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September 24, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-24

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PAGE TWO

TRT mle"TV- A zv IM A TT 4T

""AG -"TWO £ ZiA1111 YAR11AkA~tii FiKLY
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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1967

T

music
Nero Delights Capacity Crowd
At Hill With 'Schmaltzy Swing'

cinema
King of Hearts': Absurd Look
At Insanity of Modern Society

South Vietnamese Forces

4

By JOHN JAROSH
About the best thing that could
have happened on a rainy evening
in Ann Arbor happened as Peter
Nero .and organization appeared
in capacity filled Hill Auditorium.
Nearly 3000 Nero fans were given
lethal doses of his brand of
"schmaltzy swing" or at other
times referred to as "classical
jazz.'
Nero's ability to survive and
expand in the turbulently chan-
ging world of modern music is
evidently eloquently in his choice
of material. How can you be
wrong if you at least try to please
everyone's taste? Mr. Nero doesn't
do the least. His all-encompassing
repertoire ranged from the highly
structured music of Beethoven to
the free flowing jazz of the psy-
chedelic pop tune "Up Up And
Away."
From a - rather harsh and hum-
drum rendition.of his own hit,
"Pick Me Up,' Nero gradually
built up to something more sub-
stantial with his flashy and jazz-
punctuated performances of "Weep
Willow," "I got Rhythm" and
"Summer Sound."

whose virtuosity is somewhat con-
strained.
On the other hand, Mr. Cusatis
functioned brilliantly with his in-
grown drum sticks exploding in
the rhymes of "What is This
Thing Called Love." Faintly rem-
iniscent of the perspiring vigor of
a drug dialated Buddy Rich, Mr.
Cusatis more than adequately
demonstrates his exciting percus-
sive abilities.
Youthful Brilliance
The youthful musical brilliance
of the star, Peter Nero, coalesced
the lush talents of his associates
into sounds calculated to melt
anyone's ear-wax. His ability to
toy with the classics endeared him
to all the frustrated Bachs' and
Beethovens' in the audience;
whether it was the variations of
Beethoven done in the style of
Bach, Rachmaninoff, Liszt and
Wrigley's Chewing Gum or the
discovery of a finish to Schu-
bert's "Unfinished Symphony."
Jazz buffs were touched by the
quality of his half-educated, half-
instinctual digital syncopations.
The flashy keyboard doodling
combined with the quaint patter
of his incidental humor gave a
freshness to even the overly heard
pop tunes such as "It Was a Very
Good Year" and "Michelle."
Also interspersed in the eve-
ning's musical agenda were his
time-tested arrangements of show,
pieces such as "The Sound of

Music" and "West Side Story" By MARGARET WARNER
scores in which he neatly moved "The King of Hearts" by French
between quiet schmaltz to pure director Philippe de Broca is a
jazz energy. Responding to a tu- beautiful, poignant and very fun-
multuous volume of applause the ny film. De Broca uses an allegory
Nero organization was seduced of an insane asylum to tear down,
into first an encore of Herbie everything hallowed to middle
class society, a theme not uncom-
Alpert tunes and then finally an!mon among contemporary play-
encore of mutual appreciation. wrights and film directors.
New international Money
o Aid orld Commerce

WASHINGTON (/P)-The non-I
Communist world's finance min-j
isters are expected to approve
within the next few days what has
been hailed as the biggest ad-
vance in international finance in
more than two decades - a new
kind of world money.
It isn't gold, dollars, pounds,
francs or marks and won't be
spent by private citizens to buy
a loaf of bread or a package of
cigarettes.
It's a proposed paper transac-
tion worked out by the 10 leading
industrial nations of the non-
Communist world after two years
of study and another two years
of tedious negotiations.
Its purpose is to provide the
money, when and as needed, to
keep world trade moving smoothly.
The 22nd annual meeting of the
International M o n e t a r y Fund
opening officially tomorrow in
Rio de Janeiro will be asked to

Musical Wares
The veteran organization got to
show its musical wares in the cal-
loused fingers of bassist Gene
Charico doing a nerve shattering
"Falling in Love With Love." Mr.
Charico, however, was seemingly
handicapped by an instrument
The Week T(
. SUNDAY, SEPT. 24
2:30 and 8 p.m.-Professional
Theatre Program presents Michel
del Ghelderode's "Pantagleize" in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
presents Janus New Film Program,
Part II, in the Architecture Au-
ditoilum.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 26
7:30 p.m.-The Art of the Orient
Lecture Series of the American
Association of University Women
presents Dr. Walter M. Spink of
the University of Michigan speak-
ing on "Indian Miniature Paint-
ing" in Rackham Amphitheatre.
8 p.m. - Professional Theatre
Program presents Michel del Ghel-
derode's "Pantagleize" in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music pre-
sents University Symphony Orch-
estra concert with Josef Blatt,
conductor, and Marilyn Mason, or-
ganist in Hill Auditorium.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 27
3:30 p.m.-Professor Otto Kahn-
Freund will give a lecture for the
Thomas M. Cooley Series on "The
Law in Retreat and the Law in
Advance" in room 100 Hutchins
Hall.
8 p.m. - Professional Theatre;
Program presents Michel del Ghel-+
derode's "Pantagleize" in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-President Harlan Hatch-
er. will deliver his annual address
to faculty and staff in Rackham
Lecture Hall..A..reception will fol-
low immediately in the Michigan
League Ballroom.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 28 l
7 and 9:05 p.m.--Cinema Guild
presents Kon Ichikawa's "The
Burmese Harp" in the Architec-
ture Auditorium.
8 p.m. - Professional Theatre
Program presents Michel del Ghel-
derode's "Pantagleize" in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music pre-
sents Baroque Trio Concert in
Rackham Lecture Hall.

o Come:A Campus CalendarI

FRIDAY, SEPT. 29
3:30 p.m.-Professor Otto Kahn-
Freund will speak on "Contractual
Triangles, 'Henningsin vs. Bloom-
field' in Transatlantic Perspec-
tive": for the Thomas M. Cooley
Lecture Series in room 100 Hutch-
ins Hall.
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
presents Kon Ichikawa's "The
Burmese Harp" in the Architec-
ture Auditorium.
8 p.m. - Professional Theatre
Program presents Michel del Ghel-
derode's "Pantagleize" in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 30
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
presents Marcel Pagnol's "Marius
Trilogy, Part I: Marius" in the
Architecture Auditorium.
8 p.m. -- Professional Theatre
Program presents Michel del Ghel-
derode's "Pantagleize" in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m. - University Musical
Society presents the Chicago Sym-
phony Orchestra with Jean Mar-
tinon, conductor in Hill Auditor-
lum.

approve this new money plan as
the first amendment to the Fund's
Articles of Agreement.
The Board of Governors of the
World Bank is meeting in con-
junction with the Fund.
The United States economy and
the possibility of higher taxes, and
a possible increase in the World
Bank's lending rate of 6 per cent
will undoubtedly be discussed, at'
least informally.
But center stage will be given
to the proposed special drawing
right - SDR for= short - in the
Fund which has been hailed by
United States and other officials
as the most historic event in in-
ternational finance since the
Bretton Woods, N.M., conference
of 1944 which set up the frame-
work for IMG and the World
Bank.
Money Innovation
The proposed SDR is the first
modern attempt to create a new
type of international money.
U.S. officials are confident the
fund will approve this constitu-
tional framework to keep world
trade flowing freely in the future.
The alternative, they contend, is
restraint on trade and a slowdown
in world economic growth.
Over the past 16 years, trade
has grown three times as fast as
the supply of international money,
-gold, dollars and pounds.
The plan to create the new
money when and as it is needed
to supplement existing reserves
and keep world trade moving. It
would be used only by central
banks to settle accounts between
nations.
Approval Expected{
After its expected approval by
the Fund, the money plan must
be put into legal language and
opproved by national legislatures
including the U.S. Congress.
This process is expected by
some to take about 18 months.
It would then require an 85
per cent weighted vote of the IMF
to activate any money plan, a per-
centage which gives the European
Common Market a veto.
Secretary of the Treasury Henry
H. Fowler called this a reasonable
requirement because, he said, the
abstention of a major country or
major group of countries would
make any money plan meaning-
less.

The movie is saved from trite-
ness by three things. De Broca
has some talent for slapstick, an
insight into the absurdities of
life and an overwhelming sense
of photographic beauty.
Alan Bates (of "Georgy Girl"
fame) plays a bumbling Scotch
foot soldier named Charles in
World War II. The Allies are
advancing across Europe and the
Germans are forced to retreat
from a key French town. Being
clever, the Germans decide to
hide a huge time bomb in the cen-
ter of the town to blow after the
Allies have entered it. Both the;
townspeople and the Allied com-
manders get wind of the plot. The
townspeople flee the town. Alan
Bates and his pet carrier pigeons
are sent in to try to find the
bomb and disarm it, having only
the ambiguous clue that "the
knight strikes at midnight."
But De Broca doesn't leave the
film at that level, Bates, having
been knocked unconscious, wakes
up in a town that is inhabited by
the inmates of the asylum-play-
ing the roles that had been left
behind by the fleeing townspeople.
In a childlike way the inmates'
first wish is to be everything
that their captors had been -
beautiful, officious and dignified.
But in spite of taking on all the
symbols of their new roles, it is
obvious that they art not normal
middle class people since they
are so loving, so impractical and
De Broca's -
Crowning
Touch! {...
TOU t.
* .. ./i
ALAN BATES
PIERRE BRASSEUR
JEAN-CLAUDE BRIALY
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD
ADOLFO CELL
FRANCOISE CHRISTOPHE
JULIEN GUIOMAR
MICHELINE PRESLE
MICHEL SERRAULT
;DIAL 8-6416

so incoherent. The barber gives
shaves and pays his customers.
The bishop dances through the
streets. The general lets all the
animals out of the zoo. Soldier
Charles can't get a straight an-
swer about anything, much less
what the meaning of "the knight
strikes at midnight" might be.
The mastery of "The King of
Hearts" lies in director de Broca's
ability to capture the poetry of
the simple nonconcerned life of
the escaped inmates as opposed to
Bates' horror at the fact that the
town is likely to blow up at mid-
night. The town itself has a time-
less beauty. De Broca's photogra-
phy takes full advantage of the
stone buildings, winding streets
and the old cathedral.
Soldier Charles in World War II
France is caught up in the dilem-
ma-whether to try to fight the
impending disaster of the hidden
bombs in spite of the fact that the
task seems hopeless, or, to take
life as a beautiful absurdity for
as long as it lasts.
Nothing that de Broca says is
new. But he draws the audience
into his sense of the beauty of
life and his sense of the ultimate
absurdity of Western society.
DIAL 5-6290
"Speaks clearly and truly to a
whole new generation of long-
haired, soft-eyed kids who are be-
ginning to discover that a man is
not anman because he is tough, or
queer because he is tender."
-Newsweek Magazine

Improve During War Year
SAIGON {P)-South Vietnam's It will now bear more than it did
army is better than it was a year a year ago."
ago but still not fully effective He explained that the South
because of continuing corruption, Vietnamese troops at one time re-
a fear of fighting at night and sented Americans in command.
leadership weakness caused by "Now we have developed pro-
heavy officer casualties, Gen. Wil- cedures that beat this resistance."
liam C. Westmoreland said yester- During a briefing at Ham Tan,
day. capital of Binh Tuy Province 75
The commander of United States miles east of Saigon, the province i
forces in Vietnam said his opinion chief told Westmoreland of sev-
of the Army of the Republic of eral South Vietnamese victories
Vietnam - ARVN -'is based on against the Communists and in-
positive and negative impressions. itiatives taken by the army troops.
"And over-all," he added, "the "This would have been unheard
outcome is positive." of even six months ago," West-
Westmoreland gave his views moreland said.
in an interview with the Associat- Later the general discussed the 4
ed Press while on a field tour. progress of the entire war.
Mounting Criticism Criticism 'Anachronistic'
The South Vietnamese army He said a rising sentiment in
has come under mounting criti- the United States and elsewhere
cism in recent weeks because of against United States involvement
the increasing commitment of in Vietnam is anachronistic.
American troops. "Because you can make a case
Westmoreland contended much for not getting involved here in
of this criticism is outdated. 1954, the thinking follows that we
"Perhaps a year ago it might have should pull out now," Westmore-
been true,sbut not so today." land asserted. "But I cannot con-
ARVN is "not fully effective, the ceive in my wildest imagination of
way I want it to be." he said, abandoning these people."'
"but they're better than they were 'e bee teoUie"
a yer ,,o."They believe the United States
a year ago." won't support the war just as the
"Leadership is a big problem," French didn't. If, by some phe-
he added. nomenon, this antiwar feeling
Asked if United States officers could be reversed the policy mak-
could be used to a greater extent ers in Hanoi would quickly con-
in ARVN, Westmoreland replied: sider going to the negotiating
"As much as the traffic will bear. table."

HEL D OVER
ONE OF THE MOST GRAPHICALLY EROTIC
FILMS EVER MADE FOR PUBLIC SHOWING!'
-Playboy Magazine
From the makers of "DEAR JOHN;
a different kind of love story.
\ -ISigma Il1 -

4

I

UAC Constructs Booth
To AidOStadium Visitors

By JOYCE KOHLENBERG
Duke fans may not have noticed
it, but Michigan stadium does have
a Welcome Booth. But then, it's
only eight feet tall and stands just
inside Gate 4.
Erected by the University Ac-
tivities Center, it serves as a gen-
eral information center for visitors
and students. It is equipped with
a telephone, maps and material
concerning restaurants, entertain-
ment, travel, lodging and churches.
Three to four students from
UAC, Wyvren (junior women's
honorary), and the Student Escort
Service will staff the booth on
football Saturdays from 11:30 to
1:30, at half-time and for an hour
after the game. They eventually
hope to have famous alumni also
serve as greeters.

Bob Byrne, a member of the
UAC Social Committee and organ-
izer of the project, described some
of the problems in getting the blue,
maize-trimmed b o o t h started.
First, Fritz Crisler, University
athletic director, was reluctant to
give permission to use the booth,
Byrne said.
Next, the plan approved by the
Board in Control of Inter-Colle-
giate Athletics' neglected to make
provisions for a door.
Finally, there was trouble in
assembling the prefabricated
structure. Only one person in the
construction group was tall enough
to put on the roof. (He was 6'4".)
Standing on a ladder, he pushed
the roof a bit too hard and the
roof landed back on the ground.
A second try was more successful.

The BUUWING BROTHERSt
hroducti n
family
HAYLEY MILLS-JOHN MILLS HYWEL BENNEIT
MARJORIE RHODES
Avt AERSZ FRASER IPAULf(8fie)MciRTiiN
WiLFRED PICKLES ",JOHNMCOMJER _______ ______
Bll.("Alfie)NAU6ITON'S
TECHN ooLm
TECHNICOLOR@

SHOW
Fri. & Sat.

o0

TIMES: Mon. thru Thurs. 7:00& 9:15
7:00, 9:15 & 11:30-Sun. 6,8:15 & 10:30

Also
Showing
"WILD
WINGS"
Academy
Award
Short

i_ f

i

I

"FASCINATING!"
-Det. Free Press
"WICKEDLY POTENT !"
-Flint Journal
"TREMENDOUS SCENES!"
-A.A. News

"VIRTUOSITY!"
-Det. News
"PROVOCATIVE !"
-Toledo Blade
"SCHIZOPH RENIC"
-Daily

=.d

611111ABHiLD
PRESENTS
JANUS FILMS PRESENTS THE ARCTURUS COLLECTION
DIRECT FROM NEW YORK'S 'PHILHARMONIC HALL
a collection of brilliant short films
by the directors of the 60's (& 70's)
New CinA
Uiem:

I

HOWE)
NOW.e

!

I

.

Phone 434-0130
E e04 CARPENTIR ROAD
OPEN 7:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING-
Shown at 8:15 Only
TONY RACIOA
RAUEL WELCH
GINEMASCGPE

ElI

PROGRAM NO. 2

Concert of M. Kabal
Walerian Borowczyk, Poland
All Boys Are Named Patrick
Jean-Luc Godard, France
Ail Yoji Kurf, Japan
Act Without Words Guido Bettiol, France
Actua-Tilt Jean Herman, France
Do-It-Yourself Cartoon Kit Bob Godfrey, England
The Games of Angels Walerian Borowczyk, Poland
The Apple George Dunning, England
The Most Richard Ballentine and Gordon Sheppard, Canada

Ill'~

:". ,,

I

" :b3 ;:?;3. 3 .:,..vf 53oF.' .'ti . "x l "; i ;r:

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