyst, Mktg., forecasting and produc-
Parking Notice: Repairs will begin tion duties, BS in Phys. Sd. and MS
on the Church Street Parking Struc- in Math or Econ. MBA strong i ltin-
ture top deck causing some spaces to dergrad sci. also. 2-4 yrs, exper. pref.
be blocked off during October and Rohm and Haas Co., Phila., Pa.-PhD
November. Chem., Organic. PhD Physical Chem.,
Staff paid spaces are available in BS MS Chem., ChE PhD. BS/MS ChE.
the Thompson Street Parking Struc- BSME, openings in all plant capaci-
ture. ties, several locations.
Airec, Ohio Medical Products, Madi-
Parking Office: Effective Mon., Oct. son, Wis.-Systems Anal., Bus. degree, ca
9, the restrictions in staff lot E-12 some exper. Methods & Planning Engr.. ch
will be extended from 6 a.m.-10 p.m.. BSIE or ME and 1-3 yrs. exper. Product sa
Monday through Friday. En'er., BSEE pus 3 years.
Colgate University, Hamilton, N.Y.- tra
TV Center Program: 12 noon, WWJ- MA Program in College Student Per- Ve
TV, Channel-'"8he Canterbury Tales. sonnet Admin., Counseling and Guid.
The Prioress' Tale." The Prioress tells with Grad resident advisor stipend,
of a devout young boy and a miracle Men only, fellowships for MA in aca-
of the Virgin. The tale is dramatized, demic fields for those qualified for
followed by the commentary of Prof. college teaching. Applications at Bu- di
Thomas Garbaty. reau. for
Standard Oil Co. (Ohio), Cleveland, tin
Doctoral Examination for Glenn Ohio-Openings for inexperienced per-to
Hearn Jones. Social Psychology ;thesis: sonnel. Oper. Anal., Mktg. Res., Mgmt.
"Social Correlates of Interpersonal Con- Trng., Mktg. Trng., ChE, ME. Exper- 7
trol," Fri., Oct. 6, in Room 6006 ISR ienced personnel openings, Procure- ex
(small conference room), at 9 a.m. ment Syst., Admin. Asst., Plastics Engr.,
Chairman, R. L. Kahn. Methods & Standards Anal., Tax Anal., pe
Auditing, Securities, Chemists, ChE, pr
ME, Sales, Agronomist, Patent Atty., pla
P tPsychologist, Software Spec., Systems
Anal. and des., Programmers.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:x* * *
Procter and Gamble-Will interview For further information please call pr
for sales positions at School of Bus. 764-7460, General Division, Bureau of ea
Ad. on Thurs., Oct. 10. Call 764-1372 for Appointments, 3200 SAB. gr
appointments.
FSEE (Federal Service Entrance Exam- WI
i iUiI )-Nav U 0""1I. ina ll jJnarindnU o j

TEW APPROACH:
Hoffman- Describes
UNDP Aid Program
By JIM NEUBACHER
and JILL CRABTREE
"The whole attitude of Ameri-
ns toward foreign aid has
anged in the past 20 years,"
id Paul G. Hoffman, adminis-
ator of the United Nations De-
lopment Program (UNDP) in
interview yesterday. .

4

Daily Classifieds Get Results

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Miss J swings to
rhythmic simplicity
in linear wool knit dresses
for day or night. . .designed
by Act I with young belts for a
hint of waistline. Sizes 3P to 13P.
A. Block sharpens white under
tab belts front and bock. 26.00
B. Loop belt crosses cowl

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ination)-Next application perilod closes
Oct. 11. next Wed. This will qualify
you to take the test on Nov. 18. Mgmt.
Intern exam will be given the after-
noon of same day. All Dec. grads are
urged to take this exam, processing
applications takes time.
National Security Agency-Applica-
tions for the first test are due Oct.
11. Test on Oct. 21. Another test in
Dec. Dec. grads should take the Oct.
test, however.
Public Service Commission of Canada
-Test for Public Service and Foreign
Service will be given evening of Oct. 17.
Please contact Bureau if interested.
Sat., Oct. 7-3529 SAB, 9-10 a.m.,
representatives from Canadian Public
Service Commission and Consulate in
Detroit will be talking to students
interested in careers with Canadian
governmgnt.
POSITION OPENINGS:
University of Delaware, Master of Ed-
ucation in College Counseling or Stu-
dent Personnel Administration - 33
sem. hours. Direc.torships in residence
halls with stipend.
National Security Agency - Grad
studies program for Electronic Engrs..
Mathematicians. Engineering Physicists
at universities in and around the
Wash.-Baltimore area. Two semesters
within three years of employment.
Fideler Depth-Study Textbooks, Grand
Rapids, Mich.-Textbook editor, manu-
script procurement, sr. design and ex-
ecutive position, 38 yrs. or younger.
'_I LAST I

