100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 08, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, March 8, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, March 8, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a ,_ .. __

VIETNAM ROUNDUP:
Senators Attack War Policies,

Demand
by The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Sen. Robert
F. Kennedy (D-N.Y.), in a sharp
new attack on President John-
son's war policies, declared yester-
day, "It is immoral and intoler-
able for this country to continue
as we have" in Vietnam.
And Sen. J. W. Fulbright (D-
Ark.) asserted that the 1964 Ton-
kin Gulf resolution, on which the
administration h a s frequently
based its war decisions, "has been
repealed by its own original in-
validity based on false represen-
tations."
They joined with several other
senators in demands on the Senate
floor that Congress be consulted
by the President before there is
any new major escalation of the
war.
Viet Senate
Rebuffs ThieuI
SaIGON-A rebuff by the Viet-
namese Senate and a petition
circulating among representatives
Thursday indicated growing po-
litical trouble in the weeks ahead
for President Nguyen Van Thieu.
In a 40-3 vote, the Senate turn-
ed down Thieu's request for addi-
tional emergency powers in fi-.
nance and economy. The House
had voted similarly last week to
deny Thieu's request.
The petition, though it is only a
first step, calls on the House to'

Congressional Voice
put on its agenda a discussion of viser as one key way to end Viet-
whether to bring up for a vote a namese corruption.
motion of no confidence in Thieu's If all the contraband were
administration. The direct target dumped "without regard for its
of such a motion would be Pre- worth or ownership," wrote the
mier Nguyen Van Loc and his adviser in Vietnam, the "where-
Cabinet. with-all to buy favors wouldbe

Wilson Assails
Rhodesian Heads
Rules Out Reprisals For Executions;
Several More Hangings Expected
LONDON (M)-Prime Minister "What we have been dealing,
Harold Wilson declared yesterday even negotiating, with is essen-
breakaway Rhodesia's leaders are tially evil."
"essentially evil" but he ruled out At the United Nations in New
reprisals for their execution of York, the Commission on Human
three blacks reprieved by Queen Rights and the Committee on
Elizabeth. Colonialism condemned the Rho-
Reliable sources in Salisbury, desian hangings and called on the
the Rhodesian capital, said Prime Security Council and Britain to
Minister Ian Smith's government take effective steps.

On the surface the actions{
were explained simply: a fear
among legislators in both houses
that Thieu, who already had de-
creed special powers for the ex-
ecutive to meet the Communist
military challenge, was trying to
take too much power.
Both actions also reflected dis-
satisfaction among some legisla-
tors at the manner in which the
government squared off against
the Communist lunar new year,
offensive and the measures it is
taking now.
Legislative critics include a
newly formed group of 42 House
members who call themselves the
democratic bloc. They are consid-
ered to favor Vice President Ngu-
yen Cao Ky, leading to speculation
that Thieu's latest troubles are
due to animosity between him and
Ky.
Adviser Recommends
Dumping Contraband
WASHINGTON -- A secret
military maneuver to seize all
contraband in South Vietnam
and dump it in the sea was rec-
ommended by a U.S. civilian ad-

gone."
But he said that between seiz-
ing and dumping, "no time must
be allowed for 'injustices' to be
righted, which is to say, before
powerful individuals can recover
from the shock and take steps to
protect their interests."
The adviser's immediate su-
perior recommended to the com-
mittee that the United States
seize the initiative to end corrup-
tion before "the whole country
and our efforts on its behalf go
down the drain."
The reports were made avail-
able to Sen. Ernest Gruening (D-
Alaska), chairman of the Senate
foreign aid expenditures subcom-
mittee. He promised new hearings
by April into corruption, declar--
ing that the reports show "whole-
sale corruption on every level."
The adviser said: "Available are
Navy issued combat boots, jungle
greens, Polaroid cameras, mari-
juana, U.S. and other foreign
cigarettes, Army rations, fresh
American fruit, Communist man-
ufactured goods and petroleum
products."
* * *
U.S. Combat
Deaths Multiply
SAIGON-Hard fighting through
the first nine weeks of 1968 has
escalated American combat deaths
in Vietnam to a rate nearly three
times that in the same period a
year ago, official figures showed
Thursday.
Allied-spokesmen consider the+
Viet Cong and their North Vietna-
mese allies, who sacrificed battal-
ion after battalion in the lunar
new year offensive, have lost men
at a far higher rate.
The U.S. Command announced
542 Americans were killed in ac-
tion last week, a toll surpassed
only by the 543 who fell in the
week of Feb. 11-17.
The death roll since Jan. 1 had'
risen by last Saturday to 3,254,
compared with 9,353 through all
1967. American combat deaths'
through the first nine weeks last
year totaled 1,256. ,
The statistics came out in Sai-
gon while waves of B52 Strato-+
fortresses and tactical jets rained
hundreds of tons of bombs on'
Communist positions ringing the;
U.S. Marine fortress at Khe Sanh
and menacing its aerial lifeline.1

-Associated Press
GRINNING BOMBER
The snub-nosed A7A Corsair II is a new Navy workhorse attack plane which literally carries its
own weight in bombs and missiles. The plane is being used to beat down attacks at Khe Sanh.

