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March 31, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-31

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Sunday, March 31, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Sudy ac 3,16 I MCIA AL

_ ... _

VIETNAM ROUNDUP:
Second Super-Jet Crashes;
Laird Hints Bombing Pause

Ten Nations Act Israel Vows Reprisals

On Paper Gold

For

Future

Attacks;

By The Associated Press
it A second of the six new U.S.
F-111-A jets that entered the Vi-
etnam war less than a week ago
has-crashed, the Air Force report-
ed today. Its two crewmen were
rescued.
The Pentagon in Washington
said the plane .crashed yesterday
in Thailand - indicating it ran
into mechanical trouble rather
than enemy gunfire. The planes
are based in Thailand.
The first of the $6 million su-
personic, swingwing fighter bomb-
ers vanished Thursday. North Vi-
etnam claimed its forces shot it
down. U.S. officials have said on-
ly the plane and its crewmen are
missing.
In its announcement of the loss
of the second plane, the Air Force
in Saigon said: "A second F111-A
Sniper Rumor
Scares Powell
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (P)-Adam
Clayton Powell, described as ner-
vous about a rumor of a white
* sniper in Gainesville, refused to
leave his fishing resort in Bimini
yesterday to make a scheduled
speech at the University of Flor-
ida.
Wayne Fulton, president of the
organization which invited Pow-
ell, the Afro-American Student;
Association, remained behind with:
the deposed Congressman to try
and talk him into changing his
mind.
Fred Fevrier, the pilot sent to
pick Powell up, said Powell was
nervous about the reported shoot-
ings and would not leave the Ba-
hamian island off the coast of
Florida, where he remained in
exile until his dramatic return to
Harlem last week.
Police confirmed that three Ne-
groes were shot early yesterday,
one fatally. No charges were fil-
ed and police said they did not
know whether the assailant was
white or black.
However, Alachua County Sher-
iff's Lt. Ronald Stanley, describ-
ed the incident as a "plain old
barroom shooting. It has no ra-
cial overtones or any other over-
tones to it at all."
Powell was scheduled to address
a 4 p.m. news conference and a
7 p.m. assembly.

Unless Johnson intervenes, the STOCKHOLM (R)--Nine of the
BULLETIN . Air Force and Navy plan heavy world's 10 richest nations decided
strikes on North Vietnam's heart- yesterday to create a new kind of
SAIGON (A) - South Viet- land, possibly including new tar- "paper gold" that may eventually
nam will order a general mo- gets, replace the old metal as the basis
bilization this fall if the Viet G WllMof the world's currencies.
Cong continue their attacks, en. iiam . omyer, com- Finance Minister Michel Debre
President Nguyen Van Thieu mander of the U.S. 7th Air Force of France refused to go along.
said today. He said all men be- a dprycommander for a "The special drawing rights,"
tween the ages of 17 and 45 U.S. air operations over Vietnam "Tescildangrht,
and Laos, said last month his big- he said, "are no longer that form
would be drafted and women gest problem was "getting a of supplementary credit which we
also would be called up. gstr oble weah"eing a judged useful. They are, I fear,
stretch of good weather in whichj"
I can exploit the target systems an expedient - and they may be
crashed in Southeast Asia yester- that I've got assigned. the beginning of a so-called rnon-
day after an in-flight emergency. "Once I've been able to effec- ey which will bring great disap-
The two crewmen have been res- pointment to those who give it
cued." tively deal with these targets their confidence."
The term "in flight emergency" then I think the question of ad- The Unitetd States, $ritain,
also suggested mechanical trouble. ditional targets should be brought West Germany, Italy, Japan, Bel-3
The Fills first went into com- under examination." gium, Holland, Canada and Swe-
bat over North Vietnam-mainly
in the Southern Panhandle area- PRESS DISENCHANTED:
just last Monday. They are based 'r
at Ta Khli air base, 100 milesI
north of Bangkok, Thailand's ca-s
So far as is known none is in

den were unanimous at a meeting
of the group of 10.
Swedish Economics Minister
Christer Wickman, chairman of
the meeting, told reporters: "The
road is now open to international
acceptance of the special drawing
rights. This is an important event
in monetary history."
The object of the new arrange-
ments is to supply.the $71 billion
worth now held by the non-Com-
munist countries of the world.
New reserves are necessary be-
cause trade is growing, and coun-
'tries, which buy more goods than
they sell, need bigger reserves to
tide them over until the flow is
reversed.
U.S. Urges $10 Billion
No total amount was discussed,
Wickam said. The United States
has been urging $10 billion worth
for the first five years. The Uni-
ted States would receive about
$2.4 of this.
Wickam said it had also been
agreed to give the European Com-
mon Market a veto right over ac-
tivating the special drawing rights
(SDR's) and over many other ac-
tivities of the International Mon-
etary Fund itself-but not on the
adoption of the general frame-
work of the scheme.
The special drawing rights
would be allocated to each of the
members of the International
Mnoetary Fund in proportion to
its contribution to the fund. The
United States has a 24.6 percent!
quota in the fund. It would get
$246 million of each $1 billion cre-
ated in SDR's.
The central banks of member!
nations would count the SDR's3
among their reserves just as they
now count gold and foreign cur-
rency. The central banks would
also be able to transfer SDR's to:
one another just as they now
transfer gold.
SDR's Non-transferable

Jordan Asks' Embargo
IUN Patrols

South Vietnam itself.
The loss of two of the jets,.
packed with highly sophisticated
electronic guiding gear, comes as
a sharp blow to the Air Force and
could cause the grounding of the
other four in Thailand-at least
temporarily.
A Pentagon spokesman said the
Air Force is sending a flight safe-
ty team to aid in the investigation
of the crash.
The F-ll1s are the most ad-
vanced warplane in the U.S. arse-
nal.
Weather Clears
The monsoon weather which
has protected North Vietnam for
six months is beginning to break,
leaving the Hanio-HIaiphong area
open to massive American attacks
unless President Johnson orders
a pause.
The pace of U.S. air raids al-
ready has quickened and another
indication of clearing weather has
been the appearance of North Vi-
etnamese MIG interceptors in the
last three days. American pilots
dueled some of the enemy planes
Friday and the Air Force announ-
ced a possible MIG kill.
In Washington, however, Rep.
Melvin Laird (R.-Wis.), told
newsmen he thinks the adminis-
tration is considering "at the
highest levels," a 30-day bombing
pause. The White House response
was noncommittal.

T n C

LONDON (W) Prime Minister
Harold Wilson, in a showdown
mood, set out yesterday to reshape
his cabinet after a mid-term elec-
toral defeat rocked his govern-
ment and two British press ty-
coons announced their disen-
chantment with his leadership.
With his approval, a senior
minister, leader of the House of
Commons R i c h a r d Crossman,
warned malcontents within the
cabinet against any attempt to
oust the prime minister.
Urges New Leadership
He did this publicly urging the
need for a reconstructed collective
leadership strong enough to take
the necessary decisions and sen-
sitive to the needs of its own rank
and file.
Crossman's remarks were wide-
ly interpreted as the opening sal-
vo in a leadership struggle, with
Defense Secretary Denis Healey
named as a principal activist in
the behind-the-scenes drama.
Disenchanted Press
Alongside this development, two
influential press tycoons served
notice they share the disenchant-
ment with Wilson evident among
British voters.
Cecil King, head of the mass
circulation Daily Mirror group,
announced withdrawal of his sup-
port for Wilson as leader of the
Labor government.
Lord Thomson's independent
London Times suggested editorial-
ly that Chancellor of the Exche-
quer Roy Jenkins should take ov-
er from Wilson if a reborn Labor
movement is to have any political
relevance.
King's intervention seemed es-
pecially significant. The Mirror

l%-l-qm.qw-wll. %- Mftl

has been crucial in swinging opin-
ion behind Labor in the four elec-
tions it has won since World War
II. It is no secret that in recent
months King has identified him-
self closely with Healey's views.
Wilson was weekending at Che-
quers, his country retreat near
London, with his attention focus-
ed on a cabinet shakeup due for
announcement next month.

