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March 23, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-23

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Saturday, March 23, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Th ree

Saturday, March 23, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Senate Approves
New Ethics Bill

Thailand Leader Hits U k
Viet War Criticism

President

Resigns

WASHINGTON MA-.The Senate
voted 6' to 1 yesterday to estab-
fish the first comprehensive code
of ethics for senators and their
employes.
Passage came after the code
fwas described as too weak by
several longtime supporters of
strict standards. These included
Democrats Joseph S. Clark of
Pennsylvania and Wayne Morse
of Oregon, and Republican George
D. Aiken of Vermont.
Aiken cast the only negative
vote, calling the measure a farce.
The Senate rejected broad dis-
closure provisions in favor of a
4 limited provision recommended by
its ethics committee headed by
Sen. John Stennis (D-Miss.).
The code also places restric-
tions on moonlighting by Senate
employes; an outgrowth of the
scandal over Bobby Baker's lu-
crative outside business activities
while serving as secretary to Sen-
ate Democrats.
Among those voting for the
code was Sen. Thomas J. Dodd
(D-Conn.) who last year was cen-
sured by the Senate for using
campaign contributions for per-
sonal expenses. His case and that
4 of Baker provided much of the
backgorund against which the
code was drawn.
As the measure stands, senators

and employs earning more than
$15,000 a year would have to file
detailed annual statements with
the comptroller general, including
tax returns, outside income, debts,
and gifts of more than $50, but
these would not be made public.
Each senator and employe
would make public listings of the
sources, amounts and distribution
of campaign contributions and of
each fee over $300 for speeches,
television appearances, and ar-
ticles.

BANGKOK () - The foreign
minister of Thailand, a staunch
ally of the United States in Asia,
says faith in America in this part
of the world is being eaten away
by U.S. debate on. the Vietnam
war.
I"Too many politicians, too
many in the press, express doubts
about the United States, about
the government, the regime, the
policy of their own country," For-
eign Minister Thanat Khoman
told this correspondent.
"How can you expect others to
have faith in you if you have no
faith in yourselves? Paradoxical-

ly, many Thais have more faith in
America today than many Ameri-
canshthemselves."
The interview reflected a con-
cern in Thailand, shared in high
quarters elsewhere in Southeast
IAsia, that the political debate in
the United States, particularly in
this presidential year, will be
looked upon by Asian Communists
as a windfall advantage."
Thanat added that he had the
impression the United states and
Europe, "particularly some poli-
ticians and the press, have a feel-
ing that the situation regarding
Vietnam is going to collapse. That
is not the impression in this part
of the world," he asserted.
"On the contrary, the other side
is going for broke."
This, he said, was his reading
of Communist objectives in the
Tet offensive involving heavy
attacks on 40 major population
centers in South Vietnam six
weeks ago.
The attack in reality, Thanat
suggested, was aimed against the
American home front in an at-
tempt to make it crumble, and
"to some extent it seems to have
succeeded."
"We can't prevent yourpeople
from be in defeatists if they want

As sLiberalization Spreads

Pueblo Prisoners Request'
Quick Washington Apology

Anti-Aircraft
Fire Trained
On Khe Sanh
SAIGON (P)-The North Viet-
namese tightened the squeeze on
the U.S. Marine base at Khe Sanh
yesterday.
Besides pounding the surround-
ed base and its artillery support
to the east, they are using for the
first time a mobile anti-aircraft
gun that threatens Khe Sanh's
air lifeline.
U.S. officers considered the
presence of the 37mm anti-air-
craft guns north and south of
Khe Sanh serious. These guns
knocked down French planes try-
ing to supply Dien Bien Phu in
the battle of 1954 that drove
France out of Indochina.

SEOUL VP)-Two months after
North Korea captured the USS'
Pueblo, Pyongyang radio said yes-
terday the 82 captive crewmen'
have written letters expressing
fears they may be executed unless
Washington apologizes for the in-'
cident.
The broadcast from the North
Korean capital said the crew had
sent letters to President Johnson,
five senators, the House of Rep-
resentatives, a governor and their
families.

i

-

I

Newman Social Action Committee Presents:
A Forum on Seasonal
Farm Workers
A FILM:
"HARVEST OF SHAME"
-a CBS Documestary
with
A Panel Discussion:
FATHER JOSEPH MELTON
REV. WILLIAM BENALLACK
MR. JACK CARPER

",

In much the same vein of pre-
vious confessions broadcast by
North Korea, the latest letters
"once again affirmed and admit-
ted" that the intelligence ship
"intruded deep" into North Ko-
rean territorial waters when -she
was seized Jan. 23, the radio said.
"Therefore," it added, "the U.S.
government which had driven
them out onto the road of crime
should and must admit at the
earliest date the intrusion of the
Pueblo into the territorial waters
of the Democratic People's Re-
public of North Korea and its
espionage acts."
The letter to Johnson was sent
by Petty Officer Angelo Salvatore
Strano, an electronics technician.
It said in part: "In the light of
these facts I can see no reason
why the government of the United
States should not officially apolo-
gize to the Democratic People's
Republic of Korea and assure
them that it will not happen
again ... Further delay will only
prolong our stay here and we are
all looking forward to the day
that we can be returned to our
families."
The broadcast said letters were
sent to Sens. Richard B. Russell
(D-Ga.), George. Murphy (R-
Calif.), Eugene J. McCarthy (D-
Minn.), Stuart Symington (D-
Mo.), and Margaret Chase Smith
(R-Maine).
The broadcast, an official North
Korean Central News Agency dis-
patch, said the crewmen ex-
pressed their thanks for leniency
shown.since their capture.
U.S. and North Koreans have
met secretly 12 times at the truce
village of Panmunjom since the
Pueblo was seized. But nothing
has been settled.
The North Koreans want the
United States to admit the
Pueblo was within North Korea's
12 mile limit on a spying mission.
They have indicated the crew will
be released if the United States
apologizes. One crewman was
killed in the Pueblo's capture.
The U.S. position is that if the
men were returned and if they
say the Pueblo violated territorial
waters appropriate action will be
taken.{

to be, but what can we do?

About seven of these guns have
been destroyed, battlefield ac-
counts said. The Americans con-
sider them a grave threat not only :
to supply planes but to fighter
bombers attacking Communist
positions surrounding Khe Sanh.
U.S. sources said the guns have
a range up to 10,000 feet andcan
easily reach fighter bombers
which have been making 200
strikes a day at North Vietna- A SOUTH VIETNAMESE SOL
mese positions. The North Viet-
namese have been using heavy suspect at knife point in a rice pa
machine guns to knock down sup- Delta
ply planes and fighter bombers.
The North Vietnamese zeroed
in on Khe Sanh yesterday with UN REPRISALS U
110 rounds of artillery, rocket and
mortar fire, somewhat below the
recent average, but fired another
100 rounds at the artillery I
strongpoints of the Rock. Pile and apCrolt h at
Camp Carroll to the east.
This was the heaviest shelling 5
of Camp Carroll in some time. f1S u
U.S. commanders believe n that the
North Vietnamese must silencebev
the 175mm howitzers at the Rock UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. ({P) -
Pile and Camp Carroll before try- Israel claimed yesterday that its
ing to overrun the 7,000 Marines blitz into Jordan ripped open a
and South Vietnamese in isolated huge Arab terrorist base loaded
-_Khe Sand. with vast quantities of arms, am-
/ , A munition and explosives.

Sunday, March 24

7:30 to 9:30 P.M.

Thanat Khoman

-Associated Press
DIER interrogates a Viet Cong
addy near My Tho in the Mekong
NLIKELY:
id Reveals
)ply Bases
proved beyond doubt that it "had
ceased to be a civilian settlement
and had become transformed in-
to one huge terrorist base.",
"Israeli forces found there
nine separate centers, including
two headquarters units, a train-
ing base, four ,subsidiary bases, a
supply base and personnel en-
campments," he added.
He charged that the Iraqi
command of El Fatah, an Arab
terrorist organization, had been
transferred from Syria to Kara-
meh and its leader fled as the
battle started.
He said the Israeli forces
found several thousand pieces of
arms and ammunition, includ-
ing mortars, machine guns, ba-
zookas, rifles, tons of explosives,
and many different kinds of
mines.

Government,
Church Push
For Reform
PRAGUE (P)-Antonin Novotny,
symbol of 15 stern years of
Stalinist rule in Czechoslovakia,
resigned as president yesterday,
deserted by his old Soviet friends.
They had pledged privately in
Moscow three days ago not to in-
terfere with the new Communist
government's drive toward reform.
Hounded to quit for weeks,
Novotny had held on hoping for
some sign of an ebb in the wave
of democratic change.
However, Deputy Premier Old-
rich Cernik returned from the
Soviet Union Wednesday with-
what informants said was word
from Premier Alexei N. Kosygin
that Czechoslovakia would be left
alone to continue its "Socialist
democratization."
"I inform you that I have de-
cided to resign," Novotny wrote in
a letter to the National Assembly.
"I have taken this decision after
careful consideration, proceeding
from thepresent situation in this
country and also from the aim to
help the further strengthening of
our Socialist country by my step."
With his announcement came
approval by the Communist Polit-
buro of an action program to re-
habilitate 30,000 victims of Stalin-
ism, and a call from the country's
highest Roman Catholic prelate
for restoration of full religious
freedom.
The appeal by Bishop Frantisek
Tomasek asked rehabilitation of
all barred nuns and clergymen,
including Josef Cardinal Beran,
archbishop of Prague now in
Rome '. after secret negotiations
freed him from 17 years confine-
ment in 1965. Beran was reported
willing to return.
Prague radio carried immediate
bulletins on Novotny's resignation.
In a nation of 15 million, includ-
ing many who viewed Novotny as
the personification of its years
without freedom, there were fre-
quent expressions of relief.
In announcing formal compli-
ance with Novotny's request, the
Communist party presidium em-
phasized that the democratization
drive is "strictly Socialist in
character."
"The party will defend the line
of building socialism and of
friendship with the Socialist coun-
tries, above all the Soviet Union,"
the statement said.
Most often mentioned as No-
votny's successor in the presidency
is Josef Smrkovsky, leader of the
1945 Prague anti-Nazi uprising
and for five years a solitary pris-
oner in a Stalinist jail.

N EWMAN--331 Thompson

-ATT '7 0

]V* " Vietnamese Serious'
About New Peace Talks

MONDAY AND TUESDAY ONLY!

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
PRESENTS

BERN, Switzerland ()P) - The
North Vietnamese government of-
ficially informed the Swiss gov-
ernment yesterday that it is."ser-
iously prepared" to enter into
peace talks with the United States
following an unconditional halt to
the bombing of North Vietnam.
The message was conveyed by
the North Vietnamese representa-
tive in Paris, Mai Van Bo, who

arrived in Bern Tuesday at the
invitation of the Swiss govern-
ment.
In Washington, Robert J. Mc-
Closkey, State Department press
officer, said he had no confirma-
tion. from Bern that the Swiss
government planned any role as
a mediator.
As for Bo's statement that
North Vietnam would be "serious-
ly prepared" to talk if the bomb-
ing stopped, McCloskey said, "We
have heard that before."
Bo also informed Swiss govern-
ment leaders that his government
"is determined to pursue, to the
end, the struggle for the libera-
tion of Vietnam," the commu-
nique said. .
The Swiss government repeated
that it is ready to offer its offices
to help achieve a peaceful settle-
ment of the war. It has denied
rumors that it is actively nego-
tiating to set up a peace confer-
ence in' Geneva.

Ambassador Yosef Tekoahb made
the assertion in a speech before
the UN Security Council in reply
to Arab demands that Israel be
condemned and punished by the
council for premeditated aggres-
sion.
But it was unlikely that the 15
nation council would go as, far
as Jordan would like. Members
consulted privately on rival resol-
utions put forward on one hand
by the United States and on the
other by Algeria, Pakistan and
India.
The United States suggested
condemnation of Israel for "fla-
grant military action," a call for
strict adherence to previous cease
fire resolutions, and stationing of
UN observers in the Israeli Jor-
dan border area.
The three Asian-African coun-
cil members sought condemna-
tion and a warning that Israel
faced tough economic and diplo-
matic penalties if it resorted to
force again.
Tekoah said that what the Is-
raeli forces had uncovered at
Karameh, a village on the east
bank of the Jordan River, had

National News Roundup

AV-w
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van guard records recording artist

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NATIONAL NEGRO HISTORY WEEK COMMITTEE
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7 :30-1 1 :00 Saturday
On "BLACK STUDENT INVOLVEMENT
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BLACK Aud. A-Mason Hall
3:00 Sunday

By The Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY - Utah's
governor yesterday blamed the
deaths of some 6,400 sheep on
secret U.S. Army chemical war-
fare tests.
"It is my opinion that these
sheep were injured by some sort
of toxic substance that was air-
borne and came from the Army
Dugway Proving Grounds, Gov.
Calvin L. Rampton said.
The governor made the com-
ment after conferring with Army
officials, state and federal agri-
culture e x p e r ts and livestock
owners.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The Treas-
ury called a halt yesterday to the
rising flood of tax exempt mu-
nicipal bonds which have pro-
vided private' corporations; with
tax free financing for billions of
dollars worth of new plants.

The Treasury issued regulations
cancelling the tax exemption for
interest paid on new issues of the
so-called industrial development
bonds, or IDBs, as of last Friday,
March 15.
PITTSBURGH - Vice Presi-
dent Hubert Humphrey called on
Democratic party leaders from
three big states yesterday to hold
their emotions on the Vietnam
war in check or face the prospect
of an election defeat.
He said the war is the central
issue in the presidential cam-
paign and -the only reason why
"there are problems in our party.
You can't look at men being shot
down on color television and not
be moved."
"No man has a greater stake in
peace in Vietnam than the Presi-
dent of the United States," Hum-
phrey said.

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