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September 07, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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dance
Paxton 'Sizes' and 'Satisfies'
In Ann Arbor Advance Guard

GI's Send
Marijuana
Home by Mail
PHILADELPHIA (R'-U.S. Cus-
toms agents say the war in Viet-
nam has generated a new prob-
lem: servicemen illegally mailing
packages of marijuana home to
family and friends.

CLAIMS 'BRAINWASHING':
U.S. Officials Deny Romney Charges

By ROBERT SHEFF activities seemingly about the
Steve Paxton's dance concert parameters of measurement and
last night at the Fifth Dimension transformation in everyday life.
was the avant-garde dark horse As the lights came up, a large pre-
of the year. sketched map of Wisconsin, Min-

For Ann Arborites who have not,
been treated to American experi-
mental art and theatre since the
1965 "Once Festivals," Paxton's
dance events were a far cry from
the usual Martha Graham circuit.
Although the space of the Fifth
Dimension is somewhat unsuitable
for the performance of dance
theatre, Paxton organized forty
local Ann Arbor participants for
a program which interchanged the
subtle, the everyday, and the ab-
stract.
The first event, "The Sizes"
(1967) was a series of images. and

nesota, and the Dakotas was
stretched across the floor. Several
local artist then went on-all-fours
traversing the area and painting
in more highways and landmarks
while a group of six persons read
from personal and public trav-
elogues. These persons then joined
the others on the map. Several
girls filed out and on signal began
changing clothes with their part-
ners (presumably c o m p a r i n g
"sizes" and styles).
The dance then continued this
subtle integration of common ac-
tion and "deeper meaning": a
woman stood for a long time next,

Statistical Expert Charges
Abortion Figures Inflated

to a cardboard box so that one
could compare their "sizes"; sev-
eral slide projectors cast All-
American images of national park
sights and old missions, etc., on
a blackboard while artists chalked
in parts of the images, giving the
same sensation as visiting old
ruins and seeing the marks of for-
mer times. The medical histories
of two persons were broadcast
giving detail and measurements of
their diseases while various peo-
ple in tube-like costumes walked
about. The smiles of a line of
women faded into blank expres-
sions. The piece ended after the
shadows of five standing women
were painted in on brown paper.
"A.A." (a piece for audience)
was a 12-minute tape of a jet
flight with the voices of a stew-
ardess and a pilot. The possible ef-
fect of this piece could be the
same as when considering the
turning of the earth while one
stands still. Because of its brevity,
the tape fell short of this target.
Travel perhaps may be the art
medium of coming generations.,
Excerpt from "Earth Interior"
(1966) was a lecture-piece on the
anatomy of the human walk. It
was powerfully delivered by archi-
tect Johesp Whrer as he dragged
semi-spasdic manchild Paxton
through doors and around corners.
The Dramatic Arts Center, whose
grant program has aided enter-
prising artists since 1964, did wise-
ly in choosing All-American Pax-
ton to organize the first of hope-
fully many avant-garde presenta-
tions for the Ann Arbor scene.

Four cases are pending in tary and diplomatic establish-
Philadelphia-one involving about ments said Romney was only in
-nine pounds of "the finest mari- South Vietnam four days, that he
juana I've seen in my 15 years as spent three of them on field trips
an agent," agent Robert Clemens outside Saigon and that with the
a otheragovernors hPnwas iven only u

SAIGON (P)-Ruffled by Gov.
George Romney's charge that he
was brainwashed in Vietnam, U.S.
officials pointed out yesterday that
nine other governors were with
Romney on his 1965 visit and
none of them have publicly made
any such complaints.
Members of the American mili-

"When I came back from Viet-
nam," Romney replied, "I just
had the greatest brainwashing
that anybody can get when you go
over to Vietnam. Not only by the
generals but also by the diplomatic
corps over there, and they do a
very thorough job."
Romney said that since then
he had delved into Vietnamese:
history and "I have changed my;
mind in that particularly I no,
longer believe that it was neces-
sary for us to get involved in:
South Vietnam to stop Commu-
nist aggression in Southeast Asia
and to prevent Chinese Commu-
nist domination of Southeast
Asia."
A spokesman for the U.S. Em-
bassy said the embassy received
the 10 governors-six Republicans
and four Democrats-"as official

economic situation, the political est view of Vietnam" and added:
situation and other aspects of "We do not know their reactions."
the Vietnamese problem. The military spokesman said
"Any judgment on the quality the group got the same informa-
of the briefings is one for the in- tion that would have been given
dividual governors to make them- any such group of ranking Amer-
selves," he added, noting that the Ican officials.
governors were personally briefed On his departure from Saigon
by then-Ambassador Henry Cabot on Nov. 8. 1965, Romney told news-
Lodge, a Republican. men:
The group also was briefed by "I have supported the Vietnam
Gen. William C. Westmoreland, policy and did so following the
commander of U.S. forces in Viet- White House conference the gov-
nam. A spokesman for Westmore- ernors had with the President in
land said the command provided July. However, this visit has con-
briefings and field trips in order firmed the soundness of the sup-
to give the governors "the broad- port I extended."

WASHINGTON ()-A statisti-
cal expert said yesterday some
supporters of liberalized abortion
laws use vastly inflated figures on
the number of deaths from illegal
abortions to scare people into
backing their cause.:
Dr. Christopher Ti'etze, calling
estimates of such deaths that
range bewteen 5,000 and 10,000
"unmitigated nonsense," said the.
estimated one million illegal abor-
tions yearly result in only about
500 deaths.
The higher estimates are made
by "people who feel in order to
raise sympathy for liberalized
abortion laws they have to make
people afraid," 'he told a news
briefing at the International Con-.
ference 'on Abortion.
Tietze, associate director of they
biomedical division of the Popu-
lation Council of New York, said
he favors, scrapping all laws
against abortion and making. it
available:toany women wishing it.
-Tietze also said proposals to
legalize abortion in cases where
the mother's. health is affected,
where the baby might be defective
or in' cases of pregnancy. due to
rape or incest "would not have a
terrific impact" on the number
of legal abortions. He explained
that many women seek abortions
for entirely different reasons.
"Most abortions," Prof. Louis B.
Schwartz of. the University of
Pennsylvania law school said in a
paper presented to a closed ses-
sion of the conference, "are sought
by married women who may have
a number of children and want
no more, or by unmarried women
over the 'age of consent,' or by
married women. who find them-
selves pregnant after the husband
has deserted or been killed, where
the prospective mother faces the
prospect of raising a fatherless
child while working for a living.".
Schwartz and Prof. Kenneth J.

Ryan, chairman of the Depart-
ment of Obstetrics and Gynecol-
ogy at the Case-Western Reserve
University School of Medicine in
Cleveland, agreed existing laws
a g a i n s t abortions discriminate
against the poor.
"Total repression of abortion
causes thousands of women to risk
death in procuring illegal abor-
tions, and millions of women to
suffer imposition and degradation
at the hands of criminal abor-
tionists," Schwartz said.

said yesterday.
The marijuana, if cut with to-
bacco as it usually is, would have
a market value of about $12,000,
said James J. McClung; another
agent.
The marijuana was found dur-
ing a routine postal inspection of
a package allegedly sent home by
Curtis Hunter, 21, of West Phila-
delphia, said Clemens.
Hunter was being discharged
from the Army and the material
was found stuffed in pillows he
was mailing home to his sister,
Julie Ann, 19. The two are free
now on $500 bond each after be-
ing charged with smuggling mari-
juana.
The package was delivered the
day after Hunter had returned
from Vietnam and customs agents
followedthe postman to the door,
Clemens said.
"This has become a very preva-
lent thing with servicemen," Mc-
Clung said in an interview. "We're
gettin gclobbered with marijuana
cases all over the country, not,
just in Philadelphia."
Many mailings from servicemen,,
who canobtain marijuana easily,
in South Vietnam, may contain
marijuana and got through unde-
tected because only a certain per-
centage of mail is examined, he
said.
"Packages are selected at ran-
dom," said McClung. "It was just
luck that these people got
caught."
Another case, he cited involved
a 24-year-old North Philadelphia
woman, who received from her
brother a package containing 51,
marijuana cigarettes with in-
structions to give them to a third
party.

10

The undeclared candidate for visitors and arranged for the ap-
the 1968 Republican nomination propriate briefings and arranged
was asked why he had changed for them to get out in the field
his earlier view that U.S. involve- and to meet Vietnamese officials."
ment in Vietnam was morally He said the governors received
right and necessary. standard briefings on the war, the
Charge Gree Military
Coerced Two Witnessesa

!

THEY'RE GOING TO STEAL THE CROWN JEWELS.

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T T rTW 7 :
S aS.AA AALS.JA StC.ron4$A 4444

the standard VIP treatment.
Romney's statements in a tele-
vision interview Monday night
were front-paged in Saigon's Eng-
lish-language newspapers and al-
so reached the U.S. Embassy and
military. command on news serv-
ice wires.

NOW SHOWING

WASHINGTON (P) - Two men
who said they had been slated to
serve as key witnesses against
Andreas Papandreou said yester-
day they had been forced by Greek
police to give fabricated state-
ments.
Andreas Vachliotis, a lawyer,
and Kyriakos Diakogiannis, a
journalist, told a news confer-
ence they are repudiating their
statements. They said their tes-
zimony was to have been used in
the treason trial planned by the
Greek military junta against Pap-
andreou.
Papandreou, a former economics
professor at the University of Cal-
ifornia, gave up his U.S. citizen-
ship to return to Greece. He is
the son of George Papandreou,
a former premier of Greece.
The news conference was call-
ed by Ramparts magazine, which
claims to have helped the two men
escape from Greece in advance of
Papandreou's trial, contends the

A general organizational meet-
ing for the new "Vietnam Fall"
project will be held tonight at 8
p.m. in Aud.. A, David Gordon, co-
ordinator, said yesterday. People'
who led Vietnam Summer groups
will speak on projects' for this se:.
mester. These include work on the
Peacemobile, a referendum on Vi-
etnam, teach-ins, the draft and
counseling for 'conscientious ob-
jectors.
. *
Richard Armour, one of Amer-
ica's most widely read writers of
humor and satire will present the
1967 McInally lecture sponsored
by the Graduate School of Busi-
ness Administration. The public
lecture will be at 4 p.m. next
Thursday, Sept. 14 in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
* *, *
James A. Hoeh has been named
a consultant in the University
Bureau of School Services. He re-
places Wendell C. Boersma, who
resigned to accept a position at
the University of Iowa.
Hoeh wil consult with elemen-
tary schools in the' state in con-

nection with administration and'
supervise the bureau's statewide
student leadership and studentĀ°
council training programs.
A uniform code which will "shift
probate and estate laws away from
their present orientation toward
what people want and need" has
been proposed for the United!
States according to Prof. Richard
V. Wellman of the Law School.
Prof. Wellmann headed the com-
mittee which drafted the Uniform
Probate Code.
* *
Alexander' Eckstein, director of
Center for Chinese Studies and
professor of economics, has been
named by the American Council
of Learned Societies as a member
of the planning group on com-
parative Communist studies.
The Institute of Continuing Le-
gal Education will present a two-
day program on "Creative Busi-
ness Financing" tomorrow and
Saturday, Sept. 8-9 in Rackham
Lecture Hall. At least 19 nation-
ally known authorities will discuss
the financial and legal advice ne-
cessary to take maximum advant-
age of available credit sources,
with minimum loss of control.

evidence against Papandreou was
framed with false evidence.
Vachliotis andsDiakogiannis told
the news conference that both
the charge against Papandreou
and the coup which put the mili-
tary junta in power were parts
of a plot by the KYP, the Greek
secret police, to end democracy
in Greece.
They appealed to President
Johnson not to give military or
any other aid to the junta, which
seized power in Athens April 21.
They also criticized Greece's
King Constantine,, who is sched
uled to visit Washington next
Monday. They said Constantine
could overthrow the junta by tak-
ing a strong stand against it, but
added he lacks courage to oppose'
the military.
Phone 434-0130
Ent.,"-!ieC)MPPMTER RODB
OPEN 7:30 P.M.GNOW SHOWING
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GARNER-ANDREWS
MELVYN JAMES
DOUGLAS - COBURN
Shown '~ a ftFMWAYs
he nA ECTURE '
8:25 '1 heAme c'aon R RLAS
Only ofEm~y}
ALSO...
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BESTI"
_____________________-N.Y. Post
Sidney
Shinier in ICH
Winters__
Shown at
10:30 only IN PANAVISIONO
PL US--
"FOOTBALL ROYAL"
COLOR CARTOON

MICHAEL CRAWFO RD*" OUVER REED:
HARRY ANDREWS
in ,
AEA AHCNICLORA
JAMES DONALD
DANIEL MASSEY MICHAEL HQOEBlN GADRIEU I 101I LiTE TARP?

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The year's No. 1 best seller picks you
up and never lets you down!
In Technocolor
Starri
Academy Aard SANDY ENNIS
Winner

Screnpay by DICK CLEMENTand IAN LA FRENAIS - Fron an ongeal story by MICHAEL WINNER
Dectd by MICHAEL WINNER - Produced by MAURICE FOSTER and BEN ARBEID
A Gib RSC':ITAR PRUCVCTi0N - A UNIVERSAL RELEASE
Sunday 7, 9:,05 11 :10 P.M.
Mon. Labor Day Only, 6, 8:05, 10:10P.M.
Tues.-Thurs. 7, 9:05 P.M.
Also-
Academy Award Nominee Short
"THE-ROAD TO ST TROPEZ"

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