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March 23, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-23

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday. March 23. 1968

__e oT EIC I AN DA L

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I

Jim peters nusaic
Neopolitan Music for Ann Arbor's Spring'

The seasons have been chang-
ing pretty quickly in Ann Ar-
bor and so instead of being
music for a spring evening,
last night's chamber concert
was perfect for a warm fire
and some good sherry. Now
I'm sure no such roaring blaze
would be allowed in the gild-
ed surroundings of Rackham
Auditorium, but the perfor-
mance of the Orchestra San
Pietro (Orchestra de Camera
San Pietro a Majella di Na-
poli) was mellow enough to
soothe an audience irritated by
still another gift of snow.
The nineteen musicians led
by Renato Ruotolo played with
vivre and attention to the in-
tricate details of rhythm and
melody. However, throughout
the evening their many diffi-
culties with tuning and inton-
ation tended to diminish the
shine of their stylistic excel-
lence.
The program was filled with
rarely performed compositions
of rarely heard composers; but
'U'To Build
Cla ssrooms
(Continued from.Page 1)
which jointly filed the court suit
with.the University last September,
have . operated under identical
procedures since 1965.
However, the University's legal
counsel until September, 1967, ad-
vised the University that to accept
construction funds under the pro-
visions of the act, would damage
any court challenge to PA 124.
In September, the three univer-
sities filing suit against PA 124
and PA 240-an out-of-state stu-
dent limitation act - chose a
single counsel for the case. Miller,
Canfield, Paddock and Stone, a
Detroit law firm, was selected by
the three schools.
The new legal counsel advised
the University that to accept the
construction money under the PA
124 provisions would not damage
their court suit.
According to Fleming, it was
not his decision to change legal
counsel but a joint decision of the
three universities involved in the
suit.
Fleming said University officials
had worked with the State Legis-
lature on. compromise language
last fall to amend PA 124, but
legal. counsel then advised MSU,
WSU and the University that the
draft language was still uncon-
stitutional and would damage the
case against both PA 124 and PA
240.
$500,000 for the remodeling of
the General Library was deleted
from. the Governor's original cap-
ital outlay recommendation. How-
ever, the money may be made
available later in the year when
the alteration plans are com-
pleted, University officials said.
Continuing appropriations of
$6.1 million were approved for
elevator renovations in University
Hospital, the Medical Science II
Building, the Dental Building and
heating plant improvements.

Ruotolo's planning offered only
two pieces which I felt were
worthwhile, being representa-
tive of historical musical de-
velopment. But the final offer-
ing, Mozart's Symphonoy No.
29, compensated for all pro-
gramming deficiencies. It is an
excellent early symphony of
Mozart and was the orchestra's
best.
They began with a perfect
rendition of the "Overture to
'Edipo a Colono'" by Sacch-
ini. The o'chestra's sense of
balance and ensemble was ob-
vious here and probably best
expressed. They followed the
practiced custom of doubling
the string parts with oboes, and
the sound was clean and sharp
but contained a welcome Med-
iterranean quality.
I can only describe as
"thick" the sound of "Con-
certino No. 2" by Giovanni
Baptista Pergolesi. The first
and third Largo movements
were most successful because
. of this sound even in ethereal
sections. But it was in these
pieces that the two problems,
lasting all night, first appear-
ed.
Throughout the Pergolesi
piece the second violins were
continually out of tune; this
I can overlook as just eve-
ning's slip but it was accom-
panied by some very sloppy
conducting by maestro Ruotolo
such that the perfect ensemble
of the overture fell apart in

CINEMA GUILD Welcomes
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NEW BOARD MEMBERS
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BLOOD
"LEAVES ONE
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-NXTimes
Wrinen fr the screen ond diected by
Richard Brooks
Positively no one under 16 admitted unless

-Daily-Mike Feldberg
Orchestra San Pietro warms up on a cold evening

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4

the disunified and broken en-
trances and cadences. These
erratic cadences only emphasiz-
ed the "off" sound of the vio-.
lins and tended to diminish the
rich sound of the orchestra.
A sinfonia entitled "House
of the Devil" by Boccherinin
closed the first half of the con-
cert. The two cellists were out-

I

McCarthy Detroit Speech
Attacks Johnson Programs

(Continued from Page 1)
McCarthy said he was "not
driven out of New Hampshire"
by charges of Johnson supporters
that a vote for McCarthy would
cause rejoicing in Communist
countries.
Turning to foreign policy, Mc-
Carthy received a standing ova-
tion when he declared, "It's time
for us to say, in the name of
America, 'Oh, let the killing
stop!'"
"When John Foster Dulles was
secretary of state, he made a
United States commitment to po-
lice the planet. In 1968, we write
history with the dead hand of
John Foster Dulles," he added.
McCarthy outlined three rights
which he said he felt all Amer-
icans were entitled to: the right
to a decent job and a fair in-
come, the right to an adequate,
education, and the right to a
decent house in a decent neigh-
borhood.
He said that in 1968, we can
manage our economy so that
everyone should be able to have
a decent job. However, he casti-
gated the Johnson administra-
tion for failing to work to provide
those jobs.

the administration recommended
only a fifth of this proposal."
Everyone, said McCarthy, has
the potential to learn, but "this
year we will spend only half of
the $2.7 billion authorized by
Congress for elementary and .sec-
ondary schools.
"Federal agencies are approp-
riating money, but have contri-
buted little creative input," he
added.
On housing, McCarthy said that
while the President's Commission
recommended building 6 million
new homes, the President recom-
mended only 300,000 and that
figure would be further reduced
under the new austerity program.

standing. In the first and third
movements bold slashes of the
cello's bronze color punctuact-
ed the not too frenzied, rather
plain composition. Both men
played forcefully and their
sound was beautiful.
But there was a problem with
sound in the "Concertino for
Oboe and Strings" by Bellini.
- Soloist Sandro Bonelli had
many difficulties with intona-
tion and phrasing. His perform-
ance lacked the wit of the or-
chestra's overall performance.
But the Mozart symphony
was beauty. The strings were
bright, the tempos brisk; the
bounce and laughter of Mo-
zart's early compositions was
never lost. This led, however,
to a much too unstudied inter-
pretation of the second move-
ment where Mozart does get
serious. The startlingly sour
notes of the horns stood out
against the fine work of the
cellists. A good look at Mozart
without the inflated sound of
the symphony orchestra.
But conductor Ruotolo needs
a stricter hand; the uneven
cadences and sometimes rough
edges seemed to be his fault.
He is himself an accomplished
violinist having played with the
Virtuosi di Roma whose ranks

he left to found the Orchestra
San Pietro. But the maestro
has become quite an energetic
conductor; he lunges into the
group of performers and stamps
enthusiastically to enforce a
crescendo.
Ruotolo needs a stricter hand,
but much quieter shoes. His
clatter on the podium would
never be allowed in the plush
surroundings and velvet of
some patroness' elegant salon.
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Between Ann Arbor & Ypsilanti
JAMES HEN'Y
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A Columbio Pctures Release In Ponovisiota

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Saturday and Sunday
Picnic on
hed Gass
Directed by Jean Renoir, 1959

MICH IGAN
MEN'S GLEE
CLUB
SATURDAY, MARCH 23

I

wV

I

I

PAUL
MEURISSE

CATHERINE
ROUVEL

"Wholesome farce; a fantasy with a somewhat
pagan moral; Panic on the Grass." - Saturday
Review.

HILL AUD.

8:30 P.M.

7:00 & 9:05
Call 662-8871

75c

ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

I

I

From The Manila Times, Friday, June 9, 1967
"Within the Philomlife Hall last night all was cozy cheer as the
some seventy-strong University of Michigan Glee Club poured
song after song from a wide repertory mainly distinguished by its
bright American character.

TODAY FROM
1 O'CLOCK

dRm

DIAL
8-6416

'Perhaps the most beautiful movie in history."--Brendan Gill,
The New Yorker. "Exquisite is only the first word that surges in
my mind as an appropriate description of this exceptional film.
Its color is absolutely gorgeous. The use of music and, equally
eloquent, of silences and sounds
is beyond verbal description. The
performances are perfect-that is
the only word."-
Bosl e y Crowther,
New York Times.
May well be the
most beautiful film,
ever mode." -
Newsweek.

"Of the college glee clubs that have come here-Harvard, Yale,
j Cornell-the boys from Ann Arbor, Michigan, appear most rep-
resentatively American in their program and style.

"The men from Michigan sing a style reflectively American-
bright, positive, humorous, utilizing only a soupcon of sentiment
-and above all, engaged precisely in the pursuit of excellence.
Be it the traditional Latin hymns, baroque music, traditional
ballads, concert chorales, popular medley, novelty numbers,
Negro spirituals, or varsity songs-each comes off in all its com-
ponent parts precise and polished to an excellent degree.
"As long as romance lives and college .boys pursue girls, the
world remains young and croons itself to dream through popular
songs in taste and character as refreshingly American as The
Michigan Men's Glee Club."
..~.j -."*7 'U i7"&~. I Uk

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