100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 08, 1968 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, March 8, 1967

TI E MICHIGAN DAILY

>Page Five

Frdy- arh8-97 H IHIA-AL

_a;:, Fiv

'STOP ARMS RACE':
Cavanagh Pleads For 'Sanity'
In Dealing With Riot Rumors

Milwaukee Teachers

Threaten

To Close Inner Core Schools

DETROIT 0P)- Asserting thatt
"wildly irresponsible rumors" ini
newspaperless Detroit have causedt
both whites and Negroes to arm
themselves in unprecented num-
bers, Mayor Jerome P. Cavanaghc
pleaded via television yesterdayw
for "return to sanity."
"This arms race must be stop-t
ped," said Cavanagh, in whose
city 43 persons were killed ands
millions of dollars damage donei
in racial rioting last July.t
Detroit has been without itsi
regular daily newspapers for 114t
days because of a Teamsters strike1
at the evening News and an in
sympathy shutdown by the morn-
ing Free Press.
TV Stations
Cavanagh's speech was carried
by the city's three major televi-
sion stations. Several radio sta-,
tions were to carry it or parts of
it at different times.
The mayor said the "wildly ir-
responsible rumors" concerneds
"what might happen next sum-
mer."
He said at one point, however,6
"riots are not inevitable, and It
ca n n o t emphasize that toot
strongly."_
Cavanagh did not describe any
of the rumors.
But two weeks ago the city's
police and fire departments were
placed on a full standby when a
suburban police force received a
letter saying that Black Power
extremists had organized a dis-
University Charter
Caledonian Airways
FLY.TO
LONDON
from
DETROIT
* $230 Roundtrip
May 20 to Aug. 19
Also, Wait Lists For:
May 9 to June I
4 June 27 to Aug. 22
CALL: 761-2348
5-7 P.M

turbance that was to involve steal-
ing autos and burping them on
the major expressways.
The letter also said that'homes
were to be burned in several all-
white suburbs as well as some
stores in the downtown section.
There were no incidents during
the period of the alert.
Pistols registered with the city,
as required by law, totaled 6,029
in 1966. There were 9,988 regis-
tered in 1967, with a sharp upturn
in August. In January of this year
there were 1,090 and in February,
1,421.
Cavanagh said that if a citizen
"accepts uncritically every rumor,
if he buys a gun, if he endorses
vigilante, groups, he has contri-
buted to an atmosphere that may
well bring about the very violence
he has been seeking to avoid.
Judgment
"All of these things have been
happening in the Detroit area. We
seem to have lost our judgment
and our perspective.
"Without newspapers in this
city, these rumors have been
spread by word of mouth until
they have taken on the aspect of
truth and a basis for action.".

The mayor said Detroit police
now are equipped and organized
to prevent-trouble and that "ex-
tremism which takes the form of
acts of violence or of provocation
will not be tolerated."
Control CenterI
Cavanagh directed his Commis-
sion on Community Relations to
establish a "Rumor Control Cen-
ter" to check out citizen reported
rumors, establish the facts and
dispel any false rumor "before it
can do any more damage."
"In the absence of newspapers
and in the light of the present
situation, I urge every citizen of
the Detroit metropolitan area to
make use of the Rumor Control
Center," the mayor said.
The strike is Detroit's second
major newspaper strike in three
years. In 1964, both the News and"
the Free Press were shut down for
143 days during a strike by the
Pressmen's Union.
Three interim papers, the De-
troit Daily Express; the Daily Press
and the Daily Dispatch were pub-
lished during. the early weeks of
the strike, but all were shut down
by the Teamsters.

MILWAUKEE, Wis.(P) - School
Superintendent Richard P. Gou-
sha met in a marathon session
yesterday with Milwaukee Teach-
ers Educations Association leaders
who have threatened to close some
Inner Core schools unless they
were made "safe for children and
the staff."
Under discussion was whether
the problem, climaxed in recent
weeks by rowdy demonstrations
for "integrated" history courses,
"soul food" in school cafeterias
and more Negro kitchen_ help,
could be solved by a series of
'neetings with parents and stu-
dents.
Vandalism
Vapdalism in city schools
amounted to $215,063 last year,
the board reported earlier, com-
pared with $146,940 in 1966.
T h e association, bargainingt
agent for city teachers, said that
as many as six fires have been
reported in a single day at one
school, and added that "fire alarms
are turned in at such frequency
that the children now fail to res-
pond to a real fire."
Donald Baer, executive secre-
tary of the MTEA, wanted im-
mediate action. The school board's
attitude, he said, "seems to be that

we'll wait until the kids run out
of matches."
MTEA President Donald A. Feil-
back, said in a complaint present-
ed to the board Wedensday night
that he could offer no easy solu-
tion, but said it was clear that
"it may be necessary to close the
buildings until such time as you
can insure safety for the children
and the staff.
Uncontrollable
"Disturbances in several of our
schools have reached the magn-
itude that the staff is no longer
able to control. Our teachers have
had it."
The demonstrations began last
October, to support demands for,
'I - = ---- - ---- --

'integrated" history courses show -
ing the part Negroes had in the
development of the United States.
Arthur Rumph, social studiesI
coordinator for the system, said
that textbook publishers ''virtually
ignore 'the Negro" in standard
books on American Negro history
texts, but ordered several hundred
as supplementary material for five
high schools. The school system
issued a booklet of its own as
well, but Rumpf said both mea-
sures offered only a "tempor-
ary solution."
Librarians said the voluntary
texts got little use and demon-
strators insisted that they wanted
the Negro oriented material made
part of regular courses.

AFTER HOURS
every FRIDAY & SATURDAY Nite
1 :30 to 4:00 A.M.
this week featuring
RON CODEN
It's not easy to describe RON CODEN. It is often asked does he
appeal to teens, to junior executives, to the middle aged, senior
citizens, or to children. In all fairness, he appeals to everybody
as his new album "RON CODEN at THE RAVEN" portrays.
Scheduled for the Mike Douglas Show this Spring, and many
other T.V.ers, RON does not fit into any one category. He is a
singer yes, but also an actor, a comedian, storyteller, clown and
a plain down-to-earth entertainer. RON is old at 23, but you
can bet your life he will be young at 63.
COVER STILL ONLY $1.00
the Fifth Dimension

216 W. Huron

Phone 761-7866

TONIGHT and SATURDAY at

THREE ON A MATCH

1421 H ill St.
8:30 P.M.

f

(z

2

N ATAI#DL

VIOLINIST

from Rochester, New York
(presently negotiating for
national songwriting and
recording contracts) returning
by overwhelming popular
request to sing popular and
ORIGINAL folk and folk-rock
music.

I

playing:

BARTOK, SCHUBERT, BEETHOVEN
accompanied by the Steinway,

I

at

$1.00 cover includes entertainment and refreshments!

AR

'S

IN CONCERT

i

-a new coffee house-
605 EAST WILLIAM

HARPER'S
BIZARRE

specializing in fine sandwiches-
exotic coffees - pastries

JONI MITCHELL
SINGER AND SONG-WRITER

Sing FEELIN' GROOVY

Open daily from 9:00 A.M.--1 2:00 A.M.
Performances at 8:30, 9:45, 11:00 P.M.

Friday
Saturday
Sunday

8:00 P.M.

$1.75 per person
$1.25 after second set

HILL AUDITORIUM
MARCH 16
8:30 P.M.
TICKETS $2.00, $2.50, $3.00
BLOCK ORDERS DUE FRIDAY MARCH 8, 5 P.M.
INDIVIDUAL SALES BEGIN MONDAY, MARCH 11
HILL BOX OFFICE QPEN MONDAY - SATURDAY
9 A.M. - 5 P.M.

March 8, 9, 10

Fri., Sat., Sun.

1.50 for admission
No charge during regular hours

B1 Mynr( IvO
330 Maynard

Try Daily Classifieds

9

FREE!

I

I

i

1k

4t

hr

ei

4-

'S

~~/

1k

,w

e

1k
-7

'I

~sei

-4

T

'

I

'S

lei

tl

~*

4-

I

'

McCarthy or Nixon?

L I
*B*Jo

Rockefeller?

0

U U

a"

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan