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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 12, 1968 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 96 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

p

Pigers Edge Red Sox, 4-3

DETROIT - 'Gates Brown's
pinch-hit homer in the ninth, in-
ning gave the Detroit Tigers a
4-3 victory over the Boston Red
Sox yesterday in a batfle ofnhome
runs.
Detroit had taken a 3-0 lead in
the first two inn igs, tagging Bos-
ton starter Jose Santiago for four
hits. Dick McAuliffe led off the
first inning with his first home
run of the season.
Don Wert doubled and rode
home on Al Kaline's single before
Santiago retired the side.
Bill Freehan started the second
Iwith a home run and then San-
tiago settled down until the sev-
enth when he was taken out after'
walking two men with one out.
Al Lyle came on and walked Mc-
Auliffe to load the bases, but Lee
Stange got'the Red Sox out of the
jam by getting Wert on a pop fly
and Kaline on a long fly to rookie
Joe Lahoud in right field.
NATIONAL LEAGUE'

*

*

*

'M' Nine Wmin Doubleheader,

Set Back Detroit

7-5,

3-0

I knew right then it was all over. There was no way I
could get away,
Everybody stepped back from the bar, leaving me alone.
Even the bartender, a nice guy who had let me have a few
too many, moved down to the other end of the bar with the
big guy.
SOMEBODY CALLED the syndicate man. It took only a
few minutes.
He was good-lookling and friendly. I knew better than to
resist. He knew more karate than the Colt 45 stunt man.
And he had a gun. Only the syndicate men could have
guns, of course.
I was sentenced the next day. There were no recourses.
No paroles. No pardons. I would have to die.
The judge, who looked like he really stood for justice and
decency and good will, tried to explain why it had to be this way.
I'D HEARD IT all before, of course, in school. But I
listened patiently.
Things had been really bad back then. I mean, they were
on the brink of a vomiting, gutrgoring, sinew-stretching, omni-
hell disaster. ,
Kids, teenage boys who had iever felt the power of their
manhood, threw bricks and burnt buildings. Their older brothers
killed: rampagingly and recklessly, discriminately picking out
policemen and National Guardsmen.
Law was a real joke. It was like they didn't give a damn
that cops stood for peace. They wanted war.
Men killing men. Senseless. Brutal. Sinful.
FINALLY ALL the decent people held a meeting. They de-
cided to end all the blood-letting once and for all.
They banded together, concentrating their electoral strength
in precincts, wards and districts, ands elected legislators who
kept their promises.
Congress passed the billunanimously because the minority
militants were afraid to go on record against peace. The bill,
which became The Law because it pre-empted all other laws,
said that any man who perpetrated yiolence . against another
would be executed.
AT FIRST IT was difficult to enforce. But Congress passed
a 90 per cent surtax to build a special militia-the syndicate-
which handled the details.
Some people found it a little uncompromising. Fraternity,
alumni were dismayed when all fraternity "hell week" chair-
men were executed.
VFW clubs found it hard to accept. Men who had gotten
used to knocking their wives around didn't like it.
ON THE OTHER HAND, there were humanitarian groups
who lobbied Congress to' amend the bill so that it would also in-
clude anyone who perpetrated violence against dumb animals.
After debating the proposal, Congress rejected it on the
premise even Americans could get too much of a good thing.
But the original law, which had 'been nicknamed the
"Love Your Neighbor or Die Trying" law, stood firm on the
strong arm of the syndicate.

By PAT ATKINS their come-from-behind rally with
Michigan's baseball team upped a walk to second baseman Bud
its season record to 3-11 yesterday Forsythe. Rightfielder Elliott Mad-
afternoon against the University dox also walked and Redmon de-
of Detroit by sweeping a double- livered a key hit over second to
header. tie the score, 5-5. Another -single
The first of the two games was by Hosler drove in both runners
a slugfest with the Wolverines for the victory,
coming from one run behind and Making his first appearance in
scoring three runs in the sixth Ferry Field, sophomore Steve
to clinch a 7-5 win. Evans struck out seven in the sec-
In the second contest, pitching ond game on the way to his first
dominated the game with Steve win
Evans going all the way for Mich- With one out in the opening
igan to notch a four-hit victory, frame, Maddox sent a curving shot
3-0 down the rightfield line for a

St. Louis
Houston
Philadelphia
Cincinnati
San Francisco
Chicago
Atlanta
Pittsburgh
xNew York
xLos Angeles
x--Late games n

2
W
z
II
1
1
0
0

I
0
1
1
1
1

Pct hind
1.000 -
1.000 ,-
.500 '
.500 14
.500 14
.500 ,1.
.500 '
.000 I
.000 1

STEVE EVANS
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Mihnesota
New York
Baltimore
Boston
ClevdIand-
Detroit
California
Chicago'
Oakland.
"Washington

w
2
l
1
1
1
1
0
0

L
0
0
0
1
1
1
I
1
2

Pet
1.000
1.000
1.000
.500
.500
.500
.500
.000
.000
.000

GB
1
1
1
1

ot included

The first game began inauspici-
ously for 'Michigan with the first
two batters striking out, but third
baseman Glen Redmon ended the
pitcher Larry Salci's strike-out
streak with a line drive through
shortstop.
A double by first baseman Jim
Hosler, a single by starting pitcher
Jack Hurley, a balk, and an error
by third baseman Terry Burney
resulted in three runs.
In the bottom. of the first, the
Trojans tallied for two runs. Hur-.
ley held them scoreless until the
fifth when he was chased from the
mound on an error, two walks,
and two singles, adding three more
runs. Reliefer Rod Scott, who got
the eventual victory, retired the
side.
The next inning Michigan beganI

