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March 08, 1968 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-08

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Page "Pert

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March , 1968

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, March 8, 196

lif f

J

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i
t

Ullyot Sticks with

Original

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By ELLIOTT BERRY :........ ..............................
For Ron Ullyot, a prosperous "v
collegiate hockey career has end
ed. But unlike many prominent anywhere and never be a
university athletes, his door hasn t
been broken down by pro scouts
racing to get his signature on just can't see myself sitting in an
the bottom of a contract. office for eight hours a day," he
Ullyot, however, has no inten- muses, "I want to stay in hockeyf
tion of hanging up the skates. as long as I can. If I can't make
Despite the lack of a genuine pro- it as a player I'd like to try the
fessional offer, he will continue coaching or administrative end.
to play hockey if it is humanly There's a lot of opportunity for

enough,, you'll play it
sheamed."
absence of the professional of-
fers today.

Goal: Hockey
Behind Closed Doors
BOB McFARLAND

T

possible. His father is coach and
general manager of the Ft. Wayne
franchise of the International
Hockey League, and son Ron is
determined to play hockey for
him.
"Many players have told me
that they wouldn't consider play-
ing minor league hockey,"' Ullyot
relates, "but if you love the game
enough, you'll play it anywhere,
and'never be ashamed of what
you're doing."
The clean cut forward is an
economics major, but he has no
plans for the business world. "I
I

educated people in athletic ad-
ministration."
Ullyot hails from the city that
Gordie Howe put on the map -
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan - and
like seemingly all Canadians, he
has been on skates since he was
just past two. In what he calls
his "greatest disappointment," the
Ullyot family had to move to Ft.
Wayne, Indiana, when his father
took, over the coaching duties
there.
"I knew it would hurt my
hockey," he remorses. It is cer-
tainly a factor in explaining the

111 L

11
ON"

In Ft. Wayne, however, his de-
velopment as a hockey player con-
tinued. The summer before he
came to Michigan, Ullyot spent
the months at a New York Rang-
ers' hockey clinic in Guelph, On-
tario, after which he was invited
to play Junior B hockey in the
Ranger system. His father was
insistent, however, that he finish
his education, and thus Ullyot
found himself at Michigan.
An alternate captain, Ullyot
has been a mainstay of the Wol-
verine offense over the past two
seasons, scoring 13 goals in each.
But the part of the game which
has given him the most enjoy-
ment-and the most difficulty-
has been checking.
"Offensive checking was one of
my strongest points and adjusting
to the college rule forbidding it
was tough," Ullyot related. So he
concentrated on hitting in the de-
fensive zone. "One difference you
notice between American and
Canadian players is that on the
whole Canadians are more rug-
ged," he notes, "Minnesota for
example, couldn't take it so I
concentrated on hitting them all
night."
Ullyot has been an ardent sup-
porter of the new curved stick,
which he and teammate Lee
Marttila have spent long hours
developing themselves.
"We heat the sticks in hot
water and then stick the blade

RON ULLYOT

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Attention Candidates for Teaching Positions
in Chicago Public Schools
National Teacher Examinations
for Elementary (K-8)
and Selected High School Areas
The National Teacher Examinations will be administered
April 6,1968 on 400 college campuses
Chicago Public Schools will use the scores
as part of their 1968 certificate examinations for:
Kindergarten -Primary Grades 1-2.3 High School Mathematics
(NA .E. -Early Childhood Education) (N.T.E.-Mathematics)
Intermediate and Upper Grades 3-8 Art-Grades 7-12
(N.E.-Education in the (N.T.E.-Art Education)
ElementaryESchool) Homemaking Arts-Grades 7-12
High School English (N.T.E.-Home Economics Education)
(N.T.E.-English Language and Industrial Arts-Grades 7-12
Literature) (N.T.E.-Industrial Arts Education)
All Candidates Must Take the Common Examination
and the Teaching Area Examination Relevant to
the Certificate Sought
Applicants for teaching positions in the
Chicago Public Schools should:
1. Register with the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New
Jersey to take the common examination and the relevant teaching
area examination. Registration closes March 15, 1968.
2. Indicate on the N.T.E. form, line 11, that scores should be sub-
mitted to the Chicago Board of Examiners, Chicago Public Schools.
3. File application for certification examination (form Ex-5) with
the Board of Examiners. The following credentials should accom-
pany the application (Ex-5), if not already on file: official copy of
birth certificate, official transcript of all college work attempted.
Credential Assembly Deadline Date:
Tuesday, April 2, 1968, Noon C.S.T.
For additional information: Board of Examiners, Room 624
Chicago Public Schools
228 N. La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60601
or the Office of Teacher Recruitment, Room 1820
or details in the Teacher Placement Office

SUNDAY, MARCH 10

11:45 a.m.

under a door with books propped
up under each end to get as much
curve as possible. We've got it
down to a real science now," he
jests, "I've probably spent more
time working on my sticks this
year, than I've spent studying.",
Ullyot was pleased with the way
the season progressed for the
team, "When we opened in Den-
ver we were terrible, but we came
on real well."
In evaluating his own perform-
ance, Ullyot was not as satisfied,
as his fast start was halted by a
bothersome sprained ankle and a
later rib injury.
The hopes of Ullyot and his
wife - his high school sweetheart
whom he married a year and a
half ago - for the immediate fu-
ture are really quite simple, "We
just hope I don't end up in boot
camp."

I U

'Academics . . . the reason we are all here. The thing we eat
and sleep or don't sleep) and toil for . . . the hope that we may
garner a few kernels of knowledge, real knowledge, to store for the
long winter of life. At times, I think my hallow tree is more empty
than the Undergraduate Library at 3:00 a.m. on Sunday morhing.
But I was always a John Keats man myself, anyway.
Athletics . . . the opium of the masses; a huge entertain-
ment business; the unifying torce that knits alienated admin-
istrator with alienated student, and pompous professor with
undergrad James A. Scholar (the A. is for Angle); the University
Musical Society of the physical arts. Take your pick.
The connection between the two, academics and athletics, is
sometimes difficult to define. We all know it's there, it has to be
there. Similar to the relation between academics and any other
extracurricular activity on a college campus, no task force of the
institution's best minds has ever been given the responsibility to
define the covalent bonds between them. Maybe, the extracurricular
side isn't worth worrying about, though. The students are going to
do something in their spare time, after all.
Of course, the analogy between athletics and extracurricular
activities falls flat on its face in many respects. The Daily hasn't
begun to recruit high school journalists, yet, and I don't think
IFC searches for high school fraternity presidents who might
someday fill their executive board. Not that it would surprise me
if both do, someday. And most of the student organizations on
campus don't pay lucrative salaries to their officers. But there
are parallels.
For example, athletics involves a substantial time commitment
Ditto, other activities. If the athlete is not a physical education
major, and perhaps even if he is, there is little tangible connection
between his performance on the field and in the classroom. Being
a political science major, I've found the same to be true of working
on the sports staff. Also, only a few athletes ever earn admittance
to the professional ranks, and the same can probably be said of
most other outside interests.
But gargantuan publicity and entertainment functions power
athletics into an entirely different dimension. Everyone cares
about a winning football team. Appoint a new dean and it might
make the Detroit papers. Appoint an athletic director and the
Key West Daily Kite will take notice. Publicity means pressure,
pressure to give scholarships, build athletic dorms like the Bryant
Hilton, and recruit with red carpets.
After a while, someone gets the electrifying notion that the
lower the academic standards, the greater the recruiting pool on
which to draw, and a gradepoint or SAT score never did stand much
of a chance in the same stadium with a flying wedge.
The National Collegiate Athletic Association recently took a
step to remove the gradepoint from the field, when a compromise
was reached on the 1.6 resolution, and they should be applauded for
their stance. The Big Ten has recognized the principle that an
athlete must also be a student with it's 1.7 regulation as a pre-
requisite for financial aid. The Ivy League, although admittedly not
entirely successful, went another route by eliminating the athletic
tender in theory.
The problem, at Michigan and nationally, is just this:
How much of a student do you want the athlete to be?
Again, as I concluded on the financial situation of Michigan's
Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics, the answers are not
clear cut. For you must ask how much of a student do you want
the musician to be. And how much of a student do you want the
debater to be. And how much of a student do you want the actor
to be. It must be decided how much all extracurricular activities, or
any extracurricular activity, means to the university community.
Ideally, I would like a quantitative dollars-and-cents, credits-and-
honor points reply to the "how much."
The athletes should be included in this grouping of talented,
interested people, because they are artists, endowed with natural
gifts in their own right. The punter has an ability that deserves
to be recognized, and he spends long hours of practice in per-
fecting his spirals. So with the quarterback, the high jumper, etc.
You're probably wondering why we can't let the problem slide,
and as difficulties develop, meet them individually. With that phil-
osophy, there will never be an answer given, no standards developed.
The crisis is going to come soon, especially at institutions like Michi-
gan, where academic pressures are increasing significantly with each
passing year, for when I was a freshman ...
(NEXT: WHERE ARE THE TEN GOING?)

4

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Detroit Public School Teachers
Noon Dinner Forum
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I

If your father has enough money to send you off to college,
you will not die in Vietnam this year. If you are a priest,
a minister or a rabbi, you will not be shot at by.Asian strangers.
If you are a farmer, a homosexual, an ex-convict, an illiterate,
a tool-and-die maker, a married father or a scientist, do not fear:
You will never fight across a rice paddy on any murderous
midnight. No one in these categories is ever told that it is fit-
ting and noble to die for one's country. There is only one
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U of M Girls!!
ENTER
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MARCH 29
Entry blanks and rules available: Banks, Merchants, or Call
665-9069, 761-2374, or 761-5475
or write.
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c/o Ann Arbor Jaycees
777 Waterman Rd., Ann Arbor 48103
Deadline: March 11-Open to All Washtenaw County

41

Joint Sabbath Service
B'nai Brilh Hillel Foundation
Temple Belh-Emeth
FRIDAY at 8:15 P.M.
Synagogue Music of Sixteenth
and Seventeenth Century Italy
Composed by
SOLAMON EROSSI
Rendered by the
Camerato Hebraica
STEVEN OVITSKY, Director
Attached to the court of Mantua, Italy, from 1587 to
1628 as composer, Solamone Rossi has been described as
one of the major creative personalities in the early his-
tory of music, and an influence of inestimable signifi-
cance.

I

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FIRST ANNUAL

Miss Ann Arbor

Pageant

FRIDAY, MARCH 29th
PIONEER HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM

Tickets From Ann Arbor Jaycees

111

A I

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