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March 20, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-20

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday. March 20 1968

.. Ir. ,.,. ., ..

music
Mealy-Mouthed Liberals and Country Joe, Radical

By KEN SANDERSON
Liberation News Service
Last of Two Parts
Having disposed of the Re-
actionaries and the Revision-
ists, we may consider the Lib-
eral groups. Some, like "Jeffer-
son Airplane," seek the Liberal
fusion of American bourgeois
democracy and technology con-
trolled by monopoly capitalism.
Others, like the "Loving Spoon-
ful," proclaim the virtues of the
Welfare State with its meager
doles and its pious profession
of "love" for the oppressed
classes. Like most Liberal
groups, the "Rolling Stones"
gather no moss - that is, they
have no grass root support
among the masses.
While outside the category of
"psychedelic rock," the Right-
eous Brothers are an instruc-
tive example of the now-de-
funct liberal Civil Rights Move-
ment. As their name suggests,
these righteous white liberals

prided themselves on their sup-
posedly "black" sound and their
records were, for a time, played
on black radio stations; with
the coming of Black Power,
however, they were displaced
and could only wail "You've
Lost that Lovin' Feeling" to the
black masses who were turning
to the race-pride of such songs
as Aretha Franklin's "Respect."
Of all the white rock-groups
currently popular in America,
there is only one which, in my
view, deserves the name Radi-
cal: "Country Joe and 'the
Fish." The emphasis on "coun-
try," of course, at once reveals
the thought of Chairman Mao
who clearly saw that the pea-
sants are the true agents of
revolution in the underdevel-
oped countries. "Joe" may re-
fer to Joe Stalin, himself a
peasant, or to Joe Hill, who
was, like "Country Joe," a com-
poser of the masses. "Joe" is
also a generic term for the
common man, as in "an every-

City Karl and Country Joe

cinema
Godard's 'La C hi noise':, Theoretical Cinema

day Joe", "an ordinary Joe,"
and as such is much like the
Spanish "Che."
"The Fish" clearly refers to
the guerrillas generally, for
guerrillas, in Chairman Mao's
famous simile, move among the
people as fish in water. The
group openly proclaims its rad-
icalism: they have recorded
anti-imperialist songs and their
second album portrays them in
guerrilla attire. These outward
signs, however, are not always
reliable, as much of the above
analysis shows. The real proof
of their radicalism shows up
only after a study in detail:
their most popular song to date,
entitled "Not So Sweet Martha
Lorraine" is a subtle attack on
Revisionism which validates
their open attacks on naked
Reaction.
Mr. Bordin, whose article was
referred to at the outset, has
demonstrated that the name
"Marsha" is but a distortion of
the name "Marx," and I am
certain that careful study will
show that "Martha" is also a
variant on "Marx": it seems
clear, then, that "Martha Lor-
raine" can only refer to
"Marxist-Leninist," and the
INTERVIEWING FOR
CINEMA GUILD
BOARD
Tuesday, March 19
3:00-7:00 P.M.
Wednesday, March 20
4:00-10:00 P.M.
SIGN- UP AT CINEMA
GUILD OFFICE
2538 SAB,
DIAL 5-6290
NOMINATED FOR
4 ACADEMY
AWARDS

761-9700
Vth Forum
Tues. thru Thurs.-7:00-9:15
Fri. & Sat -3-5-7-9:15-1 1:20

I

UNION-LEAGUE

entire song is about a corrupt,
or "not so sweet" Marxist-
Leninist. The key is found in
this line: "And you know when
you look into her eyes / All
she's learned she's had to mem-
orize."
In other words, a corrupt
revolutionary is one whose
theory is derived from books
rather than from practice. Let
would-be radical professionals
take this warning to heart; lest
they become like a certain Pro-
fessor of History who, when
asked to relate his whereabouts
on a given night in 1968, re-
plied, "I'm sorry, that's not my
period."
1.