ORGAN IZATION1
NOTICE-'S
USF OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
I:mn. 1011 CAB.
* * *
Unitarian Universalist Student Reli-
gious Liberals: Allan Schvaiberg, Dept.
of Sociology, and others in Sociology
Dept., will speak on "The Population
Problem and Some Possible Changes,"
followed by discussion from the audi-
ence, Sun., Oct. 8, 7:30 p.m., at the
First Unitarian Church, 1917 Washte-
naw.
* * *
La Sociedad Hispanica, Una Reunion,
Mon., Oct. 9, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
UM Chess Club is organizing for the
tournament, Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m., 3C Un-
ion.
Baha'i Student Group, there will be
no meeting this Friday.
Hillel Foundation, Rosh Hashana Ser-
vices, Oct. 6, 9:30 a.m., Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
Guild House, Friday noon luncheon
discussion: "Tactics and Strategies of
Vietnam Fall," Oct. 6, 12-1 p.m., Guild
House, 802 Monroe; also international
dinner (South America), Oct. 6, 6 p.m.
For reservations call 662-5189.
TV RENTALS
$10 PER MONTH
FREE service and delivery
N EJ AC TV
RENTALS
662-5671

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"Today there is considerable
senchantment with American
reign aid programs," he con-
nued. "People expect too much
o soon."
The reason for this, Hoffman
plained, is that the American
ople expect every foregn aid
ogram to be another Marshall
an. He said that although the
arshall plan was a tremendous
ccess, it was "simply a recovery
ogram," and therefore much
sier to carry out than a pro
am designed to create prosperity
here it had never before existed.
In the early days of his own
ogram, Hoffman said, "there
as a general overestimation of
e role external assistance could
ay in a development program."
he UNDP has since discovered
at extensive knowledge of na-
ve customs and tradions must
gained before the effectiveness
specific assistance programs
n be honestly judged, he said.
Hoffman, who started out work-
g in the sales office of a Los
n g 1 e s automobile franchise,
orked his way up to become
iairman of the boar dof Stude-
aker-Packard corporation.
As administrator of the Mar-
ali Plan and later president of
e Ford Foundation, he became
nown for his work in the field
social and economic develop-
ent.
In 1956, Hoffman said, he was
afted by his personal friend
enry Cabot Lodge, at that time
merican ambassador to the UN,
become a UN delegate. As a
legate, he became interested in
.e idea of a capital investment
ogram, an issue hotly disputed
the UN at that time. He saw
.e need for making investment
nds available to low-income
ountries.
Hoffman questioned delegates
om such countries about native
atural resources and their utili-
.tion. When most of the dele-
ates told him that theirs were
imarily agricultural countries,
e asked if they had ever made
soil survey to determine if
hey were using the land to its
ll potenial. The answers to this
nd to questions about the exis-
nce of skilled manpower were
oth negative.
He concluded that the develop-
ent of low-income countries
ould best be achieved though
entification and utilization of
ative resources and establish-
ent of self-rlun training and
search programs.

w
4

Paul Hoffman
Today as the director of the
UNDP, Hoffman continues to fol-
low this philosophy in shaping
the direction and goals of aid
programs.
He went on to say that the
UNDP helps low-income coun-
tries by assisting them to identify
their natural resources, by help-
ing them to train their people
in effective use of these re-
sources, and by aid them in the
establishment of applied research
facilities.
"We try to determine the prior-
ities, and find out where the
power lies in the country. We
search for resources that can be
capitalized upon to provide an)
immediate source of revenue.
These revenues are then used to
finance long-range projects such
as introducing the study of
science into the schools at all
levels.
Hoffman said that the United
Nations has certain basic advan-
tages that don't apply in any
bilateral aid program."
He explained that the primary
differences between UN and Uni-
ted States aid programs lies in
the fact that UN aid has only
one objective, to develop and
better the economy of the recip-
ient nation. He said that in con-
trast individual countries often
have ulterior motives in giving
aid, such as increasing foreign
trade or improving diplomatic
relations.
Hoffman f e lt international
agencies are unusually qualified
to make or deny aid on its fin-
ancial and development merits
alone.

4

CHANCE
All Kinds of Books
& Records & Magazines
& Art Objects & Things
ALL CHEAP
Sponsored by
A.A.U.W.
S.A. B.-9-2

I

.. - -

collared dre!

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<8

F

War Research Committee
and others interested
Meeting TODAY at NOON in the
MUG, 2nd room, to discuss proposals
for October 17 general meeting.
Topic: Ending war research
at the U. of Michigan
Position and strategy papers wanted
to print in the first Newsletter
before October 17.

li

UNION-LEAGUE

CONTROVERSY 67
presents

LI

BISHOP JAMES PIKE

U

I

TONIGHT & SATURDAY ONLY!

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 11 ... 8 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM

I

MUSKET '68
Announces open petitioning for
COSTUMER
Petitions in Musket office,
Michigan Union, 2nd 'floor

I

DUE OCTOBER 9

I

i.

I

UNION-LEAGUE
"FOR EVERYTHING THERE IS A

a . . LL- WAI 1 % DfLI'C Ifl .-9U

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