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March 27, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-27

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Wednesday, March 27, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

WensaMac 7 96 H IHIA AL

Warsaw

Paper

Czech

Leaders

Want

Yields to Youths
WARSAW ()-In a concession wherever wood is chopped, chips
to the demands of thousands of fly."
antigovernment student demon- The demonstrations which be-
strators, 'a state controlled news- gan March 9 over the closing of
paper published yesterday their.15 a play because it appeared mildly
point declaration of human rights anti Soviet grew into a general ex-
violations by the Communist re- pression of dissatisfaction with the
gime. government. Twelve officials, most
But for each point, the news- of them Jews, have since been
paper Zycie Warszawy added a fired.
contrary explanation for events Purgings
during two weeks of student dem- The Communist party campaign
onstrations, riots and clashes with blaming Zionists and intellectuals
police. The protests ended Satur- for student demonstrations in Po-
day. land linked three more names to
said, "We're all in this, together," the unrest yesterday.
are ready to admit that not every- Two were members of the War-
thing which happened was motiv- saw University teaching staff
ated or sensible. Let's be frank- which Monday was purged of six
professors and assistants.
The names of Prof. Juliusz Katz
Suchy and Assistant Krzysztof Po-
NorthKorea mian appeared among those al-'
ready criticized for having planted
pp ~~~~what were called revisionist, op- o1CrTTpstnitdesnosuet'I
* Hotes CreW~ 'ositionist ideas into students'
minds.
TOKY ~ Norh Krea Katz Suchy is a member of the
quoted a crewman of the Pueblo acy. n s as
as saying that the vessel had to served as Poland's delegate to the
violate North Korean waters to United Nations and as ambas-
make its mission a success. sador to India.
Pyongyang's official Korean Philosophy Professor
Central News Agency released last Pomian is on the staff of the
Wednesday the statement alleged- philosophy faculty, which has been
ly made by Petty Officer Paul purged of five of its 21 man
David Brasnahan in a letter to teaching staff.
Gov. Richard J. Hughes of New The third name mentioned was
Jersey. that of Andrzej Neumark, son
The agency quoted Brasnahan of the director of the cabinet of
as saying, "During our espionage the Polish Culture Ministry. Neu-
operations we had very little suc- mark was accused in the news-
cess in collection of any informa- paper Kurier Polski of having or-
tion about the Democratic Peo- ganized a demonstration at the
ple's Republic of Korea. Warsaw medical school March 11.
"So in order to make our es- The article said he has been ar-
pionage activities a success the rested.
ship started to navigate deeply into The first five persons purged
the territorial waters of the were sacked from their govern-
D.PRK." ment posts after their sons and
The agency distributed three daughters were accused of being
similar letters allegedly written by student ringleaders of the demon-
Pueblo crew members. strations.

'Democratic' Elections

BOBIJ
Sen. Robert Kennedy, campaigning in Cali
day, walked through a mass of would-be
VIETNAM ROUNDUP:
Khe Sanh Nb
AT -170 -. A

PRAGUE (V)-The reform lead-
ership of Czechoslovakia's Com-
munist party called yesterday for
a new "democratic" election law,
but left understood that it was
not willing to accept the challengek
of Western type opposition par-
ties.
The proposal from the party
presidium was passed on for study
to the revitalized National As-
' sembly which was also expected
to deal shortly with a move to
limit the powers of the Interior
Ministry. Its jurisdictions includes
the secret police.
Officials reports said the min-
istry's governing board had dis-
cussed giving up control over re-
formatories and prisons, the press
-Associated Press and amateur radio licenses, while
"Y IN WATTS dividing the security police into
civilian and state forces.
fornia for the Democratic presidential nomination yester- Labor Strike
supporters as he toured Watts. . These developments in the coun-
try's leap toward liberalization
cane against a report of the first
Iabor strike in Communist Czecho-
slovakia. The Yugoslav news agen-
cy Tanjug said workers at an
e electrical equipment plant at Pisek
rsttin Bohemia walked off their jobs
for an hour, saying they had no
i confidence in the factory's gen-
urlts une ns ie Ieral direction in Prague.
I The presidium's recommenda-
tion on elections involved post-
Ltter, there is plenty rest of the Americans inside the ponement until June of local con-
Several thousand traps base. tests scheduled for May 19 so that
of poisoned peanut but- One of the other American gun voting procedures might reflect
read over Khe Sanh. crews turned a howitzer around "the current widespread process of
Tin Cans and, "proceeded to blast them off democratization./'

