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September 13, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-13

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4

THE MICHIGAN DAZl.Y

WEDN .tr eSDA, ,SEPTEMI...,.._v... .. __ ._

T .lE ==v Ea v BAT ENEDYyET

3ER 13, 1967

r''

music

Milwaukee

3ernstein's

Mahler Spotty Rights Drive
musical context. Ives', Both formally and melodically T Continue

NEW CHANCE FOR PEACE:
Cambodian Ruler May Break with China

4

By R. A. PERRY
Leonard Bernstein, who along
with John Wayne and Coca Cola
represents exportable American
culture, is a perfect conductor for
Ives and Mahler. Bernstein, flash'
-and vigorous, possesses the driv-
ing energy to reveal Ives' most
complicated textures, and the New
York-Jewish angst to explicate
Mahler's search for serenity. As
his own writing indicates, Bern-
stein is a man of many adjectives;
Ives and Mahler too loved to am-

able to any

caustic wit, such as the blaring
Bronx cheer which ends his Sec-
ond Symphony, is now accepted
with no surprise by the audience
of the sixties. In otherwords, the
Ives renaissance is largely based
upon presumed kitsch, but by an
audience to whom kitsch is not
a derogratory word but High Art.
Ives, however, was not juggling
"Americana" but incorporating
into his music native themes in
which he, as a turn-of-the cen-

the Second Symphony, composed
between 1897 and 1901, is an easy
work to listen to, and Ives' in-
junction to "use your ears like
a man" does not have to be exer-
cised greatly for this work. Ex-

Father Groppi Shuns
Governor's Request
To Stop Marches

Daily News Analysis
By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press Special Correspondent
Unpredictable Prince Norodom
Sihanouk, ruler of Cambodia,
shows signs of being disillusioned
with Red China, which he has
often called his "sincere friend."
The disenchantment could add a
new dimension to the search for
peace in Vietnam.

The prince's quarrel with Peking
has developed slowly for a year
and a half. He made an effort
to placate Red China, but evident-
ly felt constant pressure in the
form of subversion threatening not
only his rule but the involvement
of Cambodia in widened war in
Southeast Asia.
Only a little more than a year

plify themes in rich embellish- tury New Englander, was sincerely
ments. immersed. An after-hours com-
In the fifties, the music' of poser, he wrote not merely poly-
Charles Ives would have been tonal gimcrackery but music
called kitsch. Today, a pop-art searching to express his New Eng-
trained audience greets the hym- land environment and questioning
nal and folk quotations constantly with humor its modern facade.
emerging from Ives' music as His quartets especially reveal the
authentic Americana quite adapt- serious demeanor.
Auto Price Hike Creates
Hurdle for Strike Talks1

pressing "the musical feelings of MILWAUKEE (IP--Gov. Warren
the Connecticut country in the P. Knowles called yesterday for
1890's . . . the tunes they sang an end to Milwaukee's violent
and played then," the symphony open housing demonstrations, but
excerpts "America the Beautiful," the man who has guided the
"Turkey in the Straw," "Camp- marathon marches for 15 consec-
town Races," and especially, as a utive nights declared they'll go on
thematic focus, 'Columbia the even if such a law is adopted.
Gem of the Ocean." "When we get this, we will
It is easy, of course to detect turn to other areas," said Father
the latter tune, with whichIves James E. Groppi, the white Ro-
wasehaman Catholic priest who is ad-
was somewhat obsessed, when it viser to the Milwaukee Youth
it is surpris ng ho tromne Council of the NAACP, sponsor
itu isusurpindhowthecompsdeof the campaign for a city open
could quote, intermix, and shade occupancy measure.
these folk tunes in the most sub-
tle and almost unnoticeable ways. Vicious Cycle'

Sihanouk has found Cambodia ago Sihanouk vowed publicly that$
is no exception to the Peking rule, "I will remain the friend of the
which these days seems to be Socialist camp and especially Chi-
fightin with practically everybody. na's friend," despite his complaints
But with what appears to be con- of activities of Communists in his
siderable alarm. Sihanouk has fir- own nation. Now he seems to have
ed two pro-Chinese ministers and been goaded to action, smarting
suspended several newspapers. under a Peking charge that he is
Southern Governors Push
Upgraded Negro Education

"reactionary" and a tool of Rus-
sians and Americans.
This comes after elections which
lend an air of legality to the Sai-
gon regime. Perhaps the door has
been opened a tiny bit to efforts
to improve relations between 'Jam -
bodia and the Saigon government'
and possibly, in the long run. to
the establishment of a United Na-
tions presence in Indochina.
The Cambodian - Vietnamese
frontier of 736 miles and the pres-
ence of 600,000 ethnic Khmers,
Cambodians in South Vietnam,
have had an impact on the war.
Saigon has complained that Cam-
bodia provided sanctuary for the
Viet Cong and an infiltration
route for North Vietnamese troops.
Sihanouk in turn has accused Sai-
gon and the Americans of vio-
lating his borders. Several years
ago he broke relations with both.
More Hope for UN
In 1964, the UN Security Coun-
cil sent a three-man commission
to Cambodia with an eye to es-
tablishing whether it really was
an infiltration route, whether the
border was being violated by the
South Vietnamese and whether the
United Nations might in some
way supervise the demarcation
line. But the mission, however,
turned out to be futile.
If Sihanouk becomes sufficient-
ly frightened of Chinese designs,
matters could change. The Sai-
gon elections could serve as a
basis for seeking better relations
with South Vietnam and the
Americans.
In a mood of anger with China,

Sihanouk might be less averse to
having a UN team reactivated.
Such a small step could be an im--
portant one toward establishing a
UN presence in the general area.
Sihanouk speaks constantly of
his troubles with the "reds" and
the "blues." By "Reds" he means
pro - Chinese, by "blues," pro-
Americans. He exhibits hostility
to both now. But in the past he
has conceded there are some
"good" Americans. He has sin-
gled out, for example, Mike Mans-
field of Montana, the Senate Dem-
ocratic leader and proponent of
UN involvement in Vietnam.
Clearly, for many months, Si-
hanouk has nursed forebodings
about the Communists, even while
making friendly gestures toward
North Vietnam, which he calls
the "Viet Minh" as distinguished
from the South's Viet Cong.
Fears Communists
But to his own Communists a
year ago, Sihanouk said that "if
you remain international Commu-
nists and seek to support the
Viet Minh and others, I must con-
tinue to resist you," He blasted the
"stupid Pathet Lao" Communists
of Laos for claiming a strip of
Cambodian territory, and express-
ed suspicion that North Vietnam
had similar territorial designs.
There have been hints in Si-,
hanouk's statements that he feels
himself hemmed in by the com-
bination of North Vietnamese, La-
otian, Thai and Chinese Commu-
nists. If he remains wholly hos-
tile to South Vietnam and the
Americans, he could be isolated
completely, with no place to turn.

q

DETROIT P)- An increase in
car prices yesterday was a new
factor in the labor-management
equation as negotiators prepared
to resume bargaining between the
struck Ford Motor Co. and the
United Auto Workers (UAW).
Chrysler Corp., citing increased
costs of labor and'new health
and safety items required by fed-
eral law, became on Monday the
first of the four major U.S. auto-
makers to announce a price in-
crease. It said 1968 models would,
cost an average of $133 or 4.6 per
cent more than in 1967.
General Motors, American RIo-
tors and Ford Motor Co. are also
readying higher price listings on
their new models, but it was not
immediately known when their,
prices will be announced.
UAW Won't Comment
Ford and the UAW have agreed
to return to the bargaining table
Friday in an effortto end a six-
day-old strike by 160,000 Ford
workers.
The UAW had no immediate
comment on Chrysler's announce-
ment, but it was expected to study
the new listings carefully to get
an indication of what kind of sec-
ond contract offer the company
might make.
The union has rejected the
nearly identical offers made by
the Big Three. One GM official
estimated the original offer would
add $4 an hour to the $4.70 an
hour in wages and fringe benefits
the average worker now draws.
Price Complications
.The Big Three offers included
raising the current average
straight time hourly rate of $3.41
an hour by 13 cents the first year
and by 2.8 per cent each successive
year.
The strike is not expected to
delay Ford's new price announce-
ment since the company already
has 85,000 new models ready for
introduction by dealers Sept. 22.
The pricing picture was com-
plicated by the fact that auto
companies traditionally s h i f t
equipment around on cars. An
item which might have been op-
tional on the 1967 model and was
made standard this time would be
reflected in the higher 1968 price
tag.
The Chrysler announcement
marked the second year in a row
that prices have been upped.

Both 'Ford and Chrysler rolled
back their prices last year after
General Motors announced a list
far lower. Chrysler's revised prices
:were still $86,99 or 2.82 per cent
higher after the rollback.
With the announcement that
'Ford and the UAW would not re-
turn to the bargaining table until
Friday, some observers speculated
that the strike, which began at
midnight last Wednesday, will run
at least until October.
Polish Talks
Hand Failr
a lr
To De Gaulle
WARSAW, Poland (M)-Rebuffed
in efforts to steer Poland to more
independent policies, Charles de
Gaulle flew home yesterday after
signing a joint communique re-
flecting Polish-French disagree-
ment on the great issues of Eu-
rope.
The statement covering the
French president's six-day visit
did not even uphold. permanent
Polish rule over the Oder-Neisse
region, former German lands
transferred to Poland at the end
of World War II.
De Gaulle has backed the Poles
on this issue ever since 1959 and
did so with new force during his
visit. But he did not put it in
writing-perhaps because he was
afraid of dividing Europe.
Ignoring de Gaulle's proposal
to develop a broader perspective,
to depend less on Moscow and to
act fointly with France to end the
given so little Polish support for
his own proposals for Warsaw
for Poland to join France in
trying to end the war, the joint
statement announced agreement
that the Vietnam conflict is "the
principal obstacle to international
relaxation."-
Poland and France, it said,
"condemn a war whose escalation
continues to menace the very ex-
istence of the Vietnamese people
and compromise the security of
neighboring countries. They are
convinced that only an end to for-
eign intervention and a return to:
the 1954 Geneva agreements will
permit ending the conflict."

Not all tune and pazzazz, the Sec-
ond Symphony holds an Adagio
Cantabile of great serenity and
simplicity.
This first concert of the Uni-
versity Musical Society's 89th sea-
son opened with a disappointing
performance of Mahler's Fourth
Symphony. For those put off by
the endless repetitiveness of Mah-
ler's longer and more grandiose
symphonies, the shorter Fourth
Symphony offers a most pleasant
way to enjoy this keenly sensitive
and original composer. In it, Mah-
ler seems to have escaped his soul-

!"There are many aspects to
this fight-education, jobs, hous-
ing and police," Father Groppi
added. "It is a vicious cycle that
must be cracked."
Knowles flew into Milwaukee for
a brief visit and told newsmen
that he was appealing to Father
Groppi to "adopt a positive ap-
proach toward improving condi-
tions in the Inner Core."
The governor said that Father
Groppi should realize that "there
is no instant solution . . these
people have got to work.

1c1 cc11a U 11vc ca'acu 110 vidViolence Continues
struggles and paints a serene pic-
ture of what one critic has called "He would get plenty of com-
"a child's heaven." munity and financial support if
The music flows naturally, even he listed a number of projects for
Theusich flosgtuallymeven the inner city and set about car-
throgn the sligyacrne rying them out," Knowles said. "It
scherzo, and the dynamic range is time we open a dialogue on
is comparatively slight. Bernstein, improving conditions in the Inner
a Mahler specialist, time andI Core."
again retarded this flow and made T -e
dynamic peaks unnecessarily mel- Thirty-eight persons, most of
odramatic. Retarding and then them white, were arrested Monday
releasing the music, Bernstein night when some 650 civil rights
broke the natural momentum of demonstrators aiming at repeat-
brke pe n ring their Sunday foray into the
the piece. South Side were halted by a
Lucidity is a highly valuable perilous confrontation with more
characteristic in a performance; than 1000 hostile white counter-

ASHEVILLE, N.C. (R) - The
Southern Governor's ConferenceI
,approved yesterday a blueprint for
the upgrading of Negro educa-
tional opportunities in the South,
The action, the prime event of
the 17-state conference, came in
the form of official approval of a
report prepared by a special com-
mission of the Southern Regional
Education Board. The board made
these three main points:
-That immediate steps be tak-
en to help Negro college students
overcome the handicaps of educa-
tional disadvantages and cultural
deprivation;
--That long range plans be de-
vised to complete the evolution of
the South's dual system of higher
education into a single system
serving all students;
-That all types of educational
resources, including traditionally
Negro colleges and universities, be
engaged in a massive effort to

achieve equality of educational
opportunity.
Georgia's Democratic Governor
G eorge Maddox offered the only
argument against the report, say-
ing it had no place on the agenda
of the conference. He added, "I
had hoped the race issue would
not be injected into this meting."
Governors Mills E. Godwin of
Virginia, Robert McNair of South
Carolina and Winthrop Rockefel-
ler of Arkansas, among others,
praised the report. Godwin said,
"This is the best way proposed
yet to get something started in
this problem area. It is a real
landmark report."
Rockefeller said consideration
should be included "for the en-
vironment of our Negro students.
They may receive an education
equal to a white student, but they
still have a different environment.
While we upgrade education, let
us all learn to understand the
tremendous part played by en-
vironmental background."

PRESENTS
JANUS FILMS PRESENTS THE ARCTURUS COLLECTION
DIRECT FROM NEW YORK'S PHILHARMONIC HALL
a collection of brilliant short films
by the directors of the 60's (& 701s)
I 9

I

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inner parts of course must be
clearly heard, especially in this
work of endless minutiae in the
winds and brass. Instead of seem-
ing an integral part of the whole,l
however, each solo strove to be
on top, up-staging so to speak,
andethe resulting ultra-expres-
siveness, while at first seeming
commendable, gradually proved
to vitiate the true cohesiveness
and flow of the work. The seconda
movement was especially tedious.
Phone 434-0130
Edtance O WCARPENTER R4A
OPEN 7:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
" PI
TECMICOLOR* Shown at 8:15 Only
ALSO ...
tAlIAMONT
P4CgURES P N
LAWAA
Shown at
10:10 Only
PLUS-
"WAY UP AND WAY OUT"
COLOR CARTOON

demonstrators.

This Week at
1421 H i ll Street

4

CINEMA II
Presents
SIMONE SIGNORE
YVES MONTAND
'The
Sleeping

THURSDAY,
SEPT. 14
FRIDAY,
SEPT. 15
SATURDAY,
SEPT. 16

ASHOK TALWAR
Playing the SITAR and singing
INDIAN classical and folk music
THE JOHN MILLER
JAZZ TRIO
Three from the U. of M. Band
THE BIG SANDY BOYS
The best BLUEGRASS in Michigan

iA ~ne'.

I

PROGRAM NO. 1

Car
Murder
(1 965)
First-rate thriller!"
-N.Y. Herald Tribune

L

...

i

!1

FRIDAY and
SATURDAY
7and 9:15 P.M.
Auditorium AC
Angell Hall50
~ ~1

Enter Hamlet Fred Mogubgub, U.S.A.
Renaissance Walerian Borowczyk, Poland
Les Mistons '67 Francois Truffaut, France
Running, Jumping, and Standing Still Film
Richard Lester, England
Two Castles Bruno Bozzetto, Italy
The Fat and the Lean Roman Polanski, Poland
Corrida Interdite Denys Colomb de Daunant, France
Allures Jordan Belson, U.S.A.
La Jet6e Chris Marker, France
All Weekend-Thurs. thru Sunday
SEPT. 14-17
Architecture AuditoriUm
7 & 9 P.M.
(Note: due to high rentql prices, admission
will be one dollar)

4

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'AfIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION

I

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NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
START FOX EASTERN THEATRES G
TODAY FOX VILLGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-.769-1300

FEATURE
TIMES:
1:30-3-:25-
5:20-7:10-
9:10

COMING
SEPT. 20th

OX EASTERN THEATRES
FX0H VILLAGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"769-1300

Fisrt Time
at
Popular Prices

"ONE OF THE OUTSTANDING FILMS OF THE YEARI"
-Detroit Free Press
JOSEPH E. LEVINE,..
SHIR.EY MacLAINE
. 'ALAN ARKIN
ROSSANO BRAZZI
MICHAEL CAINE
VITTORIO GASSMAN
:r .PETER SELLERS
.,ARTHUR COH.wNs
VITTORIO De SICA';

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THE MIRISCH CORPORATION PRESENTS
J ULIE ANDREWS-MAX VON SYDOW RICHARD HARRIS
in THE GEORGE ROY HILL WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION o"HAWAIIPANAviSION' COLORby DeLuxe

I

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IN PERSON

PETER NERO

ff4FTdwmq4bimr.mmL- -A berk,

m w~~~~ ~ ~ - ~~~. -~ i ,N .~~ ~ILI~!~L~II

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III

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