100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 22, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 22.-1967

PAETW HEMCIG NDAL__ lS JPT~RF.~

A.' AVA"- A 9 KJ7 K ALJVWAi1Li AV fJQT AOU 1

I

poetry and prose
*Garg' Huge Financial Success
In Spite of Tired Stock Jokes

1.

cinema=

I

I

Bonnie and Clyde'
Festivty of Crime

:0

Across
Camp us

By DAVID BIRCH
I attempted to divide my soul
into easily comprehended little
boxes : for the Michigan Student
Study last year, and I came out
finely chopped, but it seems I'm
something of a politico-scholar-
hippy-intellectual with a little
artsy-craftsiness ground in. A
jact-of-all-beings and inhabitant
of none.
It was 4, difficult situation: I
was too deaf to hear myself say
that I was a lethargic grub and
they hadn't invented the jargon
Within - an - ice - cream - cone
syndrome. But they knew I
Wasn't Greek and guessed that I
wasn't very funny.
Which is perhaps the reason I
don't understand much of the
new Gargoyle. I couldn't do better
myself and don't know many who
could sustain the effort for over
30 pages. Yeah, we amuse our-
selves quite a bit, but maybe a lot
of people wouldn't get it. Humor
is rampant over the land; witness
the big kick Congress got out of
the rat-control bill; but it's real
hard making it work in print.
Some of the pastiche, where the
satire is quickly understood, is
good: the name "Sesqui-Bohn,"
the blurbs of the Sesquicentennial
festshrifts., the "Sell popcorn at
SGC meetings" cartoon, the sec-
ond paragraph of the marijuana
article, the ad announcing the
Gargoyle mass meeting.
Other items are too ambiguous
and take too long to decipher to
be funny: Are the junkies or the
junky watchers (p. 15) supposed
to be the satirical object; the
William Burrough's quote or the
belching antithesis of Amy Van-
derbilt?
Is Norm the Rabbit supposed
to be a poorly done Snoopy, a CNP
liberal, or a Negro in a white
mask who is being torn apart by
a white society?.
Sarcasm is difficult to deliver
well; satire is difficult to write.
It takes a sarcastic mind to ap-
preciate sarcasm, and the aud-
ience must dislike that which is

satirized as much as the satinis;
So perhaps the difficulty in Garg
is in this lack of shared values
between the editors and myself,
but it also results from the am-
biguity of the writing.
Then, there are the freak shows
-the grossities that lack the spirit
of good four letter words. Freaks
really aren't humorous, and gross-
ness used only to nauseate is a
waste of ink. So why The Daily
ad, the anecdote on p. 27 about
the woman dressed as a cow, etc.?
The tired stock jokes produce
only a yawn: Sesqui-Bohn: as fra-
ternity leader, campus politico,
flunkee in the School of Oral
Hygiene; the letter from Skokie;
the Erich Walters quote and the
accompanying photograph; the
interview with the designer of the
raw carrots test; and ,he bumper
stickers that have been all over
for several months.

Satire is probably easier to
write than to define, and since
writing it well is difficult, defin-
ing it is close to impossble. But
it has to describe real situations,
not hordes waiting to get in at
the Blue Front that are never
there, not ludicrously neurotic
psychologists.
Examples of good satire I can
give you, satire that does a lot
more. Like Lenny Bruce's "How to
Talk Dirty and Influence People."
Putting out a student publica-
tion is a full-time job. Being a
student is at least a part-time job
and doing both causes heartache
I know, I know. But explanations
of cause are not apologies for the
existence of an imperfect object.
This issue of Garg was a whop-
ping financial success, which over
on Maynard Street is a big deal.
If a sixth of the' campus wants to
read it, good luck!

House Votes Federal Aid
For Educational Television

WASHINGTON (P) - The
House voted last night to boost
federal support for non-commer-
cial radio and television by creat-
ing a public broadcasting corpor-
ation to subsidize programming
and help local stations combine
into a network..
The legislation, already approv-
ed in slightly different form by
the Senate, was passed by a roll-
call vote of 265 to 91 after a Re-
publican move to eliminate the
corporation was defeated 194 to
167. The measure authorizes $9
million to create the corporation
and includes $38 million for feder-
al construction grants to local
educational stations over the next
three years.
The proposed corporation was
characterized by one opponent,
Rep. Albert W. Watson,' R-S.C.,
as a "frankenstein" and "a 'mon-
ster," and hailed by backers as

an important step in the nation's
cultural development.
"This could be the most im-
portant bill that comes out of
the 90th Congress," said Rep.
Harley O. Staggers, D-W.Va.,
chairman of the Commerce Com-
mittee. and chief sponsor of the
administration proposal.
Many speakers attacked the
state of programming on commer-
cial television networks.
"Television has never realized
its potential," said Rep. Charles
S. Joelson, D-N.J., adding that
"our technology has by far out-
run our good taste."
He described television fare as
"pablum, pap, junk, vapid medio-
crity" Rep. Richard D. McCarthy,
D-N.Y., paraphrasing the "vast
wasteland" comment of former
Federal Communications Com-
mission Chairman Newton W.
Minow, said "Television for chil-
dren is a mini-wasteland."

By ELLEN FRANKI
Last July Detroit's Mayor Cav-
anaugh spoke of "a carnival at-
mosphere" in the rioting city. If
it was difficult to understand the
nature of the festivities, and what
wrongs were being righted, some
answer can be found in "Bonnie
and Clyde."
It is the simplistic "product of
our society" answer - the one a
Recorder's Court judge might
have accepted in arraigning a 19-
year-old girl-married, no record.
one child.
Bonnie and Clyde are mid-
Americans of the '30's. Are they
criminals because they rob banks
and kill cops? Not at all-they
simply react to love for adven-
ture, the desperate Depression
'30's, and the American Heritage
of violence.
Bonnie and Clyde are heroes.
They won't harm anyone but a
policeman. They won't rob any-,
thing but a bank-the banks of
the '30's that were foreclosing
Steinbeck-like farmers. At one
point the gang joyously pick up
the couple whose car they have
stolen. Bonnie eases them in say-
ing, "It's not like you were the
law. You're jes' folks, like us."
In matching violence with his
own violence, his response to au-
thority is not perhaps always jus-
tified, but it should be under-
standable. Part of his heroism is
that he kills only when he has to.
The gentle Clyde is very different
from the 15 policemen who stoodI
Phone 434-0130
Eth nr CA p E R R AD
OPEN 7:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
Shown at 8:05 and 12:30
TONY FRANCIOSA
RAQUEL WELCH
c NEMASCOfl
COLOR by DELUXE
Also ...I
Shown at
10 00 only
a o f e
COOR BY DE LUXE
PLUS-"RIVIERA REVELRIES'
COLOR CARTOON

Robert J. Niess, professor of
French, has been awarded the
by as Clyde's brother, blinded by grade of Chevalier in the French
blood, gagged and died in the dust. Ordre des Palmes Academiques.
'In the end, Bonnie and Clyde It was conferred by the French
are tricked by the father of one government through Prof. Edouard
of their partners. The two, stop- Morot-Sir, cultural ambassador to
ping to help change a flat tire, the United States and represen-
are brutally machine gunned from tative of the French Universities.
behind a tree. Death was expect- P
ed, so grief is numbed. But there's Prof. Niess has been at the
also the thought that "Bonnie and University since 1949.
Clyde wouldn't have tricked any-
one-or killed them with enough Dr. F. Gaynor Evans of the
bullets that their body looked University's department of anat-
eaten away." omy and the Highway Safety Re-
It is the Robin Hood justifica- search Institute has been invited
tion for crime that differentiates to present two papers this week
"Bonnie and Clyde" from the to the conference on stress an-
many other violent films now be- alysis in bioengineering. The con-
ing shown. Unlike "The Dirty ference is sponsored by the Insti-
Dozen" or "A Fistful of Dollars," tute of Physics and is being held
the film goes beyond a portrayal at University College in London.
to an explanation of violence.. Dr. Evans will also consult with
Bosley Crowther, film critic of colleagues R. M. Kenedi, head
Beyw Yowkthe, flm d crith oof the bioengineering unit at the
the New York Times, claimed that University of Stratchclyde in Glas-
"Bonnie and Clyde" is neither gow; G. H. Baud at the Institute
"wholesome entertainment," nor of Morphology of the University of
a realistic portrayal of the earth- Geneva, and Antonio Ascenzi, head
ier Bonnie and Clyde who robbed of the Institute of Morbid Anat-
and killed in the '30's. Mr. Crow- omy at the University of Pisa.
ther overlooks the value of the At Pisa he will present a seminar
film; it states that America's cur- on his own research on the rela-
rent violence is a near tradition tion between the physical proper-
understandable as a retaliation to ties and histological structure of

Steel Hauler Strike Sets Off
8 New Shooting Incidents
PITTSBURGH, Pa. UP) - Pen- in their car. The men told the
nsylvania and Ohio police beefed deputies they were truckers.
up patrols yesterday in the wake Arnmco Steel Corp. used con-
of eight new shootings and rock voys and armed guards at its
tossings triggered by an eight- Middletown, Ohio, plant to move
state strike of independent stell out steel.
haulers. The strike for more money by
Trucking companies hired armed Toe s0rig o ne y h y
guards and sent their rigs out in Ithe steel companies choking on
convoys. Some truckers packed their inventories.
their own weapons.
Pennsylvania Turpike police Workers Idea
said one trucker cut loose with Republic Steel Corp., the na-
a shotgun after men threw rocks tion's third largest steelmaker,
at his truck near Somerset. No will have idled 2,500 of its 7,000
charges were filed. workers by the end of the week.
Shots Reported Other plants in the eight-state
No injuries were reported, but area have slacked off. Affected
police said eight trucks were fired are Pennsylvxania, Ohio, Michi-
on in Ohio and two others way- gan, Illinois, New York, West
laid with rocks on the Pennsy- Virginia, Kentucky and Indiana,
ivania Turnpike. where the strike started nearly a
Turnpike police upped their month ago.
patrols 50 per cent in the ambush- The strikers are asking for 79
ridden pre-dawn hours. per cent of the truck hauling fees
Five men were arrested in Ohio and pay while waiting to be load-
for possession of concealed wea- ed. They now get 73 per cent and
pons. Tuscarawas County deputies wait on their own time.
said they found three loaded guns, In Chicago, strike leaders met
170 rounds of ammunition, two with Central States Teamster of-
fire bombs and a load of bricks ficials. No progress was reported.

1

4

4

4

I

economic injustice and authority. bone.

I
7
i

N OW ALGRALAT==-
SHOWING FOH VILLGE
375No. MAPLE RD.-769.1300

TIMES DAILY
2:00-510
8:25

a m

James Aichener's novel reaches the scre
1 0 ~
THF MIRISCH CORPORATION PRESENTS
JULIE ANDREWS
MAX VON SYDOW
RICHARD HARRIS
in THE GEORGE ROY HILL WAALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION of
"HAWAII"

reen

HELD OVER
"ONE OF THE MOST GRAPHICALLY EROTIC
FILMS EVER MADE FOR PUBLIC SHOWING!
-Playboy Magazne

rom
aMdiff
-r,

the makers of "DEAR JOHN"
erent kind of love story.
IX Sigma IllK41

0

__

SHOW
Fri. & Sat.

TIMES: Mon. thru Thurs. 7:00 & 9:15
7:00, 9:15 & 11 :30-Sun. 6, 8:15 & 10:30

A

De Broca's
Crowning Touchl
. t
DIAL 8-6416
~ (

ALAN BATES
PIERRE BRASSEUR
}JEAN-CLAUDE BRIALY
c3ENEVIEVEBUJOLD
ADOLFO CELL
FRANCOISE CHRISTOPHE
JULIEN GUIOMAR
MICHELINE PRESLE
MICHEL SERRAULT-

i

ACRES OF FREE-FREE PARKING

ar Also
Showing
"WILD
WINGS"
Academy
Award
Short

I

I

4

If You Are In Any Of The, Following Age Groups

PHILIPPE DE BROCA
scraanot und atoyey.try DANIEL BOULANGER
by GEORGES DELERUE
COLOR by DELUXE TECHNISCOPE
"0-oN by LGHT Pa 7 ndCor9otP. .
ORGIRĀ£ OTO PC~R S)V~RAK TO NIGHT at 7 and 9 .M

20

- 30

- 40

- 50

- 60 or over

"The
FAMILY
WAY"
T N
TECHNICOLOR

4

You Are Ready To Enjoy One Of The Better
Motion Pictures Of 1967! A Superb Film!

I

I

"EXCELLENT!"
--Judith Crist Today Show
"A JUMPING UP AND
DOWN RAVE!"
-Gene Shalit, Joyce hulig.
Ladies Home Journal

*Dial
NQ 2-6264

1:00-3:10
5 :10-7:15
9:201

UA R:~ F 'E DII
131i OIMIIE Y $ CK VDE

A

I

Tender Humor, A Delicate Subject "FAMILY WAY" A Superb Film
Comedy is not the same thing as humor. Comedy is detached from life, commenting on it and making fun of it but essentially make-believe. Humor reflects the human condition
as it really is, in its fumbling, bumpling, loveable, painful but laughable moments.
Comedy can be critical or kind, but humor, even when it's gentle, has the bite and warm familiar feeling - of truth. That is why "THE FAMILY WAY" is not a comedy even
though it's one of the funniest films of the year. THE DETROIT FREE PRESS-August 17, 1967.
"THE FAMILY WAY" is the story of newlyweds whose marriage, in the words of one character in the film, "hasn't taken on." When you see this unusual motion picture you will
enjoy it to such a degree, that you will want to see it again and again. Also you will want to tell all of your friends and neighbors to see it. Its that kind of screen entertainment.

Photo I, Arthur Fitton II v'yw l Bennetd) takes Jennry Piper JI Iit'e
MIills) in-*wedlc k,

P'hoto 4. the yomuuu us ibancd seeks advice fromui marriagze guidance
CO 1S1)1o.

I

U

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan