100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 01, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER Y, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE 'T

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 196~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE '1

Senate G
Bombing

roup

Urges

Haiphong

Committee
Contradicts
McNamara
Prepared To Risk
Conflict With China
Over Air Attacks
WASHINGTON (A)-An immed-
iate increase in bombing of all
important military targets in
North Vietnam-even if it risks
war with Communist China-was
recommended unanimously yes-
terday by the Senate preparedness
subcommittee.
Critical of McNamara
In an interim report sharply cri-
tical of Secretary of Defense Rob-
ert S. McNamara, the senators
asked bombinb of the key North
Vietnamese supply port of Hai-
phong and bombing of all other
meaningful military targets in an
effort to shorten the costly war.
While the subcommittee report
hit directly at McNamara, Sen.
Mike 'Mansfield (D-Mont.) em-
phasized to the Senate in advance
of its release that McNamara
speaks for President Johnson.
Mansfield, the Senate Demo-
cratic leader, said he is ,disturbed
by published attacks on the in-
tegrity and policies of McNamara.
'Attacks on LBJ'
"These in reality are attacks on
the President of the United
States," Mansfield said, noting
that McNamara acts under orders
of the President as commander in
chief.
McNamara testified before the
subcommittee last week that in-
creased bombing could not by it-
self win or shorten the war, and
that the final victory must be
won by ground forces in South
Vietnam.
The subcommittee report said
"We cannot, in good conscience,
ask our ground forces to continue
their fight in South Vietnam un-
less we are prepared to press the
air war in the North in the most
effective way possible."
'Apply Required Force'
"What is needed now," the re-
port said, "is the hard decision to
do whatever is necessary, take the
risks that have to be taken, and
apply the force that is required to
see the job through."
In answer to McNamara's warn-
ing against widening the war to
involve Communist China or So-
viet Russia, Sen. John Stennis (D-
Miss), the subcommittee chair-
man, noted that "certain risks be-
came inevitable" when this coun-
try decided in 1965 to send in its
own combat forces.
Much of the 20-page document
cited sharp differences between
McNamara and what the subcom-
mittee said were the unanimous
recommendations of the Joint
Chief of Staff and other top mili-
tary leaders.
Since Aug. 8, the Armed Serv-
ices preparedness investigating
subgroup has listened to testimony
from senior military leaders on the
war in Vietnam.
It also heard McNamara's de-
tailed defense of restrictions im-
posed on the air war by the John-
son administration. Much of Mc-
Namara's testimony clashed with
that of the military leaders.
Delay in Bombing
"More than 600 planes have
been shot down over North Viet-
nam," the committee report said.
p "The long delay in approving tar-
gets has almost certainly cr~tri-
outed to our aircraft and pilot
losses since it gave the North
Vietnamese the time to build up
formidable air defenses.
Delay also enabled the enemy to

establish alternate storage and re-
serve stocks before targets were
hit, the report added.

SEC Moves.
To Control
Manipulation
Rising Stock Prices
Cause Apprehension
In House CommitteeI
WASHINGTON (P)-The Sec-r
urities and Exchange Commissiont
disclosed yesterday it is conduct-
ing at least 100 formal investiga-i
tions into possible manipulation
of stock prices during recenta
heavy trading.
The disclosure came in a lettert
to Chairman Harley O. Staggers
(D-W.Va.) of the House Com-k
merce Committee who requestedt
reports from the commission andt
the New York and American stockt
exchanges on action taken to curb
"a serious level of speculative ac-
tivity."
Chairman Manuel F. Cohen of
the SEC said, "We have viewed
with some apprehension price fluc-
tuations in certain securities which
do not appear to reflect any sig-
nificant developments in the$
operations or prospects of the is-
suers."
'Considerable Concern'
Recent activity in both exchange'
and over-the-counter markets,
Cohen continued, is giving the
commission "considerable con-
cern." A huge increase in trading
volume has frequently been ac-
companied by sharply rising prices
in medium and lower priced
stocks, he added. A
Cohen said the commission has
steped up its surveillance and in-
vestigations in an attempt to pre-
vent manipulation, overreaching
or other unfair practices.
Cohen gave neither the number
of investigations nor the names
of securities under investigation.
Commission officials, who also de-
clined to name names, said at least
100 inquiries-a "very substantial"
number-are under way.
Cohen said also the commission
has begun inspecting brokerage
firms active in speculative issues
traded on the American Exchange.
Will Not Halt Speculation
"The investor who wishes to
buy or sell securities on a short-
term basis or without full infor-
mation probably will do so regard-,
les of the actions taken by the
Commission or the self-regulatory
institutions," Cohen said.
"Our function is to attempt,
with the resources available to
us, to make-sure the markets are
operating fairly and honestly and
that reliable information is readily
available for the use of investors
and their advisers."
Cohen said the commission is
giving special attention this year
to trading by institutions, includ-
ing mutual funds.

