100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 04, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

Thursday, April 4, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thursday, April 4, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

U

Track
WASHINGTON (P) - The na-
tion's colleges, threatening to car-
ry their track war to the courts,
asked yesterday for a Justice De-
, partment antitrust investigation
of the Amateur Athletic Union
(AAU) after turning down a Sen-
ate-backed proposal for peace.
Both the U.S. Track and F'ield
Federation (USTFF) and its af-
filiate, the National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA),
pledged, however, they would try
to keep their bitter battle with the
AAU for control of amateur ath-
letics from imperiling the make-
up of America's Olympic team.
Three senators suggested that a
settlement be written into law to
end the long feud before the Oc-
4 tober games in Mexico City.
Prof. Marcus L. Plant of the
law school, president of the NCAA,
all but conceded the dispute would
have to be resolved in either the
courts or Congress and said he
had little hope for a voluntary
Sagreement with the AAU.
The USTFF president, the Rev.
Wilfred H. Crowley, disclosed he
has written Atty. Gen. Ramsey
Clark to ask for an antitrust in-
vestigatiori of the AAU and vowed,
"If we cannot get satisfaction
there we will go to court."
Asked how long he was willing
to wait, Father Crowley said, "Oh,
I guess he (Clark) is a busy man
-maybe a week or so.
USTFF attorney Philip Brown
said, however, he didn't expect
Tigers' Lolich
Defeats Astros
COCOA, Fla (R)-Mitckey Stan-
ley's three-run homer in the third
yesterday brought Detroit a 3-1
* exhibition victory over Houston.
Mickey Lolich and Dennis Ribant
combined to five-hit the Astros.
Ribant. was trying to put the
finishing touches on a shutout
when he served up a home run
ball to Jim Wynn to open the
ninth.
1 He retired the next three men
to wrap up the game.
The difference was Stanley's
380-foot blow off Larry Dierker. It
folowed singles by Ray Oyler and
Tom Matchick.

Feud

MARCUS PLANT
court action to come that quickly.
Brown said he would seek to set up
a meeting with the Justice Depart-
ment. 1
Spokesmen for the attorney gen-
eral said Father Crowley's letter
hadn't been received and declined
comment.
In Maumee, Ohio, where he is
attending the AAU boxing cham-
pionships, Col. Donald Hull, exe-
cutive director of the AAU, termed
the anti-trust threat "ridiculous."
He said, "I don't know much
about the anti-trust act. I'm just
a sportsman. I thought the anti-
trust act was just for business-
men. I don't see how it deals with
a non-profit group trying to help
the young athletes of America.
"There is no monopoly in this
country in the sports game. The
AAU is open to everyone. I sure
wish Mr. Clark would tell them to
go ahead and spend their money.
If they'd spend it on sports, we'd
all be better off."
TPe settlement recommended!
by an arbitration panel set up, by
the Senate and appointed by Vice
President Hubert H. Humphrey
gave the lion's share of the com-
promise to the AAU. It would
have allowed the NCAA to con-!
tinue student meets, but required
the USTFF to meet AAU require-
ments in itscompetition.
The AAU accepted the settle-
ment in February, but Father
Crowley rejected the proposal,
arguing that it would continue
what he called an AAU monopoly
over amateur athletics.
Sen. Warren G. Magnuson, (D-'
Wash), chairman of the Senate
Commerce Committee, said his
group would act quickly to start
writing an enforced settlement
into' law.
"We'll take the board's recom-
mendation and build around it a
piece of legislation," Magnuson
said.
Two other bills -already are
,pending and Plant indicated the
NCAA could live with either one
of them, but not with the Mag-
nuson proposal.
One measure, by Sen. James B.
Pearson (R-Kan.), would set up a
new super group to oversee ama-
teur athletics. Father Crowley said
this parallels the USTFF goal, al-
though he wants minor changes in
the Pearson bill.
The other proposal, by Sen.
Robert P. Griffin (R-Mich.), for-
bids stripping anyx athlete of eli-
gibility for competing in a rival

EXHIBITION BASEBALL
National League

Move
organization's meet. It would em-
power an athlete to go to court for
an injunction if necessary.
Sen. Griffin said: "It is unfor-
tunate that this senseless war is
continuing. It is time for Con-
gress to move rapidly to make
sure that the individual athlete
will no longer be caught in the
middle."
Sen. Pearson added, "We can no1
longer jeopardize amateur athlet-
ics in the United States because!
of a power struggle between heads
of competing organizations."
Plant called the Griffin propos-
al acceptable and said the NCAA
would fight vigorously against1
any effort by Magnuson to con-
vert the arbitration recommenda-1
tions to law.
Father Crowley said Magnuson1
"has reacted in anger and made
some ill-informed remarks - not1
for, the first time."
The Los Altos, Calif., priest
blamed the Senate Commerce
Comimittee for the continuing'
war, saying it had failed to con-
sult the USTFF in setting up the
arbitration panel in 1965.
In New York, labor mediator
Theodore Kheel, who headed the
board, said he was "surprised, if
not shocked," by the rejection.
Hull added, "If the NCAA
doesn't implement the board's
ruling, I don't see how they can'
keep athletes from losing their
leigibility for national competi-
tion and even the Olympic
Games."
Father Crowley said the USTFF
would continue sponsoring meets,
but said he didn't anticipate par-
ticipation by any outside athletes
whose presence mightscause the
AAU to renew threats to take
away the eligibility of others com-
peting.
Plant said, "I don't think there
is any event, coming up between
now and Nov. 1 that would bring
this into issue."
When the moratorium expires,
however, on that date three days
after the Olympic Games, Father
Crowley said the USTFF would
resume sanctions on meets. He
threatened to keep college ath-
letes out of AAU competition if
no settlement has been reached.
"If they don't follow our rules,
they aren't going to have our:
athletes," he said.
He said the USTFF, with the
NCAA as its largest member, in-
cludes 90 per cent of the nation's
amateur athletes. He argued that,
the AAU had no right to monop!
oly over the meets in which they
compete.
In his letter to Clark, Father
Crowley asked him "to investigate!
violations of the Sherman Anti-
trust Laws on the part o f the
Amateur Athletic Unionby mon-
opolistic rules and practices un-
duly restricting track and field
competition in the United States."
Brown said AAU denial of eligi-
biilty to five Iowa high school
girls who had competed in a
USTFF meet could be made a
test case in the courts.
The USTFF already has voted
to reject the arbitration panel's
findings and the NCAA Council
will meet in Denver, Colo., later
this month. Plant said he would
recommend formal rejection and
gave every indication he expects
his recommendation to be fol-
lowed.

!i
I *1'
ing
rising r
arkets.
basis
rience.
ilesmen
ISSMAN,
U

*

*

*

*

*

NBA Holds

Eardy

Draft.

Toward

NEW YORK (P) - With All-
American Elvin Hayes safely
tucked away, the National Bas-
ketball Association announced its
first-round draft picks yesterday
and determinedly set out to beat
the American Basketball Associa-
tion to Westley Unseld and a host
of lesser-known players.
The San Diego Rockets, who
had first choice in the draft, se-
lected Hayes last week and signed
him, reportedly to a four-year
contract worth $440,000. The
player of the year from the Uni-
versity of Houston also was sought
by the Houston Mavericks of the

their picks Monday on a telephone
hookup and the league disclosed
the selections yesterday,
The Baltimore Bullets, who lost
a coin flip to San Diego for the
No. 1 pick, chose Unseld, two-time
All-American from Louisville.
"'We're going to leave no stone
unturned to sign Unseld to an
NBA contract," General Manager
Buddy Jeannette said. "Our own-
ers have pledged themselves to
bring Unseld to Baltimore in a
Bullets' uniform."
Meanwhile, the Kentucky Col-
onels of the ABA offered the 6-'

ABA.' foot-8 star a four-year
The other NBA teams made! worth $500,000.
SPORTS BULLETS.

contract1

Courts

Fleming Turns, Pro,
* NEW YORK-Glamourous Peggy Fleming parlayed her
Olympic gold medal into a gold mine yesterday, signing a pro
contract that should make her a millionairess in the next five
years.
"Her potential is unlimited-she can become another Sonja
Henie," said Bob Banner, West Coast television producer who
joined with the National Broadcasting Co. in tying up the
world's figure skating queen to what they called a long-term
agreement.
** *
0 BOSTON-Tony Conigliaro of the Red Sox suffered minor
injuries early today in a two-car collision only hours after re-
turning to Boston from spring training to undergo eye tests.
The accident occurred in the nearby suburb of Somerville
and the young outfielder was taken to the city hospital for treat-
ment of bruises. He was released a short time later, a hospital
spokesman said.
* * *
!0 DETROIT-Joe Louis, former world heavyweight boxing
champion, said Tuesday that the elimination tournament to
determine a successor to dethroned champion Cassius Clay "is
ridiculous."
"As far as I'm concerned, Clay is still champion, at least
until he goes to jail or retires," he said. "I think he made an
awful mistake by not going into the Army. He threw away a
brilliant career."
* * *
*0MILWAUKEE, Wis.-Larry Costello, a wily veteran of 11
professional seasons, was named head coach of the new Mil-
waukee entry in the National Basketball Association Wednesday.
John Erickson, coach at the University of Wisconsin for
the past nine was named general manager.
The Milwaukee entry-still unnamed-will begin play next
fall.
Costello, forced to step down as a player with Philadelphia
because of a torn achilles tendon, said he will remain with the
76ers as an assistant coach through the NBA playoffs.
He said there was a possibility he would be a player-coach
with Milwaukee.

Just what kind of contracts
might be offered other No. 1
choices was not known, but most
of the other first-round players
lack the glamor that has built up
around the names of Hayes and
Unseld.
Seattle was third in the draft
and selected 6-8 Bob Kauffman
of Guilford. Chicago followed with
7-foot Tom Boerwinkle of Ten-
nessee, Cincinnati with 6-8 Donj
Smith of Iowa State and Detroit
with 6-11 Otto Moore of Pan
American.
The two new teams selected
next. Milwaukee took 6-8 Charles
Paulk of Northeastern Oklahoma
and Phoenix grabbed 6-7 Gary
!Gregor of South Carolina.
San Francisco selected 6-3 Ron
Williams of West Virginia; New
York, 6-8 Bill Hosket of Ohio
State; Los Angeles, 6-6 Bill Hew-
itt of Southern California; Bos-
ton, 6-5 Don Chaney of Houston;
St. Louis, 6-1 Skip Harlicka of
South Carolina, and Philadelohia,
6-5 Shaler Halimon of Utah State.
The Lakers immediately an-
nounced they had signed Hewitt!
to a three-year contract but
would not divulge terms. Hewitt
said he had been quite close to
signing with Denver of the ABA.
There also was a report Tuesday
that Kauffman, a Little All-
American, already was signed by
Seattle.
In Minneapolis, meanwhile,
ABA commissioner George Mikan
said the NBA's telephonic draft
was more or less a declaration of
war.
"This puts us in a terrible spot."
Mikan said. "I guess we have to,
enter into the unholy war cif go-
ing after these ballplayers. What
about their pledge to allow these
ballplayers to play in the Olym-
pics?
"They're going out and signing:
all these fellows. Now we'll have
to go ahead and try to sign them."

Auni Jmima sIZTIE
Junction U.S. 23 & 12
SUMMER JSOBS
Vacation replacement jobs are currently
available at the Inland Steel Company,
Indiana Harbor Works, in East Chicago,
Indiana. Positions available as production
workers, lab technicians, electrical and me-
chanical maintenance men and student en-
gineers based upon your college major and
year of school.
For application please write:
Employment Supervisor
Inland Steel Company
3210 Watling Street
East Chicago, Indiana 46312
WE ARE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

with FOUR SECRET RECIPE SAUCES
dip the chicken in:
Pricilla sauce, Barbeque,
Italian-Romano,
& Frichassee sauce

Old Bomb.

Downtown
HONDA
Sales stal
Sales & Service, Inc. Service stA "-
310 EAST 665-8637 Parts $tkAe.
WASHINGTON Accesssries-Min st.
Dip 'n Chicken
Country Fried Chicken

Cincinnati
St. Louis
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Atanta
Los Angeles
Chicago
Philadelphia
Houston
New York

W
15
16
14
14
13
12
12
13
11
6

L
8
9
11
11
11
12
12
13
12
18
6
11
11
14
13
12
11
15
14
17

Pct.
.652
.640
.560
.560
.542
.500
.500
.500
.478
.250
739
.542
.522
.481
.480
.478
.476
.400
.391
.391

American League
Washington ' 17
Oakland 13
California 12
D~etroit 13
Chicago 12
Baltimore 11
New York 10
Cleveland 10
Minnesota 9
B~oston 8

Yesterday's Games
Detroit 3, Houston 1
Washington 3, Baltimore 2
Atlanta 7, New York (A) 1
Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 3
Oakland 9, Boston 2
Cleveland 10, Los Angeles 8
Chicago (N) 7, San Francisco
11 innings.
California G, Seattle, PCL, 1
Philadelphia 5, St. Louis 4

N ew Honda.

6'

w

WE NEED YOUR
SELLING ABILITY

I

If you have any selling or
business experience, then you
are eligible to join our new
advertising sales force beginn
in the fall.
Part-time jobs are open on the
Michigan Daily to sell advert
and create new advertising m
Earn money on a commissionI
while you gain valuable exper
(We are especially seeking so
who have access to a car)
Call DAVE PFEFFER, RANDY R
or KEN KRAUS at 764-0560,
Monday thru Friday 1-4 P.M.

z

FARAH IRONS OUT THE WRINKLES
BEFORE THEY COME: IN HOPSACK
SLACKS THAT NEVER NEED PRESSING
Trimly cut slacks in a lightweight
hopsack that's permanently-pressed,
never needs ironing. Farah tailors
them in a traditional plain-front
model with belt loops, on- seam
pockets, and pre-cuffed bottoms. In
dark blue, dark olive, black, light
rrrtu nr ridt. aiZt Qi7PO?-V

Same Price.
It's true this sleek new Honda Scrambler 125 would cost
you the same money as the old used bomb, but the low
price isn't the whole Honda story. Far from it.
When you ride any of Honda's 23 models, you can forget
high insurance, upkeep, and maintenance costs. Forget
parking problems too.
And look at the Scrambler 125 styling: new candy
colors, chrome fenders, trim new forks, upswept pipes.
And performance: the 125's dependable 4-stroke varallel
twin OHC engine delivers an impressive 13 hp at 10,000

.4I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan