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January 11, 1968 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-11

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 11, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

THURSDAY, JANUARY 11, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

an ... a ... r aii

v

Convention Arrives at Eligibility Compromise

By HOWARD KOHN
The Ivy League's academicians
gained a compromise on the high-
ly-misunderstood 1.6 eligibility
rule and Michigan gained a medi-
cal grant to study the highly-
misinformed issue of football
injuries at the National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA) con-
vention in New York yesterday.

Taking its cue from a year-old
film and documented report on
injuries by Dr. Richard Schneider
of Michigan's medical school, the
NCAA commissioned studies at.
both Michigan and Maryland.
NCAA reports said the Michigan
study would explore possibilities
of restructuring the football hel-
met. Schenider's documentary had

y~CLARK NORTON
~teikijlout...
It is now probable that the task of filling Fritz Crisler's shoes
in what has been called the most prestigious athletic directorship in
the country is entirely in the hands of President Robben Fleming.
The Hayes Committee, a presidential advisory commission es-
tablished to screen candidates for succeeding Crisler and headed by
Prof. Douglas Hayes, met with Fleming Tuesday night to discuss the
candidates and may well have presented its recommendations to him
at that time.
Fleming told The Daily recently that he had asked the Hayes
Committee to submit only the names of candidates who were
acceptable to every member, but that he had not asked for a
specific number or that they be ranked in any order of prefer-
ence.
Although it is not certain what names the Hayes Committee has
turned over to Fleming, it seems likely that at least four men -
Dr. Robert Bronzan, athletic director at San Jose State College;
Bump Elliott, Michigan football coach; Don Lund, Detroit Tigers'
director of player personnel; and Davey Nelson, athletic director atI
Delaware, would be considered "acceptable" by the committee.
The Hayes' Committee interviewed eight men for the position,
all of which had successfully passed a preliminary "test" of ten
criteria - for example, that of age. No man over 55 was considered.,
The four other candidates interviewed by the committee were
Don Canham, Michigan track coach; Forest Evashevski, athletic
director at Iowa; Bert Katzenmeyer, Michigan assistant athletic
director and golf coach; Dave Strack, Michigan basketball coach.
Evanshevski denied that he had ever been a candidate for
the Michigan post Tuesday 'night during an interview on an
Iowa radio station, and said he had appeared before the screen-1
ing committee "only in the role of a consultant."s
However, Hayes confirmed to The Daily recently that Evashev-1
ski had indeed been interviewed for the athletic directorship.
Two members of the Michigan football coaching staff recently
told The Daily that "recruiting in Ohio would be destroyed if
Evashevski came to Michigan. Most of the recruiters down there are
alumni, and they don't want him to be hired."
Thus while Evashevski has attracted strong support from
some segments, he does not seem to be popular enough within1
the athletic department to warrant serious consideration.
Nelson, Elliott, and Lund have been prominently mentioned for.
months in connection with the athletic directorship. Each has a
national reputation, would be a good public relations man, and has
a solid Michigan background.
But Nelson would be the most likely to keep Michigan a powerful
entity in the NCAA. Crisler as president of the NCAA Rules Com-
mittee is perhaps the single most influential and respected man in
collegiate athletics, and is the major reason why the Michigan ath-
letic directorship is regarded so highly long after the glory years
of Michigan football. Nelson is secretary and editor of the Rules
Committee, however, and is a definite possibility to succeed Crisler.
In the end President Fleming's decision may rest upon the new
organization structure which he devises for the athletic department,
which he hopes to submit to the Regents shortly. Fleming has told
The Daily that he has in mind "certain candidates if one organ-
izational structure is approved, and certain ones if another structure
is approved."
The Hayes Committee had previously recommended two
alternative proposals for reorganizing the athletic department
- one proposal would create a separate department of physical
education, unattached to the School of Education, and presided
over by the athletic director. Singnificantly, Nelson holds this
type of position at Delaware right now.
The other proposal, like the first, would divorce the financing
of the intramural program from the athletic department, but
would not set up a separate department of physical education. This
would mean essentially that the athletic director would control
only intercollegiate athletics, a system that might considered most
suitable for Elliott or Lund.
But if Davey Nelson flies into Ann Arbor in the next couple
of weeks, don't let him tell you he's here visiting a maiden aunt.
GRADUATING SENIORS
MAJORING IN
~ ACCOUNTING
ARCHITECTURE
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
CHEMISTRY
ENGINEERING
1i .LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
LIBERAL ARTS
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY
NURSING
RECREATION
SCIENCE
URBAN PLANNING
are invited to meet with our representative on campus
January 15 through the 19, 1968