-Associated Press
U.N. Meets on Arab-Israeli Conflict
LIBERALIZATION EFFECTS-
Czech-F German
1iscord Increases

Associated Press News Analysis
BERLIN - The East German

Harold Wilson

All Prints from
ART PRINT LOAN COLLECTION
Must Be Returned
ROOM 512 S.A.B.

World New
By The Associated Press
CAIRO - President Gamal Ab-
del Nasser scheduled yesterday a
national plebiscite on a program
of constitutional reform based on
a single national party-the Arab
Socialist Union. He set the plebis-
cite for May 2.

8-5-Monday-Friday, April 1 -3

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WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY
FOLK MUSIC ASSOCIATION CONCERT
featuring
JIM & JEAN
and
THE MISTY WIZARDS
SATURDAY, APRIL 13 8:30 P.M.
COMMUNITY ARTS AUD. Adm. $2.00
WSU CAMPUS at door

The SDR's would differ from Communist government stands to
gold in that they could not be lose more than any other East
transferred to banks other than block regime in the liberalization
central banks. Another difference drive sweeping Czechoslovakia.
from gold is that they would bear East Germany's awareness of its
interest. In the course of five dilemma is reflected in the open
years a country would not be al-: discord that has erupted between
lowed to use more than an aver- it and the Czech government, un-
age 70 percent of the total SDR's precedented in Communist bloc
allocated to it. relations.
Czech Foreign Minister Vaclav
David summoned East Germany's
ambassador to relay Prague's ob-
jections to a speech by Kurt Ha-
ger, a member of the East Germ-
an party's politburo.
Nasser said that if the elector- "Socialistic Democratization"
ate approves his program, as ex- age d publicly criticized
pected, he will immediately start macrtizaton" solaigitote
teprocess of electing delegates 'mohiandso Wes Gerang atte
to the Socialist Union national tonslitWest German attempts
congress, which then would write pit the Communist up rea-
the new permanent constitution tions with the East Germans,
for Egypt. there had been a similar East Ger-
man outburst, but nothing like
NEW YORK' - Police ordered
a city-wide watch yesterday at tin 20 years in power, the East
military induction centers and German government, headed by
other Selective Service installa- Walter Ulbricht, has developed
tions after a dynamite bomb shat- full diplomatic relations only with
tered about 30 windows at the fellow Communist governments.
city's major induction center. Since the Berlin wal went up in
A police detail surrounded the 1961, East Germans have been
center in lower Manhattan, bomb- able to go to the West only by
ed early yesterday. No one was risking the gunfire of border
hurt. guards.
The East German Communists
TOKYO - The Viet Cong said have staked their political life on
today they will set free before to- absolute solidarity with the Soviet
morrow two American women Union. Their economy remains
captured during the Tet offen- rigidly tied to the Soviet scheme
sive. One is an English teacher, of things.
the other a physician whose bro- Could Rock System
ther. once delivered supplies to Czechoslovakia, as East Germ-
North Vietnam aboard the yacht any's immediate southern neigh-
Phoenix. ~ bor, could rock the East German
Hanoi's official news agency, 'system much more than Romania,
VNA, said Sandra Johnson of which is much farther away.
Clio, Mich., and Dr. Marjorie Nel- Should the Czechs, for example,'
son, 28, of Kokomo, Ind. are to gain a real measure of economic'
be released but did not mention independence that would speed
how or where. I their development, the contrast

between Eastern and Western ori-
entation for the East German po-
pulation would become sharper
than ever.
Although the East Germans
have the highest living standard.
in the bloc, they are continually
reminded of their shortcomings
by comparison to their fellow
Germans to the west.
If the Czechs were to establish
diplomatic relations with West
Germany, following the lead of
Romania and Yugoslavia, East
Germany would find itself direct-
ly flanked. The road to Hungary
and Bulgaria would be made con-
siderably easier for West Ger-
many.
Firebombs Hit
N.Y. Stores
By The Associated Press
Firebombs were thrown in three
of Manhattan's best known de-
partment stores yesterday - Ma-
cy's, Bloomingdale's and Klein's.
Fire officials alerted all the city's
department stores. There were
also fires at Gimbel's and an an-
nex to Klein's.
None produced major damage,
as did mysterious fires in Chica-
go stores Friday. Clerks at two of
the New York stores told police
they saw Negroes hurl the fire
bombs.
In Chicago, a minor fire burned
briefly yesterday in Goldblatt
Brothers in the latest of a series
of fires in big State Street depart-
ment stores. A small fire in aI
basement stereoroom table wasE
was extinguished by the sprinkler
system. John Pirie, Jr., chairman
of Carson, Pirie Scott & Co. -
where damages from Friday's fire
were in the millions of dollars-
said the fires "definitely are ar-
son."

Demuanded
By Goldberg
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. () -
Amid signs of fading peace pros-
pects in the Middle East the UN
Security Council yesterday heard
a vow by the Israelis to continue
a policy of military reprisals for
Arab guerrilla raids and a demand
by Jordan for an arms embargo
against Israel.
Israeli Ambassador Yosef Te-
koah served notice on the council
that new military blows by Israel
would be his country's forceful re-
ply to continued activity by Arab
guerrillas. He said this amounted
to Arab warfare under the guise
of liberation movements in Israeli
occupied Arab territory.
Asks Harsher Penalties
Jordan called upon the 15-
nation council to impose harsh
penalties upon Israel possible un-
der the UN charter, including an
arms embargo.
Deploring the new outbreak of
violence on Friday that led both
Israel and Jordan to ask for the
urgent meeting of the council,
U.S. Ambassador Arthur J. Gold-
berg proposed the stationing of
UN observers along the explosive
Israeli-Jordan cease-fire line.
Soviet Ambassador Jacob A.
Malik said that sanctions against
Israel should be the next course
of action by the council. He stres-
sed eonomic aspects of such ac-
tion.
While the 15-nation council was
in emergency session Secretary
General U Thant distributed a
report saying his special peace
envoy in the Middle East, Gunnar
Jarring of Sweden, had found a
"basic difference of outlook" be-
tween the Arabs and Israel.
This was the first publicized
report of any substance on the
Jarring mission, undertaken last
December. There had been un-
official reports that Jarring was
meeting failure in his private talks
with. Israeli, Egyptian and Jor-
dian officials. He has been trying
to arrange ' peace talks at his
headquarters in Nicosia on Cy-
prus.,
The council met for almost 2 Vf
hours, adjourning at 1:32 p.m.
subject to call. This was to give
time for members to consult on
what action to be taken, and an-
other meeting was not likely be-
fore tomorrow.
Turns Down Demand
South Africa was reported on
good authority to have turned
down a third demand from the,
council that it release South West
African nationalists convicted of
terrorism under South African
law.
South Africa Ambassador Mat-
thys I. Botha gave Thant a letter
on the subject from Foreigi Min-
ister Hilgard Muller. Thant was
expected to give the. council a
written report on South Africa's
position tomorrow.
Thirty three South West Afri-
cans were convicted in Pretoria,
South Africa, Feb. 9 and sen-
tenced to prison terms ranging
from five years to life. Three of
the sentences were suspended.
The council held that the trial
was illegal because the General
Assembly had deprived South
Africa of its mandate over South
West Africa in 1966.

A MUSKET
PETITION NOW for
CHOREOGRAPH ER
Petitions available in
MUSKET OFFICE
2nd floor Michigan Union
due WEDNESDAY, April 3

I

LEN QUENON
Believes:
"In The Eight-Month Lease"
DEMOCRAT SECOND WARD

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Paid Political
Announcement

Vote Monday, April 1

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
presents

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UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

GEOGRAPHY 592
"The Dimensions of Cognitive Space"
presents
JEAN COCTEAU'S film
ORPH EUS
at
NEWMAN CENTER

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EXCLUSIVE U.S. ENGAGEMENT of
STRATFORD
NATIONAL THEATRE OF CANADA
SHAKESPEARL'5

Tuesday, April 2

7:30 p.m. i

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(Paid Political Announcement)
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