represented, offered citizens the
opportunity to pick the party of
their choice.
There was room for argument
on general lines of policy, Mylnar
said, but on the "basis of an
agreement that the Socialist con-
cept is retained."
Informants reported at the same
time that the National Assembly
would vote Saturday on a replace-
ment for Antonin Novotny, the
Stalinist line president forced out
Friday under liberal pressure.
The presidium, in spelling out
what it said was a program to
separate state and party, listed
these goals:
"The development of the rights
and freedom of citizens, their pro-
tection and the material precon-

ditions for ensuring them; a
peaceful foreign policy and main-
tenance of the defense potential
of the country; and consistent ap-
plication of the new system of
management and economic poli-
cies."
Economic Council
The party leadership recom-
mended establishing an economic
council that would coordinate the
policies of all agencies, including
a new state price board and a
Ministry of Labor and Social Wel-
fare.
Mlynar's proposals were expect-
ed to be included in the "action
program" draft of economic and
political changes to be presented
to the party Central Committee
at a plenary session Thursday.

i

Congress Defeats
Two Taxation Bills

J

IN. VttA m

FREE HOOT
at
CgyIYRlBU5Y IOUSBR
with WEDNESDAY
PETER BOWEN 8:00 P.M.
GRADY TUCK FRIDAY and
RCF FRANKS SATURDAY

KHE SANH, Vietnam OP) - The
5,500 Marines at this U.S. combat
base are fighting a losing battle
with a foe as persistent as, the
North Vietnamese battalions sur-
rounding them-rats.
Thousands of rats have moved
into the sandbagged base where
underground tunnels and plenty
of food provide them with a ro-
dent's paradise.
Saigon
Meanwhile, yesterday 1,000 North
Vietnamese hurled themselves in
waves at a U.S. artillery base in
the central highlands yesterday
and were repulsed with heavy
losses.
Shortly after daybreak, the
enemy was in full retreat to ward
the Cambodian border under a
pounding by artilleryrand heli-
copter gunships. Air cavalrymen
dropped by helicopters tried to
intercept the Northerners.
This was the heaviest fighting
in the central highlands since
last November and U.S. Command
reported 135 enemy soldiers were
killed. American losses were given
as 19 killed and 51 wounded. #
Peanut Butter
One of the Marines' chief wea-
pons for beating back the rat in-
vasion is peanut butter fortified
with zinc phosphide, a poison.
For some reason, the rats show
a marked preference for peanut
butter over cheese. And since one
out of three C rations contains

Now with 5,500 Marines opening
two C ration cans a day and snip-
ers shooting at the dump, the Ma-
rines' trash details have contented
themselves with getting most of
the empty cans and trash out to
the dump where it lies uncovered,
the home of uncounted rats and
flies.
Numerous men have been bit-
ten by rats and the bite is worth
a trip out of Khe Sanh. But the
trips involves 14 days of pain-
ful shots to prevent rabies.
Most Marines have learned
that the "rats will leave you alone
if you leave them alone," as one
said. We're all in this together,"
another joked.
Highlands
The enemy highlands attack
came on an artillery base manned
by 500 Americans of the U.S. 4th
Infantry Division. The base had
been set up five days ago in the
jungled hills 19 miles west of
Kontum.
Field reports said the North:
Vietnamese, some using flame
throwers and rocket propjelled
grenades, preceded the attack
with a rocekt and mortar attack.
"They just came marching up
the hill carrying their machine
guns and weapons and blazing
away," a division spokesman said.
The enemy seized one gun po-
sition, set up their own machine
gun and rocket launchers on its!
parapet, and began firing on theI

World News Roundup

the face of the earth," the divis-
ion spokesman said.
The advance artillery base had
been set up as support for infan-
trymen looking for a North Viet-
namese regiment said to be op-
erating in the area only 20 miles
from Cambodia.

It was clear, however, that no
genuine opposition parties would'
be on the ballot. Zdenek Mlynar,
coauthor of the new leadership's
"action program of reforms, re-
jected the idea and said the Com-
munist led National Front, in
which non-Marxist parties are

WASHINGTON () -- Congress
dealt a double setback Tuesday to
Johnson- administration financial
planners.
The Senate voted 51 to 32 to
overrule a Treasury order against
the increasing use of tax-exempt
municipal bonds to finance new
plants for private firms.
And the House Ways and Means
Committee failed to approve Pres-
ident Johnson's proposal for a
tax on American tourists' spend-
ing abroad. A final vote is sched-
uled for Wednesday, but commit-
tee sources said there is agree-
ment on only minor portions of
the proposal, which was designed
to reduce the outflow of dollars
by $500 million a year.
The Treasury issued regulations
last Friday canceling the tax
exemption privilege for new is-
sues of industrial development
bonds.
The Senate voted to cancel out
the treasury action by adopting
a Finance Committee amendment
to a House-passed excise tax bill
now under debate.
Sen. William Proxmire, (D-
.Wis.), opposing the amendment,
protested that it would widen."one
Sen. J. W. Fulbright, (D-Ark),
who joined Proxmire in opposing
the amendment, said it is essen-
tial "to let the poor states have
some chance to compete with the
rich ones in industrial develop-
ment."

1

By The Associated Press
JERUSALEM - The Knesset,
Israel's parliament, approved yes-
terday a government plan to lay
a $100 million pipeline linking the
Red Sea and the Mediterranean.
It would bypass the Suez Canal
as a main Middle East oil route
to Europe.
The canal has been blocked
against all traffic since obstacles
were sunk in it during the Arab
Israeli war of last June 5-10 and
even in normal times Egypt has
barred Israeli shipping from using
it.
The 42 inch, 160 mile pipeline
will run from the deepwater port
of Eilat on the Gulf of Aqaba to
Ashkelon on the Mediterranean
and eventually will carry 60 mil-
lion tons of oil a year.
* * *
DETROIT - As enthusiastict
as if on a holiday outing where

11

V

THE RAZOR'S EDGE THE PURITAN
AND MORE! .E

k j
I, i,
;
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-- _ _ .

!_

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T
0
D.
A
y

WAYSIDE
i!. THEATRE;
N -
Nza
PJK~t

I

everything is free, Detroiters
snaped up at a cash auction yes-
terday what remained of unclaim-
ed loot from last July's riots.
Hundreds of looted items had
gone in four previous police con-
ducted auctions which dumped
$38,000 into the treasury of a city
in which the riots caused millions
of dollars of damage and left 43
persons dead.
Today's sale lasted 51/2 hours
and added approximately $9,000
more to the city's general fund.
Whites and Negroes good na-
turedly but enthusiastically bid
against each other for items rang-
ing from fry pans and a bow and
arrow outfit, complete with quiver,
to television sets and room size
rugs.
* * *
WASHINGTON - A bill to ob-
serve three national holidays on
Mondays and the creation of one
new national holiday-Columbus
Day, also on Monday-was ap-
proved yesterday by the House
Judiciary Committee.
The affected holidays would be
Washington's Birthday, Memorial
Day and Veterans -Day, now ob-
served, respectively, on Feb. 22,
May 30 and Nov. 11.
The changes would become ef-
fective in 1971. The delay would
permit state legislatures an oppor-
tunity to follow the proposed fed-
eral pattern and give calendar
manufacturers an opportunity to
adjust to the switch.

of the biggest loopholes" in the
tax law.
In issuing its ruling, the Trea-
sury contended the rapidly ex-
panding issuance of these bonds
was an abuse of a tax-exemption
privilege which was orginally in-
tended to help states and mun-
icipalities obtain low-interest fin-
ancing for schools, waterworks
and other public facilities.
Gen. Abrams
-to See LBJ
On Iv ietnani
WASHINGTON (M)--Army Gen.
Creighton W. Abrams has slipped
quietly into Washington--official-
ly to report on strengthening the
South Vietnamese forces, but more
probably to talk about possibly
becoming U.S. commander in
Vietnam.
The 53-year-old Abrams, now
top deputy to Gen. William C.
Westmoreland, arrived unannoun-
ced Monday night - only three
days after President Johnson an-
nounced Westmoreland will leave
the command to become Army
chief of staff in early July.
Pentagon sources said Abrams,
considered by associates as one
of the Army's toughest and brain-
iest, will see Johnson before re-
turning to Vietnam within the
next few days.
. There was no explanation for
the secrecy surounding Abrams'
visit. It tended to underscore the
impression that the visit is of
considerably more consequence
than a simple report to his super-
iors on the South Vietnamese
armed forces.
Abrams, who left the job of
Army vice chief of staff to become
Westmoreland's deputy last'June;
has been expected to succeed
Westmoreland when the present
commander completes nearly four
years in the top war job this sum-
mer.
The President could have named
Westmoreland's successor at that
time, but chose not to.

i

yit

DIRECT FROM ITS ROADSHOW ENGAGEMENT!
SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES - SPECIAL SCHEDULED PERFORMANCES

I

WHO?
WILL BE MICHIGAN'S
WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE 1969?

CONTACT Margie
leave them in the
the SAB.

Stern 769-3290 with your suggestions, or
writer-in-residence box in the SGC area of

Sen. J. Wm. Fulbright

I

I

t
s
i

F'

-

I

Sunday & Monday
(Two Showings Every Evening)
FELIX GREENE'S
New
Documentary
Film
V IETNAM

TONIGHT at 1421 Hill St.
CONFRONTATION 8:30 P.M.
ON THE DRAFT
with DONALD VAN CURLER
-local architect and
section leader of The John
Birch Society.
GEORGELEMBLE-local realtor and political conservative
JOSEPH SAX-U of M Professor of Law
DALE BERRY-Draft Resistance
RON TIPTON-Ann Arbor Draft Counsellina Center-Moderator
Thursday-KOREAN NIGHT
Korean folk songs and popular music with guitar accompaniment
(by the "World's Fair" Korean Quartet) classical, court dance,
folk songs with piano, and classical drum dance. 50c includes
Korean sn'acks.
Friday and Saturday-JAN AND LORRAINE
"Best duo since Ian and Sylvia. They will make music shivers up
your spine." (Joni and Chuck Mitchell). "Jan and Lorraine's beau-
tiful sound is a reflection of them." (Odetta). Instrumentation-
6 & 12 string guitar, auto-harp, dulcimer, tambourines-electric,
Indian castanets, finger cymbals, kazoos-Bozo the Clown kazoos,
taxi whistles, animal coils, and acme sirens.

INSIDE

NORTH

THE

Feature Length and In Color

and

20th Catmy-feoet rA
TIrE PJP1J
.In T he Beginning

Samy W UY.PIIR MwY " P(o&W OD e AU RJOiIS
Direded b JIII ON .Fihdi. -15O EulCor hyDetixue

David Schoenbrun's VIETNAM-an educational film
by the journalist-historian of CBS
and Columbia University

BACH CLUB
presents
WINSTON KAEHLER
speaking on
"THE CONCERTO PRINCIPLE
IKI (iKA9 V VKI C'VADr)

II

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