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February 22, 1968 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO :.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THRSAY FERUR 22 IOGR-- -.------.-- ,,a..

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. RRT~A~V ~9 io~R

.avavA l Y#;i} a'a.1LaYV Cal{. 1 (rwGl LVUO.

poetry and prose
I Think That I Shall Never See a Garg as Lovely...

f--

L~A. LS

FUTH AVEI
_i_ ____.

By DANIEL OKRENT
There are few inevitabilities in life. But among those one can
count on is the surety that Gargoyle, the University's sometime
humor magazine, will never be either inevitably good or inevitably
bad. And just like its issue-to-issue record, this current number
has enough of each quality.
As usual, Gargoyle's advertising staff has managed to concoct
some of the most incredible ads ever seen on print. Seemingly
plucked from "Realist" Paul Krassner's "soft core pornography"
mold, Gargads manage to make the most sedate and prim of local
merchants seem like full-blooded lechers. Garg staffers assure the
advertisers they'll see the 'ad before its printed, but one can
wonder whether the merchants are blind and/or perverted and/or
vicarious to the point of ridiculousness. You'd better watch out
next time you walk into Campus Corners, my friend.
But from the high point (yes indeed snicker-snicker) of the
ads. Gargoyle proceeds with a few sparkles, particularly a fairly
cogent rip of SGC-accompanied by Jan Holcomb's extremely
cutting drawings, of /council stalwarts Brucie Con-man, Mike
Devious, Sherman Tank, Ruth Brawlman and, simply, Tom West-
erdale.
Probably the most insightful item in this Gargoyle, though,
appears in the surprisingly straightfaced Gargoyle Philosophy,
in which some unidentified editor asks Circuit Judge James R.
Breakey to write for the magazine, because "Chris Burditt can't
write every issue himself." I don't know how the previously un-
funny Judge Breakey would do as a humorist, but surely he could
:match Burditt's outpourings.

Mr. (or is it Miss?) Burditt seems to have written most of
this issue, anyway, and maybe therein lies its biggest fault. He
(she) made his (her) first signed (how dare he-she?) contribution
on "The Saturday Matinee," and it is mostly an attempt at good
ol' nostalgia. As we go back to the days of -the writer's summer-
winter boy(girl)hood in all-American apple pie yessirree Saginaw,
the present tense stream of consciousness cliches not quite a la
Jean Shepherd begin to strangle and then there's Jack Palance
up on the screen gunga dinwhoopee ...
The second Burditt contribution is an investigation into the
motivation of the much-neglected Little Man on Campus. Much
better off neglected, he was.
The "Golden Treasury of Worn Out Lines" contributed by the
pseudonymic (and I can see why) Miriam Aaron and Janet Suss-
man shows good evidence of exactly why Garg articles are con-
tributed, not sold. They hit a few high spots ("How do you un-
hook this damn thing?"), but the bedroom reminiscences show
little more than the authors' experience.
Although not the side-splitting type of humor that the Gar-
goyle once tried (and often failed) to print on its glossy pages,
"The Great Game of Discrimination" is really fairly decent. More
subtle than stark, it shows clevers perspectives but takes up too
much space. And if you want to cut out the pointless LBJ cutout
on the preceding page, you can't play the game, anyway.
Also worthy of note, I suppose, is the verbal-visual caricature
of Daily editor Roger Ripapart, who gets his scoops through "in-
trepid reporting, daring diplomacy, diligent research and theft."
Mr. Ripapart was unavailable for comment.

Mon. thru Thur 7-9; Fri & Sat 1-3-5-7-9-11; Sun. 1-3-5-7-9
HELD OVER
r.. *,D LESTE 's
"WW 1I WITHOUT ITS PANTS ON!"
--Ramparts Magazine
"I WOULD LIKE TO SEE IT 20 TIMES!"
-San Francisco Chronicle
"IT TRULY HURTS WHEN YOU LAUGH!"
-Stewart Klein, WNEW-TV
"QUALITY AND IMPACT!"
-Ellen Frank, Michigan Daily
SNEAK PREVIEW SUNDAY 9:00 P.M.

Music's Outer Fringe Comes to Ann Arbor

The Very Famous Brucie Con-Man |
if

By MARK LEHMAN
The Music School will offer two
important and influential compo-
sitions from the European avant-
garde Saturday night as part of
the school's "Contemporary Di-
rections" series.
The numbers to be featured are
Pierre Boulez' "Le Marteau sans
Maitre" and Karlheinz Stockhau
sen's "Kontakte."
Boulez and,. Stockhausen are
probably the two most important
contemporary composers writing
today. The two pieces being per-
formed Saturday are among their
most famous and significant
works; indeed, "Le Marteau sans1
Maitre" has become a modernj
classic. Neither work has ever1
been played in Ann Arbor, and
"Kontakte" has never been per-'
formed in its complete four-track

version anywhere in the United
States.
'Le Marteau sans Maitre" is a
sort of. chamber cantata in nine
short sections for alto voice and
six instrumentalists playing alto
flute, viola, guitar, marimba, vib-
raphone and percussion. The vo-
cal text is a.set of poems by the
modern :F'rench poet Rene Char.
The performance Saturday -will
be sungby Rosemary Russell and
conducted by. Sydney Hodkinson.
"Le Marteau" was completed in
1954. It lies somewhere between
the precision and purity of Web-
ern and the impressionism of De-
bussy. The crystalline sonorities
and lucid complexity of the tex-
ture also show the influence of
Boulez' teacher, Olivier Messiaen.
The work eschews harmonic and
tonal implications for a dissonant

yet melodic counterpoint. The im-
agistic text by Rene Char was
used by Boulez as a germ for his
musical ideas, but the piece itself
is not a poetic background for the
poetry; rather it is abstract mu-
sic, significant beyond the mean-
ings of the words.
The difficulty of the listener in
the work is the tremendous con-
centration of musical events in
short spaces of time. Glittering
and delicate in its-intricacy, the
intense, carefully controlled poly-
phony of "Le Marteau sans
Maitre" has a mosaic-like beauty
which ishperhaps classical in its
impact.
There is nothing classic about
Stockhausen's "Kontakte". In its
lavish array of sounds and dra-
matic expressiveness it is, per-
haps, in the tradition of German

records
Columbia's Back to Classics

romanticism. In any case the mu-
sic clearly harks back to the ex-
uberant and gigantic sound-ex-
plosions of Varese's "Arcana" and
"Poeme Electronique".
The work, completed in 1960,
pits a piano and a variety of per-
cussion against a four-track re-
corded tape of electronic sounds
Ideally, the two instrumentalists
are positioned ,on a stage, with
the audience surrounding th:em,
while four speakers are arranged
outside the .audience. A huge
scope of electronic sounds is used
in the piece, often with violence
and profusion. Clusters of tones,
noises, and everything between
appear as fragments or are de-
veloped in sonic processes. Pow-
erful contrasts are rampant
throughout the work. The spatial
arrangement of the speakers nnd
performers is also utilized, and at
times the sounds are rotated from
speaker to speaker, giving a weird
spiraling effect to . the mttsiz.
There is little of the Apollon'n
detachment and restraint of "Le
Marteau"; the listener is Jm-
mersed in a swirling vortex of
sound.
The live performers add an ex-'
tra range of possibility to the
static recording. The title of the
piece refers to the contacts, in
several musical ways, that are set
up in the piece between the per-
formers and the tape. In the up-
coming concert the piano part
will be played by William Al-
bright, the percussion by Jerome
Hartweg. The elaborate four-
track recording of the work took
almost a year for Prof. George
Wilson, who organized the con-
cert, to obtain. He finally had to
write directly to Stockhausen in
Germany. Technical advice for
the performance was given by
Motown records.
The concert is scheduled for
8:30 p.m. in Rackham Aud. Ad-
mission is free.

Horrifies
Mothers
JACKSON, Calif. P)-A con-
troversial plaque commemorating
this town's former bordellos has
been spirited to A secret hiding
place by town fathers.
Somone spilled red paint all
over it Tuesday, and the removal
was taken to prevent further de-
struction of the heart shaped com-
memoration, an official said.
The plaque was dedicated on
Valentine's Day. It immediately
prompted bitter controversy.
Proponents said it commemo-
rated a "very real part of Jack-
son's history." This historic
Mother Lode mining town's broth-
els flourished until 1952.
Detractors, including clergy men,
mothers and schoolgirls, said a
town that honored prostitutes was
no place to raise a family.
At a crowded and noisy city
council meeting Monday night, of-
ficials divided 3-2 in favor of keep-
ing the plaque on display.
Open Housing Wins
In Flint Voting
FLINT - A referendum on
a City Commission-passed open
housing law was approved
Tuesday by a 20,172 to 20,129
margin. Earlier reports that the
law had been repealed were
due to a 100-vote tabulating
error in the first unofficial
tabulations.

STARTING
FRIDAY

By R. A. PERRY
tt er releasing a- barrage of
avant-garde recordings (ironically
taking the chance out of chance
music), Columbia has returned
this month to its standard prac-
tice of presenting the major clas-
sics in performances by major
artists. Included in their list of
new releases are two important
disc sets, both previous collector's'
items.
In a three-record Odyssey, re-
lease (3 2 - 3 6 - 0 0 13), Henryk
Szeryng presents the rendition of
Bach's Sonatas and Partitas for,
Unaccompanied Violin that won
him the Grand Prix Du Disque in
1954. The music contains some of
Bach's most magnificent composi-
tion; the performance exhibits a
perfection of intonation and level
of communication equal to if not
greater than any other version in
the catalog.
The three sonatas in sonata da
chiesa form and the three par-
titas which are essentially dance
suites contain rich harmonic in-
vention, sustained passages of
melodic writing with its own self-
contained contrapuntal accom-
paniment, and a weaving of mel-
ody that produces sublime poly-
phony. At first sitting, these
works may seem difficult to lis-
ten to, but each session yields
exciting insight into the musical
texture and a growing transport
into the realm of pure musical
communication sans programatic
intent and orchestral gossip.
Szeryng's tempos are almost all
slower and1more deliberate than
one normally hears, and I can-
not deny that some of the brio
and breath-taking momentum of
the music is lacking. These quali-
ties may be found in abundance
in Grumiaux's rendition for Phil-
lips. Nevertheless, Szeryng reveals
much of the contrapuntal devel-
opment and dialogue which in
other versions is stated only by
a show of virtuosic technique.
Never digging into the strings
with the passion of Szigetti,
$zeryng's unfaltering tone rav-
ishes the ear as well as orders
the mind in accord with the order
of the music. This is a record set
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-2782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor

which one shall listen to over a
lifetime.
Students wishing to acquire for
their record collections the last
six symphonies of Mozart and
who do not demand stereo, will
find all they could wish for in an-
other Odyssey release (32-36-009),
featuring Sir Thomas Beecham
and the Royal Philharmonic Or-
chestra.
Space does not offer itself to a
discussion of Beecham's way with
each symphony; suffice 'it to say
that the- maestro was master of
the Mozartean style and he re-
veals not only the lyricism of
these works, but also, and perhaps
more important, all of the musi-
cal structure without ever ap-
proaching the Germanic heavi-
ness of, say, Klemperer. The
"Linz" and "Haffner" are espe-
cially joyful.
The monaural sound possesses
sufficient space and color, and in-
terior voices can be heard without
the latter-day artificiality of nu-
merous microphone placement.
Schubert's "Trout" Quintet is
one of the most unabashedly lyri-

cal works of chamber music in
existence. Rudolf Serkin and a
quartet from the Marlboro work-
shop play it (MS 7067) for all its
worth and the result is something
like eating too much Vienna torte.
There can be no doubt that the
Serkin group give a brilliant, driv-
ing, intensely happy reading, but
some of the more subtle and ser-
ene moments are engulfed in such
enthusiasm.
Problems of ensemble balance
exist as well; Serkin has been
made too prominent and the vio-
lin of Jaime Laredo too distant,
but the record is worth its price
alone simply for Julius Levine's
bass playing, which throbs like
the heart of Nature itself. I can-
not imagine anyone listening to
this record and remaining de-
pressed for very long.

"TERENCE STAMP
PETER FINCH
ALAN BATES

SCREENPLAYYFREDERIC RAPHAEL THOMAS HARDY
DIRECTEDBY JOHN SCHLESINGER
Shows at 1:00-3:30-6:10-8:45 * Week Day Matinees $1.50;

E . .$MGM
Eves. & Sun. $1.75

I

Th1earechungers
noIman Can deny
amamy ?smmfr m:

PRESENT S
National Theatre of Canada
SHAKESPEARE'S
"A Midsummer Night's Dream"
with

ENDING TONIGHT: DEAN MARTIN in "THE AMBUSHERS"
ACADEMY
AWARD
NO 2-6264 NOMINATIONS
Including: * BEST ACTOR (Warren Beatty) * BEST PICTURE
BEST ACTRESS (Faye Dunaway) - BEST DIRECTOR, (Penn)
.*BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS (Estelle Parsons)
TWO BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR (Pollard and Hackmon)
UA?? I I3ETYA

4

I

DOUGLAS RAIN MARTHA HENRY
as Bottom as Titania

r-o C w Z
t y« '
FOR THE MOST MATURE
^r AF ImIrkifIrt.

Directed by JOHN HIRSCH

Designed by LESLIE HURRY

..I SOLE U.S. ENGAGEMENT

II

I

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.

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