PREVENT AGGRESSION:
'U.S., Russia To, Protect
All Nonnuclear Nations

TON
662

1

OILD
and
LAMATIC ARTS CENTER
PRESENTS
KTH'ANN ARBOR
FILM FESTIVAL
IG HT - at 7:00 and 9:05 P.M.
A completely different showing
at each time each night.
ARCHITECTURE
-8871 75C AUDITORIUM

GENEVA (A')-The United States
and the Soviet Union jointly
promised yesterday to protect all
weaker .nations f r o m nuclear
blackmail and aggression. The
pledge is designed primarily to re-
assure India, fearful of a nuclear
attack from Red China.
U.S. Delegate William C. Fos-
ter and Russia's Alexei S. Rosh-
chin told the Geneva disarma-
ment talks their governments will
publish formal security guarantees
for the weaker countries that sign
next month the treaty to prevent
the spread of nuclear weapons.
These nations would abandon
their claims to atomic arms.
Final Approval
Foster and Roshchin are co-
chairmen of the 17 nation talks.
The conference will report to the
U.N. General Assembly, which is
expected to reconvene next month
to give its final approval to the
treaty.
"The United States will de-
clare that any state which com-
mits aggression with nuclear
weapons or which threatens such
aggression must be aware that its
actions are to be countered effec-
tively, in accordance with the U.N.

charter to suppress the aggression from the north. It h'as said it can-
or remove the threat of aggres- not abandon its claim to nuclear
sion," Foster told the conference. weapons as long as its security is
"The Soviet Union will declare not guaranteed by the United
that . . . nuclear weapons states, States and the Soviet Union.
permanent members of the Se- The new security arrangements
curity Council, will have to act are designed to bring India and
immediately . . .'to counter such others into the fold of nations
aggression or remove the threat willing to give up the right to
of aggression," Roshchin said. produce or acquire atomic arms.
British Delegate The proposed security arrange-
British Delegate Ivor Porter an- ments do not affect Soviet-U.S.
nounced his government is pre- relations or their military balance.
pared to make a similar pledge. The "resolution is not designed
Foster and Roshchin stressed for the nuclear powers to protect
that the security guarantees will each other, but to protect the
not be stipulated as part of the nonnuclear countries," one official
treaty. India, backed by other explained.
nonnuclear weapon states, has de-
manded such guarantees in the
treaty.j
Instead, 'the two delegates W t fld N ew
stressed, all action in defense of o i e
a victim of aggression must have
the backing -of the U.N. Security
Council.
Foster and Roshchiri published CALUMET, La.-Fire and sear-
a joint draft resolution also back- ing heat deep in a ravaged coastal
ed by Britain to be presented to salt mine temporarily stalled ef-
the U.N. General Assembly. forts to rescue 21 trapped miners
The resolution invites the Se- yesterday.
curity Council to welcome the Three rescue workers who tried
Soviet - U.S. security guarantees to douse a fire blocking their way
and to "reaffirm the inherent in a tunnel 1,200 feet below the
right of individual and collective surface had to retreat from the
self defense." iC~a atiflma

is expected to follow up Wednes-
day's hangings by executing sev-
eral more Africans today.
Wilson's statement in the House
of Commons followed a Cabinet
meeting that decided against any
action that might break Britain's
frail link with its former colony.
Rhodesia still recognizes the queen
as its sovereign. The Cabinet de-
cidede to confine Britain's reaction
to condemnation.
Inhuman
Wilson discussed with Edward
Heath and Jeremy Thorpe, lead-
ers of the opposition Conserva-
tives and Liberals, the passage of
an all party resolution in Parlia-
ment next week indicting the
Smith regime for what was- seen
here as an inhuman, unlawful and
immoral act.
But it looked later as if Wilson
would not succeed. The Liberal
party said it would go along but
Heath declined to commit the
Conservatives to any such action.
Death Sentence
Wilson disclosed one of the
reasons for restraint: 115 Africans
-including eight guerrillas con-
victed in Salisbury Thursday-are
under sentence of death in Rho-
desia. There are fears among
British leaders that their hang-
ings might well turn into a mas-
sacre.
"Despite the natural desire of
all of us to find a way of im-
mediately hitting back Ido not
recommend we should seek to deal
with the situation by gestures
which, however self satisfying, are
ineffective and meaningless," Wil-
son said.
s Roundup'
tors, were rowing over and back
across the icy Potomac River when
their 25 foot canoe apparently flip-
ped.
* *
WASHINGTON - The United
States is expected to reject a re-
quest to extradite Maj. Gen. Jan
Sejna, the former Communist com-
missar at the Czechoslovakian De-
fense Ministry, if such a request
is made.'
State Department spokesman
Robert J. McCloskey, referring
to a reported announcement from
the Prague's Foreign Ministry said
yesterday "we would expect to re-
ceive one."

Explosives
Most of Africa was in an up
roar over the hangings. In Lusaka,
Zambia. an attempt was made to
brow up the British High Com-
mission headquarters. A night
watchman found explosives near
the building and alerted police.
Later, 30 women members of a
Rhodesian exiled nationalist or-
ganization stoned the building and
broke 18 windows. They were dis-
persed by police.
Protesters
Arrested In
S. Carolina
COLUMBIA, S.C. (P) - Several
Negro students from South Caro-
lina State College in Orangeburg
were arrested yesterday after
150 came to the state Capitol
while the Legislature was in ses-
sion and caused a disruption which
forced adjournament.
At least six students were
brought out of the building by
agents of the State Law En-
orcement Division.
They were admitted to the
galleries of the House and Sen-
ate, but Lt. Gov. John West,
president of the Senate, ruled
them out of order when screams
and shouts were heard. He warn-
ed then they would be arrested
if the commotion continued.
About 75 of the students went
to the foyer of Gov. Robert Mc-
Nair's office on the first floor
of the Capitol. They said they
wanted to present a list of griev-
ances to the governor.
The Negroes were protesting the
fatal shooting of three S.C. State
students by South Carolina high-
way patrolmen in a melee near
the college campus the night of
Feb. 8.
The commotion yesterday forced
both the House and the Senate
to abruptly adjourn. The House
was debating the state's 1968-69
budget bill and the Senate was
knotted in a filibuster over a milk
fixing bill.
A spokesman for the group an-
nounced they wanted to read a
petition for redress of grievances.
West advised that Senate rules
did not allow petitions to be read
from the gallery. He said it the
petition was sent down to the
desk, it would be read.

).

I

i

E

"BEST FOREIGN FILM OF THI
-New York Film C
"ONE OF. TH E YEAR'S 10 BEST"-Bosley Crowther-
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST"--Archer Winsten-
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST"-Joseph Horgenste
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST"-William Wolf-C
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST"-Andrew Sarris-V
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 B EST"-Judith Crist-NBC
ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE (BES

E YEAR"
ritics Award
-N.Y. Times
-N.Y. Post
rn-Newsweek
ue
'illage Voice
C "Today Show"
r STORY AND SCREEN PLAY)
OVERE
ri., Sat., Sun.-3-5-7-9:15
Mon. thrua Wed.-7-9: 15
(THE WAR IS OVER)
sareDirected by ALAIN RESNAIS
YVES MONTAND-INGRID TI-ULIN
sEn I,,t odcci
N~rAI~IiDII AII

Act Immediately
Nuclear threats or attacks re-
quire rapid reaction. Western of-
ficials explained this wording
would confirm the two nuclear
powers rights to act immediately,
in advance of the often slow mov-
irig Security Council.
All nuclear powers except Red
China are represented in the Se-
curity . Council. France, which
has boycotted theGeneva talks,
was expected to approve the se-
curity arrangements and the pro-
posed resolution.{
India fears an atomic attack

steam and iames.
They were hauled back to the
surface, in a makeshift elevator,
up the fire blackened vertical shaft
of the small, isolated Cargill, Inc.
mine.
QUANTICO, Va.-One body was
recovered and rescuers sought oth-
ers Thursday at this Marine base
after a grim river tragedy involving
nine men rated as expert swim-
mers.
The men, physical fitness spe-
cialists who would have gone on
to train military physical instruc-

WINNER
ACADEMY
I AWARD
NOMINATIONS!
0 BEST PICTURE
" BEST ACTOR DUSTINAHOFFMAN
0 BEST ACTRESS ANNE BANCROFT

-Associated Press
MARCHING FOR MONEY

PRESENTS i B
MIKE NICHOLSK
LAWRENCE TURMANZ a
/ 1 f
/
TH'
GRDUT

EST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
KATHERINE ROSS
" BEST DIRECTOR
MIKE NICHOLS
* BEST SCREEN
PLAY
" BEST
CINEMA-
TOGRAPHY
) -
3 ..

District of Columbia schools were closed yesterday as teachers
marched to the New Senate Office Building in a public demon-
stration for higher salaries. Approximately half of the District's
teachers took part in the demonstration.
CINEMA II
SEAN CONNERY
MICHAEL REDGRAVE
"dn
"Stark realism portrayed against a back-

NNE BANCROFTADDUSTIN HOFFMAN - KATHARINE ROSS
BALDER WILLINGHAM AND BUCK HENRY PAUL SIMON
M ANDGARFUNKEL LAWRENCE TURMAN
ED BYNICHOARUNELCLAA
lIKE NICHOLS TECHNICOLOR PANAVISIQN'
MBASSY PICTURES RELEASE

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
5th FOX EASTERN THEATRES 0
WEEK FOX VILLa5E
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"769-1300

Mon.-Thurs.
7:00 & 9:00

N O ..,...>.,......, .:....... - .....::":"":..,. .....,. ....,.mot ..,.. --,.... . :^u:. .. , .

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan