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September 22, 1967 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PACE TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

F'RIDlAY. SPTE~MBER 22 M1

PAGE TEN THE MICHIGAN IJAILY

L' MLA I. 17G/: 1 Gi.Tl.DE X%, .: Z, LOU i

I

Ford Picketers Remain Optimistic
In Spite of Long Strike Prospect

luncheon, Prof. Robert Sklar: "Regis
Debray and the Revolutionary Intel-
(~D(2AklI7~rlc~t~..l lectual," Sept. 2,1- ~. ul
ORGANIZATION House, 802 Monroe, 1p.m
N )OT ICES Voice, Work committee meetings,
Draft.,Sept, 22, 2 p.m., Guild House;
________Mobilization and War Protest, Sept. 22,
_- 6:30 p.m., Guild House.

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DETROIT-Strikers against the
Ford Motor Co. apparently fore-
saw their walkout coming and
prepared for it. Picketers are still
optimistic after two weeks, and
reports of forced economic belt-
tightening are all but nonexistent
thus far.
Skimpy larders loom in the fu-
ture, however, if the strike in sup-
port of a new contract lasts the
three months which some along
the picket lines expect it may.
Ken Bannon, the UAW's Ford
department chief, estimates the
strike will last at least another six
weeks.
Bannon, expressing hope he was
too pessimistic, estimated it will
be another month "before the
pieces start falling together" in
negotiations of a new contract be-
tween Ford and the UAW. Then,
he predicted, it will take another
two weeks to fit all the pieces
together.
However, Sidney F. McKenna,
Ford director of labor affairs,
views Bannon's prediction as "a
discouraging assessment," but de-
clines to make a forecast him-
self.
Workers say that failure of the
company and union to agree on
anything in weeks following the
opening of negotiations back on
July 11 foretold strike.
The company and union blame
each other for the walkout. It
erupted from diagreement on-
economic issues, including union
demands for a guaranteed an-
nual income, a substantial wage
increase and no tampering with
a cost-of-living escalator on which
wages rose 18 cents an hour in
' three years.
Union strike benefit payments
began yesterday, the 15th day of
the strike which began Sept. 7
with the UAW's 160,000 members

walking out and closing Ford corporate profits, a "substantial" The UAW International Execu-
plants across the country. pay hike, boosts in fringe benefits tive Board meets in Detroit today
Weekly benefit payments, how- and improved working conditions. to recommend a strike-supporting
ever, run to only about a day's Since the walkout, Ford and increase in union dues paid by
normal pay. They range from $20 UAW negotiators have not return- UAW members still working. A
for a single worker to $30 for a ed to economic issues and are not ' special convention of the union is!
worker with a family. That com- expected to before next week, at set for Oct. 8 in Detroit to act
pares, Ford says, with the average the earliest. on the recommendation.
weekly gross paycheck of $155.83 While striking Ford. the union Meanwhile, bargainers decided
its hourly workers got last year. kept its members working without Tuesday at GM to concentrate
Bannon said Thursday the com- contracts in GM and Chrysler immediately on seeking at-the-
pany had advised him more than plants, which together employ plant working agreements which
1,500 skilled tradesmen have re- almost 500,000. supplement national contracts,
moved their tool boxes from plants
thus far, indicating they likely
have found employment elsewhere. 0
William Hoffman, president of
UAW Local 863 at Cincinnati,
Ohio, said some strikers there cLJ17HA L7LU AU
speculate the walkout may last
until Christmas.
Economic side effects of the Food and Entertainment
strike against Ford Motor Co. are
mounting, and the diagnosis is o the Islands
that they'll get much worse.
Already hundreds of jobs in
supplier factories and in transpor-
tation have vanished, along with SUNDAY, Sept. 24
160,000 in Ford plants across the6O
country. 6:30 P.M.-Only $1.25
As the strike enters its third
week today, industrial spokesmen
say that layoffs elsewhere likely 0 NEWMAN -3 31 Thompson
will be accelerated.
Ford was struck at midnight0
Sept. 6 as three-year contracts ran
out there and at Chrysler and _______________} ti-_________________
General Motors. The UAW chose
Ford as its target, hoping to use
whatever it wins there as the pat-
tern for subsequent settlements at.
Chrysler and GM, in that order. 0
The UAW struck in support of
what it calls its "longest and most
ambitious list of demands" in his- VANGUARD RECORD'SG
tory, and it was over economic
issues, including a demand for
guaranteed annual income, that
negotiations begun in July finally Singin Playin the BLUES
foundered.Snn P' g eL
Labor demands include a guar-TU
anteed annual income, a share of This FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY,
Sept. 22, 23, 24 at 8 P.M.
onroe $1.50 with goodies gratio
HOUSE 330 MAYNARD
'TEMBER 22
2--- --

jUSE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN- ** *
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially South Quad Council, Smitty's fea-
recognized and registered student orga- tures Peter Bowen, Sept. 22, 8:30 p.m.,
recgnied nd egiterd sudet o G0103 South Quad.
nizations only. Forms are available in G .
Rn. 111 SAB, * * Baha'i Student Group holds informal
discussion, Fri., Sept. 22, 8 p.m., 520 N.
Friends of Vietnam Fall, Draft com- Ashley. Call 662-3548 if you need trans-
mittee meeting, Sept. 22, 2 p.m., Guild portation.
House, 802 Monroe. **
* *
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
UM Chess Club, Meeting, Sept. 22. Washtenaw, Sept. 22, 8:30ap.m.,fourth
7:30 p.m., 3rd floor, Union, Friday forum-Grad students will be led
* * by Pastor Leland Teuscher in a dis-
Guild House sponsors Friday noon cussion on "Tension in the Litergy."

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GRADUATE MIXER
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
8 P.M.

i

1429 Hill St. 66
REFRESHMENTS * DA
MEMBERS FREE
NON-MEMBERS 50c
You must be 21

3-4129
ANCING

- - - - - - -- - -- - --- ------- ---- --------- - -------- - - -

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SABBATH SERVICE
Friday at 7:15 P.M.
Panel Discussion Following Services
THE DRAFT
What are the details of the current law? What are some
practical alternatives that undergraduates and gradu-
ates can use this year? What is the nature of conscien-
tious objections?

...afhd
Mhat:
theiveae &ubeck

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REV. EDGAR EDWARDS
Director, Guild House
DR. ERWIN GAEDE
First Unitarian Church
ROBERT HAUERT
Office of Religious
Affairs

LARRY KATZ
Administrative Assistant
to the University
Registrar
DR. NICHOLAS
KAZARINOFF
Professor of Math
DR. HERBERT KELMAN
Professor of Psychology

-;

Q uaate t
Wednesday, Sept. 27

8 P.M.

450 400

350

I

JOHN SONQUIST
Study Director, Survey Research Center
C.O. Counsellor, Ann Arbor Friends Center
JOHN PLANER, Cantor
Choir Directed by STEVEN OVITSKY
JOAN SPITZER, Organist
1429 Hill Street All Are Welcome

Ford Auditorium

802 M
GUILD,
FRIDAY, SEP
-Noon Lunch

eon--

mac

; -= .
!}
; -

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PROF. ROBERT SKLAR, Dept. of History:
"REGIS DEBRAY AND THE
REVOLUTIONARY INTELLECTUAL"

i.

CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
2145 INDEPENDENCE
South of Washtenaw, East of Packard
For Transportation Phone: 665-8167, 665-2831
SERIES ON FORUMS

M

UNION-LEAGUE

presents

CONTROVERSY

67

'I

HILL AUDITORIUM

I

TONIGHT at
THE ARK

"MAN IN A REVOLUTIONARY WORLD"

i

1421 Hill Street
8:30 P.M.
THE LAURALEI singing English, Scottish
and Appalacian Ballads and WILL GEER,
APA star, doing Walt Whitman and Robert
Frost.

1
r
i
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T___J

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MARK LANE
Sept. 27-8 P.M.

BARRY
GOLDWATER
Oct. 8-3 P.M.

BISHOP
JAMES PIKE

F. LEE BAILEY
Oct. 29-3 P.M.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 24-8 P.M. (7:30 Coffee)
"EDUCATION CAN RESPOND to
a REVOLUTIONARY WORLD"

LEROY CAPPAERT
Ann Arbor Public School Principal,
Director of Wines School Summer Program

Tickets: Series
Student-$3 .00
Non-Student--$5.00
Single Admission:
Student-$1.00
Non-Student-$1.50

Oct. 11-8 P.M.
Ticket Sales:
Diag-1OA.M.-3 P.M.
Hill Aud.-10A.M.-3 P.M.
North Campus Commons-i11:30 A.M.-1 2:30 P.M.
Law Club-11:30 A.M.-] 2:30 P.M.

I

I

Saturday-8:30 P.M.-WILL GEER
WHITE doing "Bound for Glory," a'
Guthrie Folk-in.

& BOB
Woody

FUTURE DATES:
Transportation:

Oct. 8, Oct. 22
665-8167,
665-2831

INVITATIONS TO RECEPTIONS AVAILABLE AT UAC OFFICES

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