NEW YORK W)-Wilt Cham-
berlain of the Philadelphia
76ers was the only unanimous
choice to the NBA All-Star
team announced yesterday by
Commissioner Walter Kennedy.
Chamberlain received a per-
feet score of 12.0 and is joined
on the first squad by Elgin
Baylor of Los Angeles, Oscar
Robertson and Jerry Lucas of
Cincinnati and Dave Bing of
Detroit.

Thursday's Results
Pittsburgh 3, San Francisco 1, 15
In nings.
Chicago 10, Cincinnati 3
Houston 7, Philadelphia 3
New York at Los Angeles, ight
St. Louis 10, Atlanta 3

Yesterday's Results
Detroit 4, Boston 3
Minnesota 5, Washington
California 7, Cleveland 5

double. On an outside pitch
broke for third and when catc
Herb Eschback's throw went o
Burney's head, Maddox came
with the winning run.

NHL STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS

East Division
Semifinals"
Montreal 3, Boston 2, Montreal
wins best-of-7 series 4-0
ahicago 7 New York 4, New York
leads best-of-7 series 2-1.'

West Division
Seinfinds
St. Louis 5, Philadelphia 2, St.
Louis leaos' best-of-7 series, 3-1.
Minnesota 3, Los Angeles 2, best-
\of-~7 series tied 2-2.

Do WeHavePants?!

Plaids:
Checks:
Tatteralls:
Note: New Shipment
just arrived: white,
gray, red, plus 7 other

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$ Bing Vs Your Books $
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.. . ..

_ T

SOCIAL WORK STUDENTS
PROTEST, VIET' NAM WAR,

The most famous- case involved a Dr. Spock
ping the rear of a new-born baby. There was
sentiment that he should have been pardoned.
BUT, OF COURSE, the law was The Law.

caught slap-
some public

i

he
her
ver
in

1-

4.

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State6 Street on the Campus

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We; the undersigned social work students and faculty at the University f
Michigan, believe that our country's involvement in the Viet Nam war is im
moral and unjust. We feel that the principles of our profession and our con-
cern for humanity are being compromised by the actions of our government-
Because of this belief, and our belief in the democracy of the United States,
we feel obligated to protest; and to advocate withdrawal of U.S. forces from
Viet Nam.

J

SHIRTMAK.ERS,

t 5.5
1, .
:' ,'
/

Mitchell J Lazarus
Christ-ine Keller
David J. MadCoy
Kathy StcihlI
Jerry Willing
Hans W. Anderson,
Eu ene L. Hoorpman
Ira Frankel
Carol.Hoffer
Fred Ferris
Laurence Kressel
Mary Novick
Judith Duboff
Joann Lewit
Hilary Green,
Mike Lura
Thomas Manderville
J. Lawrence Gunibs
David J. Delman
Willis K. Bright
David E. Krehbiel
James S. Richardson
JohnEhrlich
John Ford
Michael D. Praetzel
Lya Celmins
Bob MacDonald
Gail A. Green,
Larry Green
Fran Levitt
Valerie Fontaine
Sandra Jablonski
John Kenel
Sumner McClain

Hedda Matza
Robert Lassiter
Charles Garvin
Rita Jones
Bonnie Wheaton
Judith Braver
Timothy Germany
Bob Melton
Elizabeth Hawley
Suzanne E. Demorg
Michael Ehrlich
Emily Ford
Gary Nederveld
Dale Lanengo
Bob McClellen
Bert Jay DeLeeow
Sue Palmer
Darry Metion
Ron Hemmulgarn
Tino Katz
Dr. Jack Rothman
Jay Wilson Boliman
Susan Ehrlick
Wendy Patricia Roe
Wayne Ernest Hanson
Ellen B. Eichler
Robert T. Hovey
David Dillman
Revelle Pergament
Gatha C. Hesselden
David P. Kramer
Lyn Woods
Joel Verbin
Ronald Archambault

Andrew Odin
Walter Paul
John Davis
William D. Stark
Sue Ginsburg
Patricia Brininger
Virginia Rock
Donald Quigley
Peter C. Loeb
Barry Giller
Martha Irwin
Daniel M. Paunington
Rev. Paul F. Fettig
Thomas J. Vaccaro
Tai K. Shin
Richard Marx
James D. Russell
Marcia Mindell
Diane Halvorsen
Mary Delano
Nan Sara Toder
Helen Cooper
Gertrude Warkentin
Jan Sperling
Corene Mierau
Susan Fromstein
Ann Huillrut
Pamela Blair
Annette Johnson
Maureen Mates
Guy Pucce
Lonnie Keys
Nancy Archibald
Justine Taylor

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