11 Contract your Placement Office for an appointment
City of Detroit-Civil Service Commission

dealt almost exclusively on in-
juries sustained because of mod-
ern-day helmets.
However, the convention mem-
bers spent most of the day con-
sidering, compromising, cursing
and finally correcting the contro-
versial 1.6 rule.
NCAA modifications of the rule,
which originally said that an ath-
lete must project a 1.6 grade point
based on a 4.0 scale and maintain
at least a 1.6 to qualify for an
athletic scholarship, still re-
ignited old fires.
Even though the rule is now
toned down to require only a 1.6
projection on admission, Dr. Ma-
son W. Gross of Rutgers protests
that the rule is still "ridiculously
unjust."
Gross defends a member of
Rutgers freshman football team
admitted with a predicted 1.542.
The Rutgers president argues
that the boy, a Negro from a
culturally-disadvantaged area and
the oldest of seven children, would
NCAA OKI
By BOB LEES
In a surpurise move yesterday,
the National CollegiateyAthletic
Association passed a rule to per-"
mit freshmen to compete in all
varsity sports except football and
basketball. The proposal was ap-
proved by a narrow 163-160 mar-
gin.
"The rule was not discussed at
great length on the floor," said
Michigan Law Prof. Marcus Plant,
NCAA President, last night. "Right
now, however, any student not a
sophomore, junior, orsenior, will
be affected by its provisions."
Immediate Effect
Plant further noted that the
proposal, as it stands, goes into
effect immediately. But he said
that this point was a "subject
of some question," and that the
council would review it this mor-
ning.
The rule applies to NCAA-spon-
sored events, since each confer-
ence makes its own in-season
rules. Regarding the Big Ten,
Plant stated that "judging from
the way the conference delegates
voted, I don't think the Western
Conference would be affected by'

have had no chance of getting a
college education without a schol-
arship.
Because of the infraction, Rut-
gers-a member of the Eastern
College Athletic Conference, was
placed on a two-year probation
barring it from post-season NCAA
activity.
According to the NCAA, 521
colleges had been in compliance
with the 1.6 rule and 81 had not.
Ivy League schools were sus-
pended from post-season NCAA
championships in March, 1966,,
after refusing to recognize the
rule, but were conditionally re-
instated last spring.
Dr. Kingman Brewster, Presi-
dent of Yale, speaking for the
Ivies at the time of suspension,
claimed that "the NCAA should
have providence only over athle-
tics and not academics."
Refuting Brewster's assertion,
which was echoed again yesterday
several times, was Dr. Marcus
Plant, Michigan law professor and
NCAA president:

"We are not invading the uni-
versity's right to decide its aca-
demic requirements for admission.
All we're concerned with is setting
up an equalized base for athletes
on scholarships. Any university
can admit any boy, as long as it
doesn't violate the rules for ath-
letic scholarships."
One of the less-publicized rea-
sons for the East Coast distaste
of the rule is wide held beliefs
that a 2.6 at an athletically-
oriented school like Alabama is
comparable to a 1.6 at Harvard or
Yale.
Yesterday's modification, which
passed by a 232-92 vote, now
eliminates differences between in-
dividual university grading poli-
cies. All predicted averages of
incoming freshmen will, ostensibly
at least, be uniformly graded.
The only time an athlete must
now annually meet a 1.6 require-
ment to retain his tender is when
the university's eligibility cutoff
is lower than a 1.6.

Michigan requires a 1.7 predict-
ed average and a 2.0 cumulative
average for its athletes.
"Anyway, the NCAA wants each
team to be representative of its
student body . . . Alabama's team
to be representative of Alabama
and Harvard's of Harvard," en-
joined Plant.
Rutgers athletic director, Al-
bert W. Twitchell, reaffirmed,
Gross' statements, "There are so-
cial and political implications here
which Dr. Gross and I feel tran-
scend anything of the athletic
nature."
The Southwest and Sotheast
schools joined the East Coast
schools in oposing the rule.
Paining the Achilles heel of the
Southern schools was the clause
which sets different requirements
for schools which don't measure
up to the 1.6 eligibility cutoff.
"We're against it because it
classifies schools as 'A' and 'B',"
protested J. William Davis of
Texas Tech.

FRATERNITY

Frosh for Varsity Squads

it. The Big .Ten has had little
sentiment for freshman competi-
tion in the past."
Only in recent years have con-
ference schools allowed freshman
competition, and then the events
have been limited to two or three.
per sport.
Divided OpinionsI
Michigan's coaches, when asked
to comment last night, were di-
vided in their opinions on the
rule. Gymnastics coach Newt
Loken stated that "with the pres-
ent NCAA and Big Ten predict-
ability of 1.6 and 1.7 gradepoints,
respectively, I see no reason for
not allowing our freshman the
opportunity to compete on a var-
sity level in the sport of his liking.
To wait out a year has always
been an unpleasant experience to
the. sports participant in that it
tends to hinder his athletic devel-
opment and competitive edge."
Wrestling coach Cliff Keen ex-

pressed favor with the ruling,
noting that, "like everyone else,
I've got some freshmen I might
use right now."
But track coach Don Canham,
while saying that "if everyone else
used freshmen, there are four or
five I could use right away," ex-
pressed a hesitation that all the
coaches shared. "A first year boy
should take that year just to get
academically well set," he de-
clared. "Personally, I'm opposed
to such use of freshmen for any
good academic school."

Said swimming coach Gus Sta-
ger, "It's not good for collegiate
athletics. To face the type of
academic and athletic pressure of
a school of Michigan's caliber in
the freshman year is just not
healthy for athletes as students."
Baseball coach Moby Benedict
summed everything up with a
wait-and-see attitude. "In some
cases the rule would help us, in
some it wouldn't," he said. "From
the students' viewpoint, there will
be a lot of pressures. But there's
still the question of whether the
Big Ten would go for it."

Il

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
DIANA ROMANCHUK

fI

NOW $6.00

NEW POLITICS
MEETING
Thursday, Jan. 11
8:00 P.M.-Rm. 3X UNION
AGENDA:
1 ) Meet New Politics 2nd District
Congressional Candidate-Bert Garskof
2) Plans for School Board and
Sheriff Campaigns
3) Plans for State New Politics Meeting
4) Discuss Progress of Petition
Campaign To Get on Ballot
5) Plan for Draft Resistors
(General Hershey's) Ball
6) Plan Future Work with Welfare Citizens
NOTE: All who want place on Ballot for
Freedom Peace and opposition to the Coroporate
Structure Meet Saturday and/or Sunday
12:00 NOON AT THE NEW POLITICS
OFFICE (109 MILLER)
To Canvass for Signatures-20,0000 are
needed to have place on the ballot in '68
-All can help-inexperienced or un-
registered people will go out in teams
with registered.canvassers.

ORDER YOUR

MCGEI

in the

FISHBOWL
(TUES., WED., THURS., FRI.)

SPONSORED BY STUDENT FRIENDS
OF CITIZENS FOR NEW POLITICS

6

I

GRADS and UNDERGRADS!

SGC

ou

(ES

I

Petitioning for:

OPENINGS FOR
CHILD CARE WORKERS
-HAWTHORN CENTER

Two Seats on

Work-Experience Opportunity with Emotionally
Disturbed Children.
Hawthorn Center offers mature students a unique
opportunity to work directly with disturbed children
in a creative, well-supervised, in-patient treatment
setting - a particularly rewarding experience for
potential professional workers in Education, Psy-
chology, Social Work, Medicine and related Be-
havioral Sciences.
Hours: 32 to 40 hours per week; flexible schedul-
ing to include weekends is possible.

Student Government Council

I

REGISTRA TION
JAN. 8 thru 12
FISHBOWL
WEST QUAD
SOUTH QUAD

I

Petitions can be picked up at:

1546 S.A.B.

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