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September 28, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-28

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, EPTE ER 28,1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, SEPTE1~IIBER 28. 1967

cinema
Eastern European Films Shine at Festival;
Slavic Cinema Leads Modern Renaissance

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
first in a three-part series on
the 1967 New York Film Festi-
val and Andy Warhol.
BY ANDREW LUGG
NEW YORK - A number of
films by young Czech directors,
notably Milos Forman, generated
a great deal of excitement at last
year's New York Film Festival.
In these films, particularly in
Forman's "Loves of a Blonde," we
witnessed a type of East Euro-
peani cinema that differed from
the propagandistic war films that
we had seen up to that time.
Even the wax films, themselves,
(think of "Shop on Main Street")
had no "drum-beating" and in-
stead investigated the intricacies
and incongruities of war.
This was no flash in the pan,
since there has been a festival in
New York of some 20 modern
Czech films that proved this
point.
At the 1967 Festival we see that
it is not just Czechoslovakia,
among the East European coun-

tries, that is experiencing a ren-
aissance in film production.
This year two Yugoslav films
and two by a young Polish direc-
tor, Jerzy Skolimowski, have al-
ready been screened and there is
still a Russian and a Hungarian
film to come.
Skolimowski's "Barrier" typifies
the new direction of East Euro-
pean films, and (with a little
luck) it should soon be on our
screens here.
Skolimowski deals with the
greys of Polish youth. The real-
ity he depicts is in no way dog-
matic; it is touched only briefly
by ideology. He deals with the
particular, suggesting, en route,
that there are many other similar
situations, but that these cannot
be approached through universal
slogans.
Indeed, he uses slogans con-
sistently, like newspaper headlines
in a manner that parodies the
presumptuousness of the old "uni-
versals." In this respect, Skoli-
mowski is like Jean Luc-Godard.
On the other hand, it is just as

easy to draw parallels between hisE
work and that of Fellini. He usess
baroque images, lace and all, in
order to take his protagonistsc
through a maze of dreams andI
hallucinations.
Skolimowski has redeemed the
pretentiousness of Fellini's film
language. He does this by incor-
porating elements of the grotes-I
que, by not taking himself too
seriously, by including Godard-like
anecdotes ("A woman was run
over by a tram as she tried to walkf
elegantly"), by knocking taboos
(the hero says to two nuns, "You
are not in bed yet, sisters." They
reply, "We are waiting for ther
Resurrection'") and by using aI
Bunuelian Hallelujah Chorus.
One of the slogans in the film
is the "romance of our cynicalI
generation" and this is what theI
film is about. We might describeF
the film as being a collection ofI
beautiful images that hint at this
slogan.
A year ago I almost 'came outt
and suggested that government
censorship is better than box of-
fice censorship. With the new,
spate of government-subsidized
East European films it seems ob-
vious that government support of
the arts is not only less damaging
to the film art than is the tyran-
ny of the box office but also is a
positive asset to commercial pro-
duction of films.
Although "Barrier" is a low
budget film, it is more expensive
than anything that an independ-
ent film-maker in this country
could envision making. Govern-
ment subsidy is a must. And after
all it is easier to rebel against a
few bureaucrats than it is to
overcome the lethargy of some 200
million souls.
I wish also to discuss Jean
Rouch's "The LionsHunters,"
which had its first showing in
America last Monday, although
it was made in 1965. It is partic-
ularly interesting in that it is a
magnificent indictment of the
techniques used in the film "Af-
rica Addio" that was shown in
Ann Arbor last summer.
My colleague who reviewed "Af-
rica Addio" did a good job of
showing the dishonesty of direc-
tor Jacopetti and his team. It is
not surprising that two of this
team are on trial in Italy for
starting a massacre. Jacopetti put
all his faith in blood and thunder,
spectacle. He set his Africans up
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as savages and not very glorious
ones at that.
Rouch works at the other end
of the spectrum. He has respect
for the inhabitants who live above
the Niger. He has the same sort
of respect that Radin has in his
"Primative Man as Philosopher."
He knows that a film-maker needs
to proceed as the anthropologist.
He works with the people; he does
not buy them off.
He is aware that his mere pres-
ence is likely to disturb the real-
ity of the situation.
Add to all this Rouch's hones-
ty. There are no trick shots. Rouch
shows the details, the prepara-
tions and the actual hunt which
culminates with the killing of the
lion. We see nothing that the
hunters do not see. Rouch always
keeps at a respectable distance
and in this way avoids "improv-
ing" the description of the hunt
that the hunters themselves get.
There is none of the studied ele-
gance of Disney in "Lion Hunt-
ers," but this does not mean that
the film is inelegant. The beauty
of the film resides in its honest
presentation. The camera jerks at
a crucial moment because there
is a human holding it and he is
not completely prepared: the "mo-
ment" had not been planned.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLE TIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
Day .Calendar
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Semlnar"Management of Be-
havior Change Seminar": Michigan
Union, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Dept. of Anatomy Seminar-Dr. Ar-
thur L. Foley, University of Michigan,
"DescendingcAutonomic Pathways":
2501 E. Medical Bldg., 1:15 p.m.
International Institution for Produc-
tion Engineering Research Conference
-"1967 Conference on Modern Manu-
facturing Technology": Morning ses-
sion, Rackham Lecture Hall, 9 a.m.;
discussion series, Fourth Floor, Rack-
ham Bldg., 1:30 p.m.
Student Relations Committee Meeting
-Open meeting, 3 p.m., 3529 SAB.
Thomas M. Cooley Lecture Series,
Lecture IV-Prof. Otto Kahn-Freund,
University of Oxford, "Private Power
and Legal Rituals": Room 100, Hutch-
ins Hall, 3:30 p.m.
Dept. of Chemistry-Physical Semi-
nar, "Caratheodory's Formulation of
Classical Thermodynamics," S. M. Blin-
der, Room 1200,. Chemistry Bldg., 5
p.m.

Mendelssonn Theatre, 8 p.m.
School of Music Concert - BaroqueI
Trio: Rackham Lecture Hall. 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
English Language Institute, Testing
and CertificatsonDivision, and the
Center for Research on Language and
Language Behavior: Seminar Confer-
ence on Testing English as a Second
Language. 9n am. morning sessions and
1:30 p.m. afternoon sessions, Sept. 28
to 30 in Basement Conference Room'
of City Center Bldg.
Applications for L.S. & A. Scholar-
ships: For the winter Term, 1968;
Spring-SummerTerm. 1968; Spring Half
Term, 1968, and Summer Half Term,
1968, will be available in Room 1220
Angell Hall beginning Oct. 2. Com-
pleted applications will be due no
later than Nov. 1. Applicants must
have at least one full semester of
residence in this college. Applicants
must have at least a 3.0 grade point
average. L.S. '& A. scholarships are
awarded on both need and scholarship;
need is the primary consideration.
Doctoral Candidates: Who expect to

Doctoral Examination for Guy Grah-
am Musser dZoology; thesis: ASys
Sy-tematic Study of the Mex\ican and Gua-
temalan Gray Squirrel, Sciurus Aureo-
ntaster F C.. i R d

Seminar--Seminar in Paul Tillich, receive degrees in December, 1967. Math, Psych., Soc. for Elec. Computing,
film and book discussion, Canterbury should turn in two bound and one un- Mktg. Res.
House, 330 Maynard St., 7:30 p.m. bound copies of their dissertations to TUES., OCT. 3-
_the dissertation secretary of the Gradu- Fireman's Fund American Insurance
Lecture: "Horse and Buggy Stories ate School by October 30. The report Cos., Detroit, ich.-All day. BA in
for Jet-Age Children," Robert Burch, of the doctoral committee on the final Gen. Lib. Arts for Insurance.
author. Sponsored by the School of oral examination must be filed with the Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Mich.
Education and the Department of Li- dissertation secretary of the Graduate -All day. Male &, female. BA/MA An-
brary Science. Thurs., Sept. 28, Rack- School, together with two copies of thro., Econ. & Biochem. for Comput-
ham Amphitheatre, 8 p.m. the dissertation-ready in all respects ing. Mktg. Res., Production, Public
for publication, not later than Mon., Relations. Purchasing, Sales, Stat.,
Professional Theatre Program-Michel a Nov. 27. Trans., Biol.. & Zoo.
del Ghelderode's "Pantagleize". Lydih

For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

I

ae r' .uuvUxer . 'aUnU1 : tjc), POSITION OPENINGS:
Thurs., Sept. 28, at 2009 Museum at . Omark Industries, Inc., Timber Har-
2 p.m. Chairman, E. T. Hooper. vesting Div., Milwaukie, Ore.-IE, recent
Doctoral Examination for David degree. Sr. IE. IE or ME plus 3 yrs.
Crockett Carey. Physics; thesis: --S exper. Supv., IE BSIE plus 2-3 yrs. supv.
6r Invariance in S-Wave Meson Barv- exper. and 5-10 yrs. high-volume metal
on Scattering," Thurs., Sept. 28, 629 product exper. Machine Des. Engr., ME
r P-A Bldg., at 3 p.m. Chairman, M. H. plus 3 yrs. des.exper. Design Engr.,
Ross. BSME plus 2yrs. Development Engr.,
BSME or AE, plus 3-5 yrs. Project Engr..
BSME plus 3-10 yrs. Qual. Assurance
PlacemientEngr., BBA or BA in Math or Phys.,
up to 5 yrs. exper. in QC.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Those Everett Bernardo & Co., Chicago, Ill.
wishing to interview the following em- -Sales Engineer, custom rubber and
ployers must have forms in the Bureau plastic products, some engrg, exper. re-
by the end of this week. Employers ex- quired.
pect to see this resume. Call 764-7460
for appointments, and come to General ocal Construction Co.-Construction
Division, 32002SAB, to get forms. Superintendent, supv. drafitng and
MON., OCT. 2- cons, of commercial apt. bldgs. Knowl.
Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, Ind. bldg. trades, ability to draft pref., BA/
-All day. Male & female. M & M or BS, man, some exper. in construction
PhD Math, Anal, and Organ, Chem., business.
Biochem., Microbiol, and Pharm. forb Dept. of Public Welfare, Ohio-Bu-
Biol. (Chem. required), Research, Dev. reau of Services of the Blind, Vocation-
and Control. al Rehabilitation Counselor, N.W. Ohio.
l yCo., Minneapolis, Minn. - 4 yrs, collegetcourse work in soc. sci.,
Alday. Male & female. MA in Econ.,I psych., soc., etc.

4

4

.4

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"AN EXTREMELY EROTIC MOVIE!"
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"EACH

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A WORK OF ART."
- Cue Magazine

A

Also
ste ng . AVI B Featuring ANGELIQUE PETTIJOHN " DON JOSLYN . ROD LAUREN " GYPSY BOOTS and LEROY JENKINS
Written and Photographed A FILM.WORLD PRODUCTION
amu SEPH GREEN Produced by DON MURRAY and Directed by JOHN DEREK A BRAINTREE PRGOUCTiM INC.RELEASE

PREMIERE
SHOWING

4-6

Starting Tonight
at7 & 9 P.M.

ELL.IS -RABB playi the philosopher in the APA's production of
"Pan4tagleize," which he also directs.
APA Founder Lauds
Ann Arbor Audience

L

By ANN MUNSTER
"Ann Arbor provides an op-
portunity to test plays against
an audience that plays a part,"
Ellis Rabb, founder of the Assoc-
iation of Producing Artists, said
yesterday. Rabb is currently dir-
ecting and acting in APA's pro-
duction of "Pantagleize," at Ly-
dia Hendelssohn Theatre.
The group is the only Ameri-
can theater company officially
chosen to represent the United
States at Expo '67. It goes to
Montreal after its run in Ann
Arbor.
Although Ann Arbor is regard-
ed partly as a tryout place, Rabb
stressed that the group tries to
achieve a balance by bringing to
the community repertory that the
APA has digested plus "experi-
ments."
The APA got its start in Ber-
muda. "It began as a workshop
activity," Rabb said, "and the
Bermuda Theater Guildl was the
first to offer us backing. They
gave us $30,000, their entire bud-
get, to do whole season. We were
all set to go to Florida at the
time."
Regarding his own initiation
into the theater, Rabb said his
interest in the theater must have
"sprung from s o m e strange
source."
His first appearance was in
the play "The Yellow Jacket" at
the Memphis Little Theater in
his home town of Memphis,
Tennessee. "I was some ancient
emperor with a fan," he said.
"My first real theater experience
came at the University of Ari-
zona, an a n i m a l husbandry
school. I was in the drama de-
partment, but I wanted to stay
with my horses."
Rabb's interests have expanded
to include both acting and dir-

said. "I am happiest with a
healthy diet though I funda-
mentally disagree with the prac-
tice of directing and acting in
the same play."
It is because he has a "special
and unique working relationship"
with John Houseman, co-director
of "Pantagleize," that Rabb is
making an exception in this play.
In keeping with his personal
desire for a "healthy diet," Rabb
feels that while some theater
should be traditional with some
degree of permance and cere-
mony there is also a place for the
highly experimental.
"The APA keeps its repertory
varied for our own stimulation
as well as for that of the adui-
ence," Rabb said. "We want it
to reflect as many different pos-
siblities of experience as the
theater can provide."
Phone 434-0130
Enfinc "Ow CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 7:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
DICK VAN DYKE
DEBBIE REYNOLDS
See it with someone you love!
Shown at 8:00 Only TECHNIc OR
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PLUS-"RASSLIN RAMPAGE"
COLOR CARTOON

MAI ZETTERLING'S
Starring
mINGRID
MNgtUR GasHULIN
MON.-THURS.-7-9 P.M.
FRI.-SAT.-7-9-1 1 P.M.
SUNDAY-6-8-10 P.M.

"FASCINATING!"
-Det. Free Press
"WICKEDLY POTENT !"
-Flint Journal
"TREMENDOUS .SCENES !"
-AA. News

"VIRTUOSITY!"
"PROVOCATIVE !"

-Toledo Blade
"SCHIZOPHRENIC"
-Daily

--Det. News

I

4

I

The sexual
awakening of a
young man
at a most
ungodly hour!

bous',,'/
..M

I

i

I

in de Ghelderode's

SEVEN ARTS PRODUCTIONS presents
A PHIL FELDMAN PRODUCTION
Pyou reab
0 , , , , 0" ,

NOW
to
Oct. 1

NTRGl 1

Evenings at
8:00 P.M.
Matinee Sun.
at 2:30 P.M.

ecting. "I have

to do both," he

I

WEE K ATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
2ND WEEK FOX EASTERN THEATRE S N
NOW FO RVILLAGE
SHOWING 375 No. MAPLE RD.-.769-1300

Showings Daily
2:00-5 :10
8:30

I

ELIZABET H HAR TMANIGERALDINE PA GE/PETER KASTNER
RIPTflRN/MPI/HA f/ INN/TflNYR/II /KARFN RIACK

Returning! PRIOR To EXPO 67
2 Great APA Hits!

Coming ! Oct. 10-15
(also Oct. 31-Nov. 5)

I

I

.I

I

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