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September 21, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER. 21, 196'7

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN'

THRDY EPEBR2, 97TEMCHGNDIY AESVN

Grayle Howlett
OFF BASE
I Get No Kick
From Soccer
Speaking of soccer.
Kind of a hokey opening, but really the only way to get into
the subject. As a matter of fact, I've never come across anyone who
has spoken about it, much less given much thought to it.
The only reason why I'm devoting a little space to it now is
because everything in the world of sports is so likable at the moment.
I men, the American League finally has a race to end all races, Michi-
gan is still undefeated, and Vince Lombardi finally has looked bad.
That leaves soccer as the only thing that I can attack in good con-
science.
Don't get me wrong, I love sports. I consider the time I've
spent discussing whether Ted Williams entered the last game of
the 1941 season hitting .401 or .3997 as golden. But I'm telling
you that you got trouble right here in sports city, and it begins
with "S" which rhymes with "yecchhh" which stands for soccer.
Now listen up soccer lovers and I'll explain why out of all the
sports ranging from curling to jai alai, soccer commands all my
wrath.
There's no scoring.
Let me emphasize that I'm one of the few guys around that likes
defense. The stall is one of my favorite plays in basketball. I could
stand to watch the White Sox all year long. I'd rather see an eight
minute touchdown drive using the old fashioned belly series than
the long "bomb" which consumes maybe 10 seconds.
So scoring isn't that important to me, but its lack in the game
of soccer it's ridiculous.
Even in the greatest defense battle in hockey you'll still see
at least fifty shots on goal. This would be a season high in soccer.
How can you like a sport where the offensive strategy is to play for
a tie? It seems that the prevailing attitude is that if the other team
doesn't score, then we've won. Isn't this the attitude that endeared
Scoring was at such a premium this past season on CBS's
network coverage of the National Professional Soccer League that
even after a goal was scored they missed it three out of four times
on the instant replay. You know the worst job in the world had to
be statistician for one of these teams. It got so all the goalies were
filing for unemployment compensation.
Another thing that gets me about soccer is that it just doesn't
look like an All-American sport. Here we are not great admirers of
condition and stamina. We just don't care for well developed lungs
and muscular heads. Because a guy can run up and down field with-
out even breathing hard just doesn't command respect. Over here we
the Vitalis look, you know,. the tight-fitting pants, well-cropped hair,
the Valentino profile. We could care about endurance.
And the first time I saw a guy "head" a ball in soccer I be-
came deathly ill. Even though it was a perfectly acceptable play
to soccer it still looked like something worthy of Dick Stuart or
Jake Wood.
And while I'm rolling, another thing that alienates me toward
soccer is that its terms are perfectly logical. "Heading," "corner kick,"
"nenalty shot," are all things which you can figure out. I believe in
using terms which have no logical explanation such as "bull pen" or
"Texas Leaguer" or "ragging the puck."
Soccer burst on the American scene this past summer with all
the impact of somebody spitting on the Sahara dessert. It was
about as noticed as a guy taking off his shirt in a topless joint.
It had to be thrilling sight to see some 2,000 screaming patrons
jam the confines of Soldier's Field. If you gathered together every-
body in this country who saw a soccer game this past summer you
could cram them into a phone booth and still make the call.
What amazed me is how most of the sportswriters were quite
cordial to the invasion of soccer. But everything that was written
seemed to say, "there must be something to this-after all look how
big it is all over the world."
My answer to this is in most other countries soccer is the only
sport commanding the sports lovers money. Over here we've been
exposed to a few more. Besides, the spectators over here don't like
to finish the fights the players start.

Top AL Contenders

T

By The Associated Press
BOSOX TRIUMPH
CLEVELAND - Reggie Smith's
two-out single in the ninth in-
ning scored Carl Yastrzemski with
the winning run as the Boston
Red Sox hung on to their share
of the American League lead with
a 5-4 victory over Cleveland last
night.
Yastrzemski, who slammed his
41st homer earlier, touched off
Boston's winning rally with his
fourth hitnof the night with two
out in the ninth.
He moved to second on George
Culver's wild pitch and stayed
there when George Scott walked.
Then Smith lined his hit to right
field and Yastrzemski dashed
home.
Six home runs accounted for the
game's first eight runs. Consecu-
tive homers by Tony Horton and
Max Alvis tied it for the Indians
in the seventh.

TIGERS WIN
DETROIT - Al Kaline slam-
med his 25th home run and keyed
two other Detroit rallies with
doubles to back Joe Sparma's
seven-hit pitching as Detroit
snapped a three-game losing
streak with a 10-1 victory over
New York last night.
The victory kept the Tigers
one game behind league leading
Boston and Minnesota,' which
both won, and put them in a tie
for third place with Chicago,
which met California in a night
game.
Kaline's homer, a solo shot,
came in the first inning off loser
Al Downing. He doubled home a
run in Detroit's two-run third
for his second RBI and led off
the four-run Tiger fifth with his
second double.
Sparma, 15-9, who struck out
eight, was in trouble in the early
innings.

TWINS SUCCEED
MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL -
Tony Oliva and Bob Allison slam-
med two-run homers and Harmon
Killebrew drive in two runs with
a pair of singles, pacing Minnes-
ota and Dean Chance to a 6-2
victory over Kansas City yester-
day.
Oliva's 16th homer handed
Chance a 4-2 lead afterdKille-
brew's secon drun-scoring singlek
tied the game in the third inning.
Allison's 22nd homer gave the
Twins a 6-2 cushion in the fifth.
Chance allowed only four hits
in posting his 19th victory against
12 losses.
He struck out 13, running his
season total to 207.

0
-iumph
CARDS DUMPED
PHILADELPHIA MP) - Cookie
Rojas' run-scoring single in the
fourth inning drove in the tie-
breaking run last night and Phila-
delphia beat St. Louis 3-1 despite
Steve Carlton's 16-strikeout pitch-
ing performance for the Cards.
Chris Short struck out nine and
the two-team total of 25 strikeouts
was one shy of the'major-league
ecord set by the Phillies and Pitts-
burgh in 1965. Carlton's total was
the high in the majors this season.
The Phillies scored the third on
singles by Bobby Wine, Rojas and
Tony Taylor. Ed Spiezo tied the
game with his third home run in
the fourth inning.

LAST CHANCE!
EXPO '67 57900
October 13-October 15
See Expo before it closes; this is
the event of the decade.

0
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The price includes:
ROUND TRIP AIR TRANSPORTATION
HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS
EXPO PASSPORTS
EXPO GU I DEBOOK
Limited Reservations, So HURRY!
CALL
JOHN GUNNING
761-1907
OR
STUDENT TOURS
20930 Mack, Grosse Pointe Woods
886-0844

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Minnesota 87 66 .569 -
Boston 87 66 .569 -
x-Chicago 86. 67 ?562 1
Detroit 86 67 .562 1
x-California 78 72 .520 7%j
Cleveland 72 82 .468 15/
Baltimore 71 81 .467 15/
Washington 70 82 .461 161/2
New York 66 87 .431 21
Kansas City 59 92 .391 27
x-Late game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 4-6, Washington 3-3 (2nd
10 inn)
Minnesota 6, Kansas City 2
Boston 5, Cleveland 4
Detroit 10, New York 1
Chicago at California (inc)
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at Minnesota
Boston at Cleveland (n)
Baltimore at Washington (n)
Only games scheduled

NATIONAL LEAGUE

x-St. Louis
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Chicago
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Atlanta
Los Angeles
Houston
New York

W
96
83
83
82
78
76
74
69,
63
57

L
57
68
70
72
83
77
78
83
89
94

Pct.
.627
.550
.542
.532
.517
.497
.487
.454
.414
.377

GB
12
12
412
17
20
2112
26Y2
332
38

x-Clinched pennant.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 5, Chicago 1
Philadelphia 3, St. Louis 1
Los Angeles 4, New York 3
Cincinnati 9, Atlanta 4
Houston 5, Pittsburgh 4
TODAY'S GAME
Atlanta at St. Louis (n)
Only game scheduled

f: N
ti
k
THE MARLIN JACKET is brawny but sleek-
cut to a sharp, seafaring shape in
WASH 'N WEAR Whaler Cloth (a hefty cotton poplin).
Then the shell is treated for SHOWER-REPELLENCY.
It's styled with raglan shoulders,
knit English collar, umbrella yoke,
and plaid lining. In British tan, natural or navy. Regular
sizes 36 to 46 at $12 ... long
sizes 38 to 46 (not available in British tan) at $13

TM Golf Crowns Awarded;
Zahn All-Campus Champion

By DAVE THOITS
Several low scores and a record
team performance highlighted last
weekend's intramural golf tourna-
ment held at the University Golf
Course. Competition was conduct-
ed by four man teams from res-
idence halls, social fraternities,
professional fraternities, and in-
dependent teams, along with in-
dividuals competing unattached.
Hayden House, East Quad, broke
the record for residence halls with
a score of 346, erasing the old
mark of 353 set back in 1954.
Hayden was led by Steve Gort-
maker with an 83. Jim Anderson
shot an 86, Tom Pinho an 88, and
Mark Fischer an 89. Scott House
finished nine strokes behind with
355, and Allen Rumsey was one
more shot back.
Charles Zahn was crowned All-
Campus Champion Tuesday as he
defeated thirty rivals with a 36-
hole total of 143. Zahn, who rep-
resented the Electrical Engineers,
shot a 73 Sunday and followed
that with a two-underpar 70 Tues-
day to defeat Chris Cling by two
shots. Kling lead Zahn by a stroke
going into the final round. Jim
Kling finished in third with a 149
score.
Phi Delta Phi's 320 score proved
to be well ahead of the rest of
the field in the professional frater-

nities division. Ray Levan shot a
78, Skip McCabe and Tom Horton
shot 79's, and Mac LaFevre had
an 84 to give the Phi Delts the
lowest team total of the tourna-
ment. The Law Club followed in
second with 337 and Alpha Kappa
Psi finished third with a 353 total.
The Evans Scholars won the so-
cial fraternity event with a score
of 326. Pat Pomy's 77, Paul Han-
rath's 77, Randy Reith's 84, and
Dan Schewe's 88 made up the win-
ning total. Psi Upsilon finished
second with 337 while Sigma Phi
Epsilon came in third.
The independent team title was
copped by the Rams with a score
of 321. Jim Clink's 78, Fred Adams'
and Tom Stevens' 80's, and Bruce
Miller's 83 were good enough to
outdistance Newman Club, which
finished second with 332.

I

IN OUR MEN'S SPORTSWEAR DEPARTMENTS

U

HILL AUDITORIUM
Sept. 23, 1967
TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE
Tickets: $3.50, $3.00, $2.50
HILL AUDITORIUM BOX OFFICE
Sponsored by the Panhellenic Association
and the Interfraternity Council

* VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA INC.

Daily Classifieds Get Results

i

I

IF

It's been replaced.

For the 19th consecutive year, we've
replaced the bug.
With another bug.
To those of you who expected some-
thing fancier, sorry. (The '68 looks just
like the '67 crossed out above.)
To those of you who now own a VW,
congratulations. (Once again your model
has not gone out of style.)
To those of you who've been thinking

(They have built-in headrests.
The windshield wipers are much more
efficient. (They're larger.)
Even the shifting is easier. (We put a
decal on the window to show you how.)
All in all, we feel that the 36 nice little
changes on this year's Volkswagen make
it the best ever.
Of course, every year we build the
"perfect" Volkswagen.

"BEEF ROLL ... and here it is, the new look in
Phi Bates handsewn tradition. This
finely crafted Beef Roll Penny Loafer will add a fashion Nair
to your wardrobe. The supple leathers, hand lasted and hand.

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