100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 12, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PANE SIC

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12. 1968

?AG~ SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. .TANTIARV 1~. 1ยง~R

w sva asis~wy Vrs4 +v cwwv a. ,.-ov, i17VU

ECONO-CAJI
STUDENTS-19 years of age and older
ASK FOR WEEKEND SPECIALS
SHORT ON WHEELS FOR THAT SKI PARTY?
ALL BRAND NEW 1968 CARS
Only ECONO-CAR of ANN ARBOR Can Rent
to 19 year olds and older
438 W. HURON NO 3-2019
U.I

TEMPLE BETH EMETH
Reform
at FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw
SABBATH SERVICE

WHITE COLLAR WORKERS:

Friday, Jan. 12

8:15 P.M.

Governme
Big Busi
WASHINGTON 0'P)-A series of'
government reports shows that
whatever may have been done to
end employment discrimination on
the lower levels, the key to the
executive suite is still tagged
mainly for the white, Anglo Saxon
Protestant.
The reports, by the Equal Em-
ployment Opportunity Commis-
sion, are to be made public at
hearings in New York City next
week. The hearings were called to
explore employment discrimina-
tion on the white collar level in
some of the nation's largest busi-
nesses.
This is the first time in the
commission's 2 year history that

RABBI LEON FRAN
Temple Israel, Detroit
ALL ARE WELCOME!

it has moved primarily into big
business, white collar employment,
alhtough it tackled drug industry
discrimination last fall.
Although the commission would
not release the reports prior to
the hearings, sources indicated
these are some of the findings:
1. Although the New York City
population is about 18 per cent
Negro, and its total work force is
8.8 per cent Negro, among the
firms reporting to the commission
Negroes represented only 6.7 per
cent of white collar employment
in banking and 5.9 per cent in
insurance.
Puerto Ricans, at 10 per cent
of the population, held 5.1 per

nt Agency Reports
ess lDiscrimination

,#

I

Ar"
91 ftwoma
m

//111/el

94C irhigttn at t

GRAD COUNCIL

420 Maynard Street

MIXER

Post Office Announces
Proposed Airmail Policy

Sun., Jan. 14,

8 P.M.

Circulation 1-4 p.m., 764-0558

Glick Social Hal-429 Hill

Circulation Complaints 9-11 a.m., 764-0558
Classified 12:30-2:30 p.m., 764-0557

Must be 21 and show I.D. card

Daily Classifieds Get Results

p

11

I

Display 1-3 p.m., 764-0554

I

OBSERVERS WANTED

for

FIRST LECTURE MONDAY!
HEAR HOWE-

Color Vision Experiments

WASHINGTON VP) -The PostI
Office Department announced
plans yesterday to abandon its
separate airmail service and tran-
sport all first class letter mail by
plane.
The new 6 cent rate for first
class postage will remain un-
changed.
Postmaster Gen. Lawrence F.
O'Brien, in announcing the plan
at a news conference, said the de-
partment already is carrying most
letters by air, but only an airmail
stamp-at the new 10 cent rate-
currently guarantees letters a place
on the plane.
The post office plans to ask
Congress in 1969 to formally elim-
inate the airmail rate and create
e new single class priority service
under which all letters destined
for distant points would travel
by plane.
First"class mail accounts for
about 56 per cent of all letters,
and O'Brien said 40 per cent- of
this is going far enough to be air-
lifted. The remainder is destined
for nearby points.
The plan would virtually elim-
inate the railroad as carriers of
first class mail.
O'Brien said, however, that the
railroads "will remain a ,vital link
in our over all transportation pat-
tern, particularly in the movement
of containers, parcel post and
other bulk mail."
The post office expects to pay
the railroads about $270 million
this year for carrying mail, and
O'Brien said the department's
move toward an all air first class
system would not affect this rev-
enue.
O'Brien said "very, very little"
first class mail currently is being
handled by the railroads and "we
have what closely approximates a
total airlift service now."
The department expects to pay
the airlines this year about $150
million for transporting mail.
O'Brien said that although airmail

revenue now totals about $114
million he believes that the rev-
enue loss which would result from
eliminating the higher priced air-
mail service will be limited because
of improved handling.
The post office, O'Brien said,
developed much of its current air-
lift service during the past year
expanding from 14 to more than
500 the number of cities receiving
such service.
O'Brien said, "Establishment of
the airlift network was fore-
shadowed by decline of railroad
transportation schedules available
to us for hauling first class mail."
Currently the post office has about
741 passenger trains available to
handle mail. There were 10,000
such trains 30 years ago and 2,627
as recently as 11 years ago.
"During this time, in more than
two thirds of the cases, mail was
removed from the trains at the
request of the railroads," O'Brien
said.

cent of the white collar banking
jobs and only 2.8 per cent of in-
surance jobs. Most of these posts
are at the clerical level.
2. The commission found that
the 100 major companies head-
quartered in New York City "fail
to match their economic leader-
ship with leadership in equal em-
ployment opportunity." Negroes
held only 2.6 per cent of their
white collar jobs, and Puerto Ri-
cans 2 per cent.
The commission said that while
these corporations have large re-
sources which would make it pos-
sible to recruit on a broad scale,
they "are, in fact, the laggards."
3. The communications Indus-
try also employs few Negroes and
Puerto Ricans. But the commis-
sion found that opportunities for
women above the clerical level
generally are better in this area,
although the financial industry
comes close to treating women as
well.
It found the communications
media also provide generally bets
ter opportunities at all levels than
do the 100 largest corporations.
4. The commission found that
the city's Jewish population-New
York City is about one quarter
Jewish-is under utilized at the
management level in all industries,
and its tiny representation among w
corporate executives contrasts
sharply with the high education-
al level of the Jewish community.
Jews account for about half the
college graduates in the City.
The commission has prepared at
least four reports to back up its
findings, and is prepared to listen W
to industry representatives explain
what they have done to try to
eliminate racial, religious and
sexual discrimination in employ-
ment.
The commission studies are
based on data which employers
were required by law to submit
concerning their employment pat-
terns in 1966 and 1967.

(

ON-
"The .Idea of the Modern"
"Anarchy and Authority in
American Literature"
"Trends in American Society,'
"Radical Resistance: Successor
or Suicide ?"
"The American Revolutionary
Tradition"
"The World of a Writer"
WITH-
Sklar, Bluestone, Mauer,
Bernard, Paper, Wood, Felheim
AT-
Canterbury House, Guild House,
Hillel, Residential College
IRVING HOWE

You must be Color Blind, or
Deuteranomalous,
Protanomalous,
Deuteranopic, or
Protanopic
2-6 hours per week
Rates: Make me an offer
CALL: G. B. Lee-764-0574
or walk in-5080 Kresge I I

(Continued from Page 5)
Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield
Museum Dearborn, Mich. -- Openings
for women 18 and over as guides, paid
trng. Interviews held in Dearborn Jan.
15-26.
Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Liv-
ermore, Calif. Openings in scientific
and engineering research areas. Dead-
linefor filing applications is Jan, 15.
CAMP Contestaga, Boys camp, Ohio.
Interview Jan. 12, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Open-
ings for trip master, cabin counselor
spec, In waterfront, and kitchen help.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT SERVICE
Make Interview Appointments at
Room 128-H, West Engrg. Bdg. unless
otherwise specified.
January t9, 1968
American Standard, Inc. - Industrial
Div.

Industrial Controls Div.
Missile Systems Div.
Research Labs."
Carrier Air Conditioning Co.
Digital Equipment Corp.
Ethyl Corporation - Detroit R & D
Firestone Tire & Rubber Co.
Firestone International Co.
Corporate Training Program
General Tire & Rubber Co.
Litton Industries - Guidance &
Control Systems Div.
Modine Manufacturing Co.
A. 0. Smith Corporation
Sperry Rand Corp. - Sperry Flight
Systems Div.
U.S. Gov't - Puget Sound Naval
Shipyard.
Engineering Placement Meeting: No. 1
3 "Interviewing Workshop." Playback of
recorded live interivew with discussion
based on the principles of th preceding
meeting. Third of four meetings. Pro-
fessor J. G. oYung, January 15, 4:00
p.m. in Room 229, West Engineering
Building, and 7:30 p.m. in Room 311,
West Engineering Building. (After-
noon and evening meetings will be
the same). "

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN~
UwS -'asg useisea .... .2easeeaesa
P:;,,." rc..pi:"" :S"?S y'{i:":{{+.i"Kp?;;n,;. ;,tr,.pags; {}n.y:::::A{".nev}" ;pv.;.;.y; -r;,}?t: r,;ti""+"i{+Ltt}b? :.,

University

of Michigan Medical Center
Ann at Forest

I
I

Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Co.
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co.
Bendix Corporation:
Aerospace Systems Div.
Automation & eMasurement Div.
Executive Office - All Divs.
Subsidiaries

or

l1

T-

WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE

JANUARY 15-28

A

4

NOW $6.00

ORDER YOUR

at

Ann Arbor's Friendly Book Store

MICH IGANENSIAN

in the

U'

-.-

FISHBOWL
(TUES., WED., THURS., FRI

or

FOLK

AVOID APARTMENT HANG-UP$

(If you flunk, at least you'll be awake.)
Sure you've used NoDoz to help you
stay awake the night before an exam.
But have you ever thought of taking
YoDoz to make yourself a little sharper
during the exam itself?
Well,,maybe you should.
Let's say you're one of those guys
who doesn't have to cram like mad the
night before. (Even so, you're probably
not getting your usual amount of sleep.)
And let's say the morning of the big
exam, you find yourself heading for
class, kind of drowsy and unwound

Exam Pill. And before long you're feel-
ing more alert and with it again.
You see, NoDoz helps bring you up
to your usual level of alertness, so you
don't just sit there in a fog; it's got what
it takes to help restore your perception,
your recall, and even your ability to
solve problems..
In fact, NoDoz contains the strongest
stimulant for your mind that you can
take without a prescription. Yet it's not
habit forming.
Okay, but what about the guy who
goofs off all term and has to jam every-

CONCERT

111

Ask for the NEW 1968
University 8-month lease
when renting Ann Arbor
apartments for FaIl 1968

Bob Francke
Ed Reynolds

Bob White
Grady Tuck

Pamela & Michael

Jack Quine

Marger Himel

Others

1111

I mil

I~I I

11

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan