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August 29, 1967 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 29,196:

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Theatre in Ann Arbor: An ExpandingRole

ALL CAMPUS GROUP:
Glee Club Opens 108th Season
After Nine Week World Tour

By LIZ WISSMAN
Arts Editor, 1966-67
There are two theories most
often cited to explain the appar-
ent health and dynamism of the
theatre in Ann Arbor. One re-
lates Ann Arbor to a general de-
centralizing movement in the
American Theatre, away from the
single tyrannical rule of Broad-
way. Another view is that they
drama is traditional to University
life, where it enjoys an existence
unnaturally prolonged by the con-
centrated intellectual atmosphere.
Both theories have a superficial
application to the permanent
companies and the occasional pro-
ductions of live theatre in Ann,
Arbor. 'But both exhibit a bit too
much of the heady optimism of
the American Cultural boom.
The "physical plant" of Ann

Arbor theatre is undeniably grand.-
Few American communities of its
size can boast of no less than
three resident troupes of perform-
ers. There is the projected Uni-
versity Playhouse which will cost
over $4 million when it is com-
pleted.
But the recent failure of the
ambitious Ypsilanti Greek Theatre
has caused some observers to
doubt both the sheltering academ-
ic environment, and the depth of
our current Cultural Boom. Does
theatre in Ann Arbor signify a
challenge to the tastes of. Broad-
way - or does it merely bring
Broadway a little closer at hand?
The most illustrious drama in
Ann Arbor is that produced by
the Professional Theatre Program:
In cooperation with the Univer-
sity, the PTP sponsors profes-

sional theatrical events through-
out the school year. The fall se-
mester is traditionally the time of
APA-the Association of Perform-
ing Artists, under the direction of
Ellis Raab. A repertory company
making use of rotating scripts and
players, the APA resembles the
kind of dramatic company which
formed the core of the recent
theatrical renaissance in England.
It has been selected as the sin-
gle American troupe to appear at
Expo '67, along with the illus-
trious English National Theatre
and the Canadian Stratford Play-
ers.
APA differs, however, from
these companies in that it is
neither a singular festival nor a
permanent resident in Ann Arbor.
The. other half of each year is
spent in New York.

The same comment may be
made about the PTP's 'New Play
Project," which subsidizes the pro-
duction of 'original manuscripts.
This theatrical project, as well as
the APA, often precedes a New
York engagenun . Such planned
productions as "Lxit the King" by
Ioenesco, which will be performed
in APA's Fall 1967 Festival, may
indeed improve the general fare
which is offered on Broadway. But,
ask the critical, will it provide a
viable alternative to Broadway?
The selection of the particular
play to, be used in the "New Play
Project" suggests that the stress
is not layed upon newness. Studs,

of Ann Arbor-principally the
University Players and the Ann
Arbor Civic theatre-are more free
to experiment. But, like College
and Little Theatres everywhere,
they sufer from a lack of time,
money, and facilities.
A third, and surprising, source
of theatre has arisen from the
University's Department of Com-
parative Literature. Last year's
production of "The Blacks" sug-
gested a new boldness of casting
and dramatic technique. But,
again, theatre is not the principal
concern of this department, and
quality is likely to be uneven.
Certainly, there is no lack of'

Terkel, this year's chosen author, quantity to the theatre in Ann
has already amply demonstrated Arbor. But critics find it disturbing
his success with contemporary life, that there is not experimenation.
if not directly with the drama. As one student put it, "They
The other dramatic companies couldn't get a better audience if
they designed it themselves." In
the sheltered and highly subsidized
neighborhood in which it lives,
why is Ann Arbor theatre likely to
be amateur or comfortable, or
merely a trial run before "hitting
the big tirie?"
Theatrical Environment
Perhaps the answer lies in the
original assumption that Ann Ar-
bor provides the perfect theatrical
environment, ready-made. The
>:{ ," greatest success which was put on
last year, A.P.A.'s "School for
Scandal," was a familiar play. The
quality of the audience-the pre-
sumed intellectual elite-was not
demonstrated in hard, box-office
statistics. And, as Welter Kerr has
pointed out, a subsidized theatre
does not mean a successful theatre.
Above all, a play must have an
audience - whether or not that
audience provides the vital funds
to carry on. The majority of sub-
.. scriptions sold by the Professional
Theatre Program go to the non-
University community, or at least,
to non-students. Although the
perfect audience may be there in
theory, it does not appear in prac-
tice. And only a practicing aud-
ienceTcan make its tastes felt on
)ramatic Techniques I stage.

By JILL CRABTREE
The University Men's Glee Club,
directed by Philip A. Duey, opens
its 108th season this year after
completing a nine-week world
tour.
Made up of University students,
the Glee Club is open to anyone
who auditions successfully. Only
about one-sixth of the members
are enrolled in the School of
Music. Seven other undergraduate
colleges are represented, along
with the schools of law, medicine,
pharmacy, and the Rackham
School of Graduate Studies.
Television Appearances
Because of its many television
appearances and tours, the club
is world-renowned, and has won
many awards.
In 1959, the Glee Club was the
first American male choir to earn
first place at the International
Eisteddfod (music festival) in

states, and by a variety of organi-
zations overseas. They were host-
ed by the Sputnik Youth-Group
Chorus during their stay in Rus-
sia, and stayed with families in
Hong Kong and Bangkok.
All funds for the tour were

raised by the club itself, through
revenues from concerts and var-
ious fund raising activities.
At this writing, the Glee Club
is on its way to Llangollen, Wales,
to compete for the third time in
the music festival there

Llangollen, Wales.
In 1963 the group proved their
win was not a fluke by again
winning the Llangollen trophy.
Last year, the group wound up
their concert season with a sum-
mer tour of 29 major cities in 17
foreign countries. Departing on
May 15, they first toured several
cities in the United States, includ-
ing Denver, San Francisco, Los
Angeles, Honolulu.
Then they departed for Tokyo.
Following their stay there, they
toured Hong Kong, Formosa, New
Delhi, Moscow, Leningrad, Helsin-
ki, Stockholm, Paris and London.
During their tour, the Glee
Club has been honored at recep-
tions by the president of the Re-
public of Manila and the Lord
Mayors of Helsinki and Copen-
hagen.
The group was sponsored by the
University alumni while in the

The Production of "The Blacks" Suggests New Boldness of Casting and L

'U' Glee Club Recently Returned froma
Successful World Tour

COMPETITIVE ATHLETICS:

I-M Program Supplies Recreational Opportunities

By WALLACE IMMEN
Not everyone can make the
varsity team, but the University
still offers you a chance to be a
sports hero in the intramural
program.
And even if you don't want to
be a hero and would just like to
relax after' a hard day of classes

with an informal workout, the IM
facilities are available to every-
one on campus, whether student
or faculty member.
Intramurals offer 24 sports in
9 competitive classifications, each
holding separate championships.
Not all sports are offered in all
divisions, however, with special

line-ups for faculty, individual Applications for these teams must
sports and international center be submitted a month or more in
rivalries., advance of the sport.
Rivalries are most brisk among But a full competitive program

WAA Sponsors Athletics,
Opens Gym to U' Coeds

the large residence hall, social and
professional fraternity and inde-
pendent divisions. But groups can
reserve facilities for team sports
and spirited action may be found
in "pick-up" games as well.
Three non-competitive divisions
offer instruction from experts in
almost every sport, a co-recrea-
tional night once a week and spe-
cial programs for, campus organi-
zations.
Most of the IM facilities are
located in the complex in and
around the IM building, which
stands near Yost fieldhouse. Built
in 1928, the facilities were design-
ed for about half the present stu-
dent enrollment and the program
has b e e n increasingly more
cramped in recent years.
The burden of the overcrowding
is being relieved by limiting the
number of independent teams.

is being offered as usual this year.
The only major sport not offered
is softball, which was eliminated
two years ago because the Univer-
sity's trimester calendar made it
difficult to play spring games,-.It
was impossible to schedule soft-
ball games around football and
baseball.
The student's first competition in
IMs is usually in the residence
halls. Here, an athletic chairman
elected by house members keeps
tabs on the sports coming up and
makes sure the house is repre-
sented by a good team in each
sport,
Making the team often consists
of just signing up, but in the most
popular sports it often means
trying out. Everyone who wants
to, however, can usually find a
position in his favorite sport.
Victims of the overcrowding,

however, are Bursley and Ba
dormitories on North Camp
which cannot play in residen
hall competition. A specially d
signed sport center is provid
near Bursley Hall, and the un
will hold their own competition
The competition is somewh
more intense among the fraterr
ties because some teams ha
been working together for thr
or four years. The teams a
basically formed the same w
other divisions are formed, b
the play is for the honor of t
house.
But, the games must be play
under a set of rules designed
eliminate i n j.u r i e s and ke
sportsmanship at a high level.
The most popular sportsa
also divided into 'A' and 'B' pr
ficiency levels to keep the cor
petition as evenly matched as pc
sible. For the same reason, va
sity athletes are barred from
competition to avoid, "stockin
of the teams.

By MARCY ABRAMSON
University coeds who want judo
or horseback riding or folk danc-
ing lessons should take advantage
of their automatic membership in
the Women's Athletic Association.
"If you are a female and a stu-
dent, you are a member of the
WAA," Nancy Davison, WAA
president, explains.
The WAA began in 1893 and
offered traditional swimming,
tennis, basketball, volleyball and
horseback riding. Programs have
expanded to include judo, riflery,
soccer, field hockey and gym-
nastics.
Increasing interest in . dance
has led to WAA sponsorship of
the Folk, Square and Modern
Dance Clubs.

WAA also sponsors an, exten-
sive extramural competition pro-
grom of speed swimming, field
hockey and tennis. Intramural
competition in various sports is
offered to dorms and sororities.
"Spirit is often a more deter-
mining, factor of winning than
ability in intramurals," Miss Dav-
ison said. "You don't have to be
athletically oriented to be an
active member of WAA."
The WAA also operates Bar-
bour Gymnasium for student use
on "free" activity nights. Students
may use equipment as they
choose.
WAA clubs and activities' are
announced in banners and pos-
ters on the Hill and the Diag.

Il _ _ _ _

save
AT

its
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its
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are
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§
an SPu'en er
In keeping with our established tradition
we offer a wealth of luxurious sports wear
items for the college girl.
Skirts - From England & Scotland - From 21.00
Sweaters - From England & Scotland - From 14.50
§ -Shirts and Blouses -- Finest makers - From 5.95
§
§ Tweed Coats - England's Finest - From 100.00
Rain Coats - Burberry & London Fog - From 37.50
Reversible Coats - England's Finest - From 90.00
d

1 ,. - - - -

YOUR HEADQUARTERS
FOR U of M MUSIC
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN GLEE CLUB:
White Tie and Tails . .. On Toujr
Songs of American Universities
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BAND:
Kick Off, U.S.A. . . . Touchdown, U.S.A.
Hail Sousa . . .On Tour
P.S,. We also have U of M Songbook
suscM( P

ULUICH'S
ANN ARBOR'S FRIENDLY BOOKSTORE

II

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NO 2-0675

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