INDIA STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
University of Michigan
SPRING BANQUET
Saturday 23rd March-6:15 P.M.
at the Michigan Union Ballroom
Don't miss delicious Indian dinner
and enchanting Indian Music
Admission: $3.75 per person
(No charge for entertainment
starting 7:30 P.M.)
Last chance to Buy Tickets: on
Wednesday, 5-7 P.M. in the
Lounge of International Center
Call 665-3165 for further details

II I

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1

By ANDREW LUGG
That Cinema Guild showed
Jean-Luc Godard's latest film,
La Chinoise, at the Vth Forum
Monday night was a good thing.
Godard has pioneered and car-
ried through a revolution in
film-making, and is, without
doubt one of the most impor-
tant directors working today.
Before discussing the film it-
self, a few comments on this
revolution are in order--these
will set up the critical mode in
which the film should, I think,
be considered.
Godard does "cinema" in the
same way as a mathematician
does "mathematics." He re-
searches in film; he develops
theoretical notions concerning
the relationships of words and
Images; he is more interested in,
saying how things work, than in
presenting events and actions,
characters and stories. Put an-
other way, it can be said that
a film-maker such as Nicholas
Ray or Roger Corman uses a
first order presentation-in real
life this happens, he says some-
thing, she leaves -- whereas
Godard uses a second order pre-
sentation - in the cinema we
say that such and such hap-
pens.
To work in this way, is to
assume the role of critic. God-
ard makes films about film-
making. But this is not all:
Godard is not only a film theo-
retician, he is also an analyst
of social events. He says things
about the way we say things.
He makes statements concern-
ing the "mechanics" of politics,
of living together.

Having said this, it is clear,
that Godard's film cannot be
studied in terms of "plot" or
character. Godard, himself, has
warned us that "the purpose of
La Chinoise is theoretical -if
you are interested in what the
characters say, the film won't
mean much." It is an object
lesson for the critics who usual-
ly fill these columns with the-
matics, with plot synopses, with
interminable ramblings, con-
cerning who kills who and why.
In film, there is never very
much on the surface.
I want to develop this idea
further. Suppose we look at the
plot of La Chinoise. Five young
pro-Maoist Parisians are spend-
ing a summer in a sort of com-
mune. They expel one member,
Henri, for being a revisionist
and decide on a plan for sys-
tematically murdering all the
reactionaries. Due to a mistake,
their first effort, the killing of
the Russian Minister of Cul-
ture, Sholokov, results in the
death of an innocent as well.
They disperse. Guillarme to the
theater, Yvonne and Henri to
selling newspapers sympathetic
to their respective causes. We
do not learn what happens to
Veronique, and Kirilov has al-
ready committed suicide, true
to Dostoievsky. The Marxist-
Leninist vacation is over. Dur-
ing these proceedings Mao's
litte red book has been lam-
pooned; revolution has been
put down by a guest appear-
ance of one of France's lead-
ing philosophers, Francis Jean-
son; Godard's anti-American-
ism has had a field today; and

Malraux and Debre have been
the butt of numerous, slander-
ous remarks.
Now for style (where the
truth is?).
Briefly, I will try to prove
that this film is pro-Mao. Now,
to do this might be of dubious
value - to some people. It
will, however, illustrate the dif-
ference betweenustylistics and
thematics.
What are the elements of
Chinese politics that might ap-
peal to a theoretician? Guil-
larme tells a story about a
Chinese student who makes a
speech outside Stalin's tomb.
His face is bandaged. The audi-
ence cheers 'the war-stricken
youth. This reception changes
when the student removes the
bandages - he is uninjured.
Guillarme comments that the
spectators did not understand
that this was real theater. Is
there not something very ap-
pealing (real art) about paper
tigers and the feel, the look, the
mystique of the little red Bible?
After all, Mao is both a poet
and a revolutionary.

Theoretically, t h e n, t h e
"maise-en-scene"of China must
be fascinating to Godard, who
revels in "polarities." Such a
conflict, Godard suggests, can
only liberate. How and what?
The answer to the second ques-
tion is: words. And to the first:
when there is a spontaneity of
language, when it becomes, if
it will, volatile, the revolution
will be on. This is a powerful
argument. Remember that, first
off, dictators try to control
words.
Looking at La Chinoise's styl-
istics we find that they are in
the style of Chinese politics.
The film is didactic: when Ver-
onique mentions cows we see
cows. Jeanson talks of theater
and the marriage of politics
and culture.- "The Cultural
Revolution?" Polarities are em-
phasized; action is approached
from two fronts, poetry and
revolution. But, above all, the
mode of film-making is ter-
roriste. It is direct, overt, bomb-
throwing. The inconsistencies of,
Maoism are its strongest point,
says Godard.

1 hot
'. .

0,1

FUN & FROLIC
SEX & SIN
petition for
HOMECOMING '68
CENTRAL- sCOMMITTEE
booklet parade
entertainment publicity
floats and displays special events
graphics secretary
alumni relations tickets
treasurer

I

I3i :k

I lli4{.

a

I I

Petitions and Information in
UAC offices, 2nd floor Union

PETITIONS DUE SUN., 3/24 AT 5:00 P.M

Thompson's PIZZA
THIS COUPON IS GOOD FOR
-off 50c off-
ON A MEDIUM OR LARGE ONE ITEM
CP (OR MORE) PIZZA,
COUPON Is Good Only Monday thru Thursday,
" March 18 thru 21
1is w ww w w w w w ww w w s wIww ww w w ww w w

THIS WEEK
JEAN RENOIR
Two films by the great French director
Thursday and Friday, March 21, 22
BOUDU SAVED FROM DROWNING
Starring Michel Simon as Boudu
"A shaggy man story" (Pauline Kael)
Saturday and Sunday, March 23,24
PICNIC ON THE GRASS
"A fantasy with a pagan moral"
Call 662-8871
WINNER
ACADEMY
AWARD

Truman Capotes
IN GOLD
BLOOD
"LEAVES ONE
CHILLED!"
-N.Y. Times
Wten for the screen and directed by
Richard Brooks
Positively no one under 16admitted uness

I

CLOSELY,
WATCHED
TRAINS
A Carlo PondS prueatation.
D. trib:ted :Sigma III-AFilmwiysComp W,
Use
Daily
Classified

A M- Musi c byQuincy Jones S M.A
A Columbia Pictures Releose In Ponovisioes

I

M ICH IGAN.
CLUB
SATURDAY, MARCH 23

Program Information
Dial NO 2-6264

at 1:00-3:00-5:00
7:10-9:20
W-5u uI B EAT
mro IUNALWVAS
JC IMU~NI
p Cl'~LFovr

TONIGHT
RIO GRANDE
Directed by John Ford
JOHN WAYNE
"A good movie!"--Wanda Reif
9:05 75c ARCH.

e Starts TOMORROW.9

7:00 &

. AUD.

uI~

i

I

TONIGHT AT
7-9 P.M.

4V~i1 WR

DIAL
8-6416

"Perhaps the most beautiful movie in history."-Brendan Gill,
The New Yorker. "Exquisite is only the first word that surges in
my mind as an appropriate description of this exceptional film.
Its color is absolutely gorgeous. The use of music and, equally
eloquent, of silences and sounds
is beyond verbal description. The
performances are perfect-that is
the only word."-
B o s l e y Crowther,
New York Times.
"May well be the#
most beautiful film
ever made." -
Newsweek. :U r

NOMI NATIONS!
" BEST PICTURE
SBEST ACTOR DUSTIN HOFFMAN
" BEST ACTRESS ANNE BANCROFT
PHE.LEVINE * BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
MIKE NICHOLS KATHERINE ROSS
LAWRENCE TURMAN . BEST DIRECTOR
" °"° /'" MIKE NICHOLS
f BEST SCREEN
// BEST
CINEMA-
\ TOGRAPHY
/ L. "
GRADUATE
ANNE BANCROFLDUSTIN HOFFMAN -KATHARINE ROSS
CALDER WILLNGHAM.BUCK HENRY PAUL SIMON
PJWORME68Y FROOUC(D BY . " .

From The Manila Times, Friday, June 9, 1967
"Within the Philamlife Hall last night all was cozy cheer as the
some seventy-strong University of Michigan Glee Club poured
song after song from a wide repertory mainly distinguished by its
bright American character.
"Of the college glee clubs that have come here-Harvard, Yale,
Cornell-the boys from Ann Arbor, Michigan, appear most rep-
resentatively American in their program and style.
"The men from Michigan sing a style reflectively American-
bright, positive, humorous, utilizing only a soupcon of sentiment
-and above all, engaged precisely in the pursuit of excellence.
Be it the traditional Latin hymns, baroque music, traditional
ballads, concert chorales, popular medley, novelty numbers,
Negro spirituals, or varsity songs-each comes off in all its com-
ponent parts precise and polished to an excellent degree.
"As long as romance lives and college boys pursue girls, the
world remains young and croons itself to dream through popular
songs in taste and character as refreshingly American as The
Michigan Men's Glee Club."

HILL AUD.

8:30 P.M.

SELIUR PRODUCTIONS present +
ADOE GRUNWALD PRODUCTION
vj~ow °'9

I I 4 : *: ' Vim:.

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