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April 12, 1968 - Image 12

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fridoy, April 12, 196E

N,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, April 12, 196E

I

RVEY OF RIOT-TORN CITIES:
t dyasoroCzech R egim e C alls
tdyCalls Lo oter 'solid Citizen Cri"ici9 ''e-id

5

By Tile Associated Press
Who were the looters? Who
tossed the fire bombs .
In the aftermath of the assas-
sination of the Rev. Dr. Martin'
Luther King Jr., racial violence
struck more than 100 cities, whole
blocks went up in flames and
hundreds of stores were stripped
of everything that could be car-
ried out.
"The hoodlums did it," said a
Baltimore pharmacist whose drug
store in a. Negro neighborhood
was struck three times.
Poland P"a
G ain-olhs, N ew)
WARSAW P-Poland's Com-
munist party chief, Wladyslaw
Gomulka, anchored his power base
yesterday against the challenge of,
a group headed by. the nation's
secret police chief. Parliament ap-
proved two Gomulka supporters,
as the new ceremonial president
and minister of defense.
In a unanimous vote, the 460-
member Sejm, or Parliament,
elected Marshal Marian Spychal-
ski to the vacant pdst of presi-
dent. It also unanimously backed
the nomination of Lt. Gen. Woj-
ciech Jaruselski, 44, as defense
minister, the job Spychalski left.
Four other changes, three at
cabinet level, also were announced
in the continuing shake-up that
has followed the Gomulka regime's
bitter reaction to last month's
antigovernment student riots.
Premier J o s e f Cyrankiewicz
promised more "systematic purges
of bureaucrats, troublemakers, in-
competents and those who were
alien to us." The "alien" refer-
ence was taken by Westerners
here to mean Jws, a main target
for the government's attacks.
Gomulka's opponents are an ul-
tranationalist group of Communist
World War II resistance fighters
known as the Partisans. Under the

That seems to be a general as-
sumption-but arrest records in a
sampling of cities often run
counter to this belief.-
In Washington, interviews by
the District of Columbia Bail
Agency disclosed that a number
of the arrested could be called
solid citizens of the community.
The city-run agency interviewed
1,200 persons 18 and over by
Tuesday afternoon.
"A larger percentage of them
are working," said an interviewer.
"A lot of them have jobs-good
rty Chief
Sp port'.
leadership of Maj. Gen. Mierczy-
slaw Moczar, interior minister and
secret police chief, they have been
maneuvering for.-power, and had
pushed one of their members, Lt.
Gen. Grzegorz Korcynski for the
defense minister's job.
The group mixes attacks on
"Zionists" with opposition to
party officials who came into
power during the Stalin era.
Spychalski, whose wife is Jew-
ish, was jailed during the early
1950s when he fell into disgrace
with the Polish Stalinists.
Most observers gauged the ap-
pointments of Spychalski and
Jaruselski as good indicators of
how Gomulka has fared against
.the Partisans.

jobs, some of them appropriate for
their education level."
What did this indicate to him?
"I guess it means a lot of people
who normally don't commit crimes
were out there in those stores
grabbing stuff along with the
rest."
Sam Devine, owner of a shoe
store in Chicago, was surprised
Monday when a 16-year-old Negro
walked into his store, returned a
pair of shoes and apologized for
taking them. "His folks must have
told him to return them," Devine
said. "It was really something
nice."
But in Memphis, where it all
started a week ago, police said the
typical rioter was 24, most likely
unemployed and with a one-in
four chance of having a police
record.
Ofd103 persons arrested in
Memphis for looting, 3P were over
17 years and 30 were women,
Three were 6-year-olds, who were
released.
The average rioter in Youngs-
town, Ohio, was said by police to
be between 19 and 21, unem-
ployed, and often had a police or
juvenile record. Most are school
dropouts from low-income fami-
lies.
In Cincinnati, the city prosecu-
tor's office described most of those
arrested as "youngsters out to
raise a little hell."
The Washington Post analyzed
data on 119 persons processed by
the District of Columbia Bail
Agency-which does not handle
juveniles-and found that 49 had

not gone beyond the 10th grade.
Only 13 were unemployed. Of
those employed, 14 were construc-
tion workers, 10 were janitors, 11
worked for the federal govern-
ment and 5 for-the Post Office
Department.
Baltimore Mayor Thomas J.
D'Alesandro III, estimated /that
only about 3,000 persons of the
city's 910,000 population was ac-
tively involved in the disturbance
there.
Among five persons arrested on
Chicago's West Side Tuesday and
charged with arson were Edward
"Fats" Crawford, 46, president of
the National 'Negro Rifle Associa-
tion, a group with the announced
purpose of teaching self defense to
Negroes, and Frederick Andrews,
29, an organizer of the Garfield
Organization, a Negro self-help
group.
But everywhere, young people,
teen-agers, even children, partici-
pated in the disturbances in large
numbers.

t 1

PRAGUE (P) -- Czechoslovakia's Czechoslovakia's new freedom of
Communist regime, apparently the press was getting out of hand
slowing its liberalization drive, and might endanger his economic
told news media yesterday that and political reform program.
free-wheeling criticism of party In an another development, In-
apparatchiks, or bureaucrats, was terior Minister Josef Pavel said
getting one-sided and demagogic. he had begun moving toward
Party chief Alexander Dubeck separating the secret police fron
charged newsmen with "one-sided- the normal public safety services
ness in the press campaign." He -a recommendation in Dubcek's
said it had become "necessary to action program. Pavel said he was
defend functionaries of the party." trying to remove "people who vio-
these functionaries, he said in lated the law."
the party newspaper Rude Pravo, Ministry Violators
are now being demagogically ac-
cused by some individuals." He told the news agency CTK
h nnld nt P--imn tho im

I.t
l'
i

Mut ctWiel .Fie coua noc es ima~e te num-
Must Act 'Wisely ' .J~UA1~ ~~~.~1I~.~~
Dubcek, considered a middle- ber of law violators who still held
of-the-road leader reluctant to ministry posts. He oversees the
further antagonize hard liners secret police.
still holding posts on the party Dubcek said decisions should be
Central Committee, emphasized based on agreement among all
that it is now necessary to act parties including non-Commun-
"wisely with due consideration ists, but once such decisions were
and without hysteria." reached "they must be obligatory
To some, Dubcek's warning may and the minority must give way
have reflected his opinion that to the majority."

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