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March 28, 1968 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-28

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Thursday, March 28, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Thurday Mach 2, 168 HE MCHIAN AIL

KING'S MARCH ON THE CAPITAL:
Making the World of the

Poor Visible

FREE MOVIE
"Lilies of the Field"
7:30 p.m.
Friday, March 29
Bursley Dining Room

WASHINGTON OP)-Although
faded with age, the newspaper
photograph fills a prominent
* space on the wall at Poor Peo-
ple's Campaign headquarters, a
constant reminder of the two
worlds Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. hopes to force into confron-
tation.
It shows President Johnson
smiling behind a table piled
M high with food at an LBJ
Ranch barbecue. Across the yel-
lowing newsprint one word is
writen in large, red capital let-
ters: "POVERTY."
To some, this is also a re-
minder of just how difficult a
task King has staked out for
his nonviolent, Southern based
and nearly broke Southern
Christian Leadership Confer-
ence-SLLC.
Millions
The Johnson administration's
own figures show 11.5 million
American families of all colors
live in the cheerless, often
hopeless world of poverty.
The fact that their world is
usually invisible to those who
don't live in it has brought
King to the nation's capital for
a summer long "camp in." He
Intends to make the invisible,
visible and do it with a
campaign far larger and more
massive than any he has run
before.
The spring campaign will not
be another good natured, one
day march on Washington like
the one in 1963, King told a
meeting of 100 Washington Ne-
gro leaders last month.
It will be a "militant" camp-
in, where people will stay "un-
til we get a response. Nonvio-
lence, he said, "must go all out
at this stage," for some way

King and Humphrey: Washington Was Once Friendlier

must be found to "transmute
the inchoate rage of the ghetto
into constructive, channels or
we're going to have darker
nights of frustration and vio-
lence."
With only a month to go be-
fore the April 22 starting date,
it's hard to find many people
in Washington, Negro or white,
politicians, civil servants or
laborers, who feel confident
that King will get anything re-
motely close to the estimated
10 billion a year "bill of rights
for the poor" he is demanding.
Many, particularly in the Ne-
gro community and the church-
es, are outspokenly in favor of
what King is trying to do. But

they believe Congress is in any-
thing but a receptive mood, af-
ter the 1967 summer riots.
National civil rights leaders
have been decidedly cool to
King's campaign giving him no
visible support.
Baynard Rustin, organizer of
the 1963 march, said he con-
sidered King's campaign a
waste of time, and recently told
a Florida news conference he
had failed in attempts to per-.
suade King that the program
was futile because of Congress
attitude.
A similarly gloomy, atmos-
phere had been felt at times at
King's Washington headquar-
ters.
Confidence
But the gloom has lifted in
recent weeks, replaced by an
air of quiet confidence. Top
organizers said the new con-
fidence was triggered by several
factors, including the report of
the President's Commission on
Civil Disorders with its em-
phasis on jobs and a minimum
family income, and a sudden
increase in support from local
organizations.
The demands King is making
are enormous: A guaranteed
minimum income for all cit-
izens, meaningful jobs for every
one, adequate education for all
children and adults, adequate

job training programs, adequate
medical care, housing and legal
aid for all.
King's organizers want to
keep things flexible, so that
major changes in strategy can
be made even at the last min-
ute, if circumstances dictate.
A general outline was readied
at a toplevel staff meeting in
Atlanta last week.
Plead
Anthony Henry, King's de-
puty coordinator, said King
plans to spend the first few
days after April 22°with about
100 Negro community leaders
:vialting congressional leaders
'to plead for action. They may
stage sit-ins if several days of
this bring no favorable re-
sponse.
Poor people won't begin rid-
ing and marching on Washing-
ton until King has decided he
and the 100 leaders are getting
nowhere. The organizers esti-
mated it would take four days
or more for an estimated 3,000
poor to ride and walk to Wash-
ington.
Field staffs holding work-
shops in a dozen major cities-
King is well aware of the need
to make sure everyone adheres
to nonviolence-report no trou-
ble getting enough volunteers.
After a couple more days to
set up the tent city, to be called

"New City of Hope," all volun-
teers will visit congressman andI
-if there are still no results
-stage sit-ins in their offices.
King is also considering large
weekend marches for people
who work but want to partici-
pate. These could continue all
summer.
To house and feed such an
army King is counting heavily
on Washington's Negro and
white communities.
Both donations and offers of
help have picked up in the past
couple of weeks, and the six
Washington organizers are kept
busy meeting with groups who
want to know what King has
planned.
The American Federation of
Teachers promised to set up
"freedom schools" for the chil-
dren who will be coming. The
Medical Committee for Human
Rights, which has worked with
King on previous campaigns,
is planning medical care.
King said he has pledges
from various militant groups,
including the Student Non-
violent Coordinating Commit-
tee, that will not interfere
with his plans. SNCC has not
officially endorsed the cam-
paign, but individual members
keep dropping by to help.
Save Trouble
Stokeley Carmichael said last
month he did not believe in
King's nonviolent approach, but
was willing to see it through
because "if it works, it'll save
uk a lot of trouble."
Before the Poor People's cam-
paign organizers had rounded
out their committee structure,
government officials said fed-
eral and city authorities will be
better and more massively pre-
pared than at any such protest
in history, including King's
1965 march from Selma to
Montgomery, Ala.
Conme to my
ELECTION VICTORY
BALL
Saturday eve., March 30
OLD HEIDELBURG
211 N. Main

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11

(following special Sabbath Service)

AMERICAN-THAI RELATIONS:
Prostitutes Not Appreciated

M i//el J t tllatkn '( O ( (aice/'
ADDRESS BY
DR. MARVIN FELHEIM
Professor of English
1968-1969 OFFICERS
DAVID MOVSKY ........................................President
GIGI GOLDIN ........... .................. Cultural Vice President
PEPPY GOLDSTEIN ......................... ..Social Vice President
DORIS SELIGSON.......... ..............Religious Vice President
MARILYN ZIFF...................................... Secretary
BRIAN ZEMACH..................... ...............Treasurer

11

From Wire Service Reports
BANGKOK, Thailand-Your
wife cooks over an open fire
or on an out-moded stove while
the foreigner nearby not only
has an electric stove but elec-
tric canopeners and carving
knives as well.
Your sister is pregnant by
another foreigner and he's leav-
ing in two months.
That's the relationship many
Thais have to Americans, and
they are begining to complain.
This situation has prompted'
Thailand to commission its Na-
tional Research Council to con-
duct a survey to find out what
Thais think of Americans.
Outbursts
The government - sponsored
survey follows several recent
outbursts of anti-Americanism,
brought about by the buildup
of American troops in Thailand.
They now number some 45,000.
Thais, normally an urbane,
polite people who rarely say
what they think; have begun
to be more outspoken about the
4 Americans.
The first thing that shocks
them is that many Thai girls
turn to prostitution as a way of

earning an easy living from the
free spending Americans.
In the town of Tahkli it is
estimated there are 1,000 prosti-
tutes registered with an Amer-
ican doctor and probably 1,000
more who are not registered.
10 Per Cent
This is about 10 per cent of
the town's population.
The figure for all Thailand,
including the towns that have
sprung up around the six big
airbases used to bomb North
Vietnam and Laos, may run to
70,000.
The troops and the girls have
led to the problem of illegiti-
mate; children fathered by
American servicemen. This is
not a major social problem, but
the Thais have expressed con-
cernbabout the welfaremof the
GI babies and their mothers.
Thais are both fascinated
and repulsed by Americans.
They envy their post ex-
change, tax-free cars and
modern household gadgets
which most Thais will never be
able to afford.
Thais are repulsed by Amer-
icans kissing and cuddling girls
in public, and newspapers fre-
quently condemn the practice.
It continues, nevertheless.

I

11

SPAGHETTI
DINNER
TIME
Is Sunday, March 31, at SDT sorority,
1405 Hill St. from 5:00-8:00 P.M.
PRICE: $1.25 ALL ARE INVITED!
BRING YOUR FRIENDS!

Dancing
Entertainment
No admission
charge
MAX
SHAIN
DEMOCRAT
City Council
Vote April 1

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REPERTORY
COMPANY

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TONIGHT at

1421 H
8:30

-fill St.
P.M.

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
Fri., March 29, Noon Luncheon 25c
LEN QUENON, Democratic candidate
for city council, second ward:
"WHAT'S WRONG WITH CITY COUNCIL?"
Fri. evening 6 P.M., Guild Dinner
for reservations call 662-5189
7:30: PROFESSOR WALTER M. SPINK,
History of Art,
"The Tree of Flowers, The Tree of Thorns"
(Religious art in India and the West;
study in cohtrast)

3 NEW PRODUCTIONS

SEPT. 17 -OCT.

27

Thursday-KOREAN NIGHT
Korean folk songs and popular music with guitar accompaniment
(by the "World's Fair" Korean Quartet) classical, court dance,
folk songs with piano, and classical drum dance. 50c includes
Korean snacks.
Friday and Saturday-JAN AND LORRAINE
"Best duo since Ian and Sylvia. They will make music shivers up
your spine." (Joni and Chuck Mitchell). "Jan and Lorraine's beau-
tiful sound is a reflection of them." (Odetta). Instrumentation--
6 & 12 string guitar, auto-harp, dulcimer, tambourines-electric,
Indian castanets, finger cymbals, kazoos-Bozo the Clown kazoos,
taxi whistles, animal calls, and acme sirens.

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er 8 P.- 8 P.M. 8 P .M . 8 P.M. 8 P.M. . 2:30 PM8:..
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Sun.
Wee Eves. Eves. Eves. Eves. Eves. Mats. Eves.
Sept. A TUES. A WED. A THURS. A FRI. A SAT. A SUN. A SUN.
17-22 Series Series Series Series Series MATINEE EVENING
Series Series
sept. B TUES. B WED. B THURS. B FRI. B SAT. B SUN. B SUN.
24-29 Series Series Series Series Series MATINEE EVENING
Series Series-
Oct. A TUES. A WED. A THURS. A FRI. A SAT. A SUN. A SUN.
1-6 Series Series Series Series Series MATINEE ZVaTNG
Series Series
Oct. B TUES. B.WED. B THURS B FRI. B SAT. B SUN. B SUN.
8-13 Series Series Series Series Series MATINEE EVENING
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oct. A TUES. A WED. A TRURS. A FRI. A SAT. A SUN. A SUN.
15-20 Series Series Series Series Series MATINEE KtVNG
Series ,Series
Oct. 38TUES. B WED. B THURS.BFRI. BSAT. BSUN. B SUN,
22-27 Series Series Series Series Series MATINEE EVENING
Series Series
Example: A THURSDAY SERIES performances are Sept. 19, Oct. 3, Oct.11
please note that A TUESDAY SERIES performances are not necessarily
opening night performances. ALL PERFORMANC ICNI!NDBLSOHN THEI1IZ

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Number of subscriptions

NOTES:
1. Your priority purchase is
for the full APA season
subscription.
2. Tickets will be mailed
Sept. 6. Please enclose a
set f-addressed stamped
envelope.

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