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January 14, 1968 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-14

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PAGE-TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JA ARYw14~ 1968

PAQKTWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. JANTJAILY 14.. 1961

wrv asap vka". vas-... ~ +. +v vv',

TECHNOLOGICAL ASSISTANCE':
Industrial Sciences Group Providing
University Research for State Industry

Howe To Lecture Tomorrow in
Writer-in-Residence Program

(Continued from Page 1)
of five more days would have be-
gun an avalanche of new-order
losses totalling millions of dollars
per day.
ISO's program also includes
"problem diagnosis and resource
location." This usually involves re-
ferring a company with some un-
solved problem to a commercial
firm equipped to meet the com-
pany's needs. If no commercial
firm can perform the needed serv-
ice, ISG coordinates the applica-
tion of University resources to
solve the difficulty.
This problem diagnosis may in-'
dicate the need for a large-scale
project like the one which develop-
ed when Ford General Parts came
to ISO for help in setting up a
continuing education program.
The affiliation with Ford General
Parts has grown to include a
$40,000 guidance contract plus
$10,000 for consultants and a
$33,000 optimum decision-making
accuracy research project.
The decision-making project is
an example of ISO's attempt to
benefit the academic program of
the Engineering School. Impetus
for the project came from a uni-
versity graduate student in search
of a practical problem for his
thesis on optimum decision-mak-
ing accuracy.
Rozian explained that ISG is
"to be supported by state funds
for the first two years, but to sup-
port itself on the income of its
agents afterwards." In dealing
with ISG, a firm generally agrees
to one of two fee options, a 60
per cent or a 75 per cent overhead
on salaries.
If the company agrees to a 60
per cent overhead, the University
retains the rights to all patentable

innovations, while 75 per cent
overhead leaves patent rights to
the company. In a similar situ-
ation several years ago, the Uni-
versity of Wisconscin experienced
an incredible windfall by gaining
patent rights to fluoridated tooth-
paste.
Rozian also said that part of the
purpose of ISO is to "shake the
tree of NASA and defense re-
search,' and in this capacity ISG
receives requests for aid under the
The Week

State Technical Services Act in
addition to referrals from the
University Ofice of Research Ad-
ministration, the Industrial De-
velopment Department of the In-
stitute of Science and Technology,
and the department chairman's
and dean's offices. The act pro-
vides federal funds to match state
and private funds to make ad-
vanced technology of colleges and
federal agencies available to pri-
vate businesses.

To Come:

A Campus Calendar

Irving Howe will initiate this
year's writer - in - residence pro-
gram tomorrow evening with a
lecture on "The Idea of the
Modern" at 8 p.m. in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
A reception following the lec-
ture will be held in the Ballroom
Terrace of the Union.
The purpose of this program is
"to extend the world of the
writer to the University student,"
says Mary Benjamin, '68, general
chairman of the writer-in-resi-.
dence central planning committee.
Known as a severe critic of
American society since the De-
pression days of the 1930's, Howe
refers to himself as a "Democratic
Socialist."
A belief in democratic ideals
combined with scathing criticism
of the present state of society is
embodied in his books "Steady
Work; Essays in the Politics of
Democratic Radicalism 1953-19-
66." "Politics and the Novel," and
"The UAW and Walter Reuther."
Howe participated with the
planning committee in the draw-
ing up of his agenda. The pro-
gram was designed to allow stu-
dents to meet, talk with, and get
to know him in many varied
roles. Among the various events
on Howe's program are large lec-
tures, discussions, and formal and
informal symposiums.
Howe will be living in the Resi-
dential College, in East.y Quad,
where he will hold office hours
from 10 a.m. until noon on Jan.
16, 18 and 23.
Howes two-week program in-
cludes:
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 17

4:10 p.m.-A lecture will be pre-
sented on "Anarchy and Author-
ity in American Literature" in
Aud. A.
FRIDAY, JAN. 19
8:00 p.m. - A symposium on'
"Radical Resistance: Success orI
Suicide?" will be held in Lydia I
Mendelssohn Theatre. Prof. Tom
Mayer of the sociology depart-
ment, Barry Bluestone, Grad, and
John Bishop, Grad, will speak.
TUESDAY, JAN. 23
4:10 p.m. - A symposium on
"T h e American Revolutionary

I

Tradition" will be presented with
Prof. Robert Sklar 4of the history
department and Gordon Wood,
Grad.
FRIDAY, JAN. 26
8:00 p.m.-A lecture on "Wil-
Liam Faulkner: A Reconsidera-
tion" will be held in the Union
Ballroom. Prof. Marvin Felheim
of the English department will
give an introduction.
SUNDAY, JAN. 28
2:30 p.m.-The final lecture on
"The World of the Writer" will
be given in Rackham.

MONDAY
TUESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
7:00-9:00

30 20 WASTENAW Dial 434-1782

WEDNESDAY
SATU R DAY
SUNDAY
1-3-5-7-9

4

MIRIAN MAKEBA will be featured in the first event of the
Greatest Arts Festival of 1968, a concert at Hill Auditorium on
January 27. Miss Makeba is an internationally known African
folksinger.
Art Festival Opens
To Miriam Makeba

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 12
7 and 9 p.m. -- Cinema Guild
will show "Experimental Film Pro-
gram No. 1" in the Architecture
Aud.
8:30 p.m. - The University
Musical Society will present the
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra of
London, Vaclav Neumann con-
ducting, in Hill Aud.
THURSDAY, JAN. 18
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
will present Lloyd Bacon's "Broth-
er Orchid" in the Architecture
Aud.
FRIDAY, JAN. 19
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will present Lloyd Bacon's "Broth-,
er Orchid" in the Architecture
Aud.
8 p.m.-Hockey: Michigan vs.
Western Ontario University at the
Coliseum.
8 p.m. - Swimming: Michigan
vs. Michigan State University at
the Matt Mann Pool.
SATURDAY, JAN. 20
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild

will present Michelangelo Anton-
ioni's "La Notte" in the Architec-
ture Aud.
8 p.m.-Wrestling: Michigan vs.
University of Iowa at the Events
Building.
8:30 p.m. - The University
Musical Society will present the
Chicago Little Symphony, Thor
Johnson conducting, in Rackham
Aud.
SUNDAY, JAN. 21
7 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema Guild
will present Michelangelo Anton-
ioni's "La Notte" in the Architec-
ture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present the University Cham-
ber Choir, Maynard Klein con-
ducting, with Charles Fisher and,
Reid Nibley, pianists, in Hill Aud.

Mona Lisa doesn't usually ap-
pear as a cut out to be folded and
the :Creative Arts Festival doesn't
usually present The Realist's Paul
Krassner and .artist Robert Rau-
schenberg.
But the 1968 version of the
Festival has a new focus with an
emphasis on "new conceptions of
art forms" and new artists who
aren't frequent visitors in Ann
Arbor._
The -Mona symbol, created by
John Eding and Buster Simpson,
graduate - students in the art
school, captures this new direction
and opens the way to such Fes-
tival participants as novelist John
Barth' and film-maker Stan Van-
derbeek,
The festival opens Jan. 27 with
a concert featuring South African
folksinger Miriam Makeba. The
event, will be held at Hill Aud-
itorium and will provide financial
support for all other Festival
events.
Miss Makeba has a repertoire
which ranges from African songs
In Zulu, Swazi, and Xosa to melo-
dies sung in Spanish, Hebrew and
Portuguese. The unique singer has
only one suggestion that might
help in categorizing her. "When
people ask me what I sing like,"
she says, "the best I can do is
tell them, 'Come and hear me!"
Completely self-taught, unable
even now. to read music, Miss
Makeba had no formal or aca-
demic vocal training -to start her
on the career that soon gained her
international fame. "I never took
lessons, I just sing," she says.

Beginning with amateur activ-
ities and benefits, the now cele-
brated Xosa tribeswoman man-
aged to sing her way out of the
privations and anonymity of
South Africa Negro life. Chanting,
trilling, crooning, even belting the
songs that grew out of folklore,
she barnstormed as a soloist with
small groups, traveling from town
to village, from city slum juke-
joint to rural makeshift recreation
hall.
Then a troupe called the Black
Manhattan Brothers heard her
and invited her to join their
group. With them she toured
throughout South Africa, Rhodes-
ia and the Congo.
A few years later Miss Makeba
came to the attention of film-
maker Lionel Rogosin who fea-
tured her in his highly contro-
versial, semi-documentary film,
"Come Back, Africa." The film
caught Steve Allen's notice and
he featured her on his television
show in November, 1959. A pro-
fessional association with Harry
Belafonte followed. Today, Miss
Makeba is regarded throughout
the world as one of the most revo-
lutionary talents now on the
scene.
Later events in the Festival in-
clude lectures by columnist Art
Buchwald and novelist Claude
Brown. There will also be aC TP-
sponsored presentation of "The
Fantastiks."
Student - faculty participation
will be emphasized by such events
as the Packard Ave. Playreaders'
"Salome," and the Inter-Michi-
gan Art Show.

SCAMPUSI

DIAL
8-6416

/

NO 2-6264
oils

ENDS WEDNESDAY

The Year's Great Suspense Story !
"Keeps You Glued To Your Seat !"
MICHIGAN DAILY
McllmD CREIM

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LOADED WITH LAUGHS!
"WAC FUR at h Vth Forum
Gives Vittorio Gassman a chance
to explode. It is as though
Peter Sellers or Alec Guinness
were turned loose in an
Italian film. It is wild.. it is fun!"
-Bosley Crowther, N. Y. Times
" Love and Larceny' does for larceny
what 'Divorce Italian Style'
so gaily did for divorce.!
-Peter Bunzel, Life Magazine
"Like all satisfying comedies,
.;:>< sEAA " ssNthis one is loaded not only
with a inhs but with satire

n.

'MONDAY! HEAR HOWE!
opening lecture:
"THE IDEA OF THE MODERN"
RACKHAM-8:00 P.M.
R eception following lecture:
Ballroom Terrace of the Union
I(

4
+

I

and irony. I recommend a visit
to The Coronet. Gassman -is
a master of impersonation!" I
-Judith Cris?, Herald Tribune

"An
ingenious
and
thoroughly
captivating
romp!"
-olsAlperte
Sot. Review

' """" " "'Love and Larceny'
is loaded with guffaws.
I'm still laughing!"
--Jim O'Connor, Journal American
IJ1hER JACKET" 6 SSIMIK
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