KHARTOUM, Sudan (A) - The
Arab summit meeting limped to-
ward its close yesterday with
Egypt apparently falling in step
with those ready for a political
rather than a military solution to
the problems of the Middle East.;
President Gamal Abdel Nasser
indicated Egypt for the time be-
ing is in no shape to embark on
a fresh military offensive to re-
gain territory lost to Israel in
the June war.
The Arab nations now should
build up their strength and direct
their efforts to "eliminate the
traces of Israeli aggression" to-
ward the diplomatic field, Nasser
suggested Wednesday.
But there is no indication that

he is ready to negotiate with Is-i
rael either directly or indirectly.
His intention, say conference'
sources, is to enlist international
sympathy for the Arab cause and
there is no sign that he has aband-
oned dreams of revenge by force
of arms.
Nasser's agreement early yester-
day to solve the long-standing
feud between Egypt and Saudi
Arabia over Yemen was seen as a
move to conserve his strength
and cut already heavy economic
losses resulting from the war.
The agreement to pull Egyptian
troops from Yemen in return for
a Saudi Arabian halt to its assist-j
ance to Yemen's Royalist rebels
was in danger of foundering.

President Obdullah Sallal of Re-
publican Yemen virtually rejected
the peace bid and his delegation
leaked the information that mem-
bers of three-nation commission
set up to supervise its implemen-
tation might even be refused visas
to visit the country. The nations
are Sudan, Iraq and Morocco.
Delegates yesterday turned to
economic matters, with impover-
ished Egypt and Jordan appealing
for assistance from their oil-rich
brothers. The oil-rich states were
reported reluctant to supply the
cash.
Jordan's King Hussein has gone
out of his way during the meeting
to gain the sympathy of the Arab
states and is suspected of pre-
paring the way for some separate
negotiation -with his Israeli neigh-
bors. There is nothing to confirm
this, however.
"It is a feeling he has given us
rather than anything concrete
that he has said," remarked one
delegate.
It was reported that Nasser and
President Abdel Rahman Aref of
Iraq were receptive, at least in
part, to a peace plan for the Mid-
dle East proposed by President
Tito of Yugoslavia. But Syria, ab-
sent at this week's conference has
refused to go along with Tito.

SUMMIT ENDS:
Arabs Seek Political Solutions;
Egypt Asks Neighbors for Aid

I

U.S. Steel Raises Prices
Despite Federal Request

-Associated Press
UNITED AUTO WORKERS PRESIDENT Walter P. Reuther flanked by three of his top aides,
accused the Big Three automakers of a conspiracy to thwart collective bargaining and charged
that the industry was "trying to provoke a strike" at a press conference yesterday.
UAW To Select Strike Target;
General Motors Likely Choice

DETROIT (P) - United Auto
Workers President Walter P.
Reuther said yesterday he would
name today the automaker that
his union will bargain with in
efforts to write a pattern-setting
industry labor contract.
Selection of the company will
come just six days before current
three-year contracts expire at
General Motors, Ford and Chrys-
ler, the industry's Big Three.
Contracts expire at midnight
Wednesday at all three, but only
the company picked as a target
would be struck if no agreement
is reached or extension granted.
Reuther's announcement at a
news conference came a few hours
after the UAW councils represent-
ing nationwide workers at the
three companies urged calling a
special convention to beef up its
$67 million strike fund.
The action increased speculation
GM would be the target. The fund
as it stands now would support a
strike at GM for several weeks,
Ford 18 weeks and Chrysler a little
more than six months.
The announcement also followed
reports that the union asked the
separate companies Wednesday
night -whether they were willing
to extend the contract.
All three companies reportedly
said no. GM employs 375,000 mem-
bers; Ford 152,000 and Chrysler
100,000.

First economic offers in current
negotiations, which started July
10, came last Tuesday from all
three companies. The offers were
practically identical and were
promptly labeled "inadequate" by
union negotiating teams at each
company.
One company spokesman said
the offers would increase a typical
worker's pay by $1,700 over a pro-
posed three-year contract.
The three UAW councils, rep-
resenting plants of the Big Three
across the country, adopted iden-
I

tical resolutions Thursday saying
that "the possibility of strike ac-
tion in the 1967 negotiations may
now become a reality."
"Such strike action will represent
no threat to national defense. It
will pose no threat to the national
health or safety."
"If the auto industry persists
in its refusal to grant the equity
to which we are entitled, we shall
not hesitate to use the last resort
available to workers in a free so-
ciety-the right to withhold our
work effort," the councils said in
their resolutions.

PITTSBURGH, Pa. (P) -Giant
U.S. Steel Corp. raised prices on
steel bars yesterday ii the face of
government pressure to avoid
further boosts.
Garner Ackley, President John-
son's chief economic advisor, had
dispatched telegrams to the na-
tion's steelmakers after Republic
Steel Corp. of Cleveland, Ohio, in-
itiated the third increase on steel
products in a month with a 1.8
per cent hike on steel bars
Wednesday.
U.S. Steel, the nation's largest
producer, said "very thoughtful
attention was given to Mr. Ack-
ley's' comments before changing
the price of bars . .."
1.8 Per Cent Hike
But U.S. Steel said it decided to
raise bar prices 1.8 per cent, ef-
fective Sept. 7.
Ackley said the addition of steel
bars to products which have gone
up in price since November rules
out the possibility that the in-
creases were selective.
"They must be viewed as a con-
sistent pattern that has resulted
in higher prices for nearly half
the steel tonnage produced in this
country," he said in a statement.
First Federal Outcry
Ackley noted that since Novem-
I ber the industry has raised prices
on products accounting for half
of the nation's steel shipments.
It was the first public outcry
over steel price increases from the
administration since a price in-
crease last August was called In-
flationary. The industry held fast
then.
Bars account for 16 per cent of
total industry shipments andare.
used in such products as indus-

trial fasteners and railroad car
axles.
"After the long period of rela-
tive price stability in steel . .
these modest price changes can-
not be considered either unwar-
ranted or inflation inducing," said
U.S. Steel representatives.

CINEMAI
PRESENTS
PETER SELLERS
in
A SHOT.
IN THE DARK
('Scope and Color)
"Recent, popular!" The Daily
"Recent and popular !"-Cinema Guild
"Recent and popular !"-SGC
FRIDAY and SATURDAY

11

U

National News Roundup

By The Associated Press
LAS VEGAS, Nev. - Sm a11
amounts of radioactivity were re-
leased into the atmosphere yester-
day after a low-yield nuclear de-
vice was detonated by the Atomic
Energy Commission at its Nevada
test site, officials said.
An AEC spokesman said the
radiation from the tunnel shot
was detected 45 minutes to an
hour after the device was touched
off at 9:30 a.m.
He said none of the radiation
had left the government con-
trolled reservation, and at last re-

port it was still 16 to 18 miles
from the boundary.
* * *
CLEARWATER, Fla.-A dispute
that brought on resignations of
1,928 Pinellas County teachers
was settled yesterday with ap-
proval of a joint agreement calling
for the teachers to return to class-
es, with higher salaries, this morn-
ing.
Earlier yesterday the school
board had passed a resolution ask-
ing the Florida legislature to call
a special session on education, one
of the points demanded by the
teachers.

!T

7 and 9:15 P.M.

50c

MASS MEETING
THE MICHIGAN TECHNIC will hold a meeting for all those who are
interested in joining its staff on TUESDAY, SEPT. 5, 1967 at 7:30 P.M.
in ROOM 3077 E. Engineering.
The TECHNIC needs and will train staff members in all aspects of its
publication. The time demanded of students who join is minimal, the
rewards are great. Activities include publishing six monthly issues, at-
tending a national student convention, sponsoring a Hill Auditorium con-
cert, and attending staff parties, as well as the annual TECHNIC Banquet
after the last issue. In addition, the four top editors of the TECHNIC
receive $500 scholarships annually.
JOIN THE TECHNIC
THE NATION'S OLDEST ENGINEERING COLLEGE MAGAZINE
... .....{ ..\..0.h . . r..... .. ....v:y .7{:,.

GUILD HOUSE
802 MON ROE
FRIDAY, SEPT. 1-NOON LUNCHEON
Series:"THE JUST SOCIETY-
Domestic & International"
Prof. George Mendenhall,
Near East Studies:
"Redressing the Balance Before
Arab-Israeli Peace"
CONTROVERSIAL - INFORMATIVE - RELEVANT

1'

11

AUDITORIUM A, ANGELL HALL

NOW SHOWING
Mt!

THEY'RE GOING TO STEAL THE CROWN JEWELS?

Si

it,

I/iet

YOU MUST BE JOKING!

r.l+
+.lr'
s~«
".a
wr s
ssw
iM+
wrr+
wow.
iYY+
Y rYY
rY,«
;.l+
"..1
+w Y
+w1.
N«f!
M1+
ii«+
;sr"
.
+;r.
+rr
rYw!
.r.r
wrr.
Yr""
ii
- ei"r
rs"r
a..
wss.
pwr.

SABBATH SERVICE

OF WELCOME

MICHAEL CRAWFORD-OLIVER REED
HARRY ANDREWS
NECNICLOR"
*"JAMES DONALD
DANIEL MASSEY MICHAEL BOBDERlN ADHIELIA UCUDI lOTTE TARP

it

:: ,
\ .
}:
_ {"vY:
:?:j
i4 x i:
f:i r'n'v',
::4%:Cfr},
h+y4ib
:?*
v+ ti
' 'r :
1;i
:;: ' 'i>:
., ..
.
'i:
f Y
: : ti'r

N WMAN
REGISTRATION-WEEK PROGRAM
FRIDAY, SEPT. 1
B. Pomerey ...
The Vth POOR RICHARD'S FOLK FESTIVAL
Bob Franke " Peter Bowen * Jack Quine
Ed Reynolds 0 Newman Wyrd Assn.
Entertainment and Refreshments 8 P.M.
SATURDAY. SEPT. 2

Z, .

r
'I
1
f
I
i
li

Friday at 7:15 P.M.

FIRST IN A SERIES:
A HILLEL DIRECTOR
REACTS TO

Screp ia by DICK CLEMENT and IAN LA FRENAIS - From an inal stay by MICHAEL WINNER
Directed by MICHAELWINNER- Produced by MAURICE FOSTER and BEN ARBEID
A GILDOR-SCIMITAR PRODUCTION " A UNIVERSAL RELEASE
Thurs. 7, 9:05 P.M.
Fri., Sat., Sun. 7, 9:05, 11:10 P.M.
Mon.-Labor Day Only, 6, 8:05, 10:10 P.M.
Tues.-Thurs. 7, 9:05 P.M.
AIsO
Academy Award Nominee Short

ISRAEL AFTER

I'. Eu.

0 0 0

DR. HERMAN JACOBS will bring us a
weaIth of informntion anthered